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Discussion Starter · #2,981 ·
With the holes drilled, Everett poured some (very expensive) expanding mortar of some description into all the holes, resulting in this.

Pretty amazing stuff. It takes about 24 hours to work, but it sure does the job.

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Discussion Starter · #2,982 ·
A major chunk of this rock is still residing in place, but enough was removed from the top that it will not bother the future gravel and paving operation.

We had to remove about 6" of ground which would be replaced with a layer of gravel and finally the asphalt. I think Everett spent a good two days getting everything to his satisfaction.

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Discussion Starter · #2,984 ·
darn, thaats a pretty big rock. around here, that rock would be worth $$$$'s

amazing what that expanding stuff can do.
Well, it would be worth money around here as well, except that you would need something like a 450 machine to move it. It costs at least $450 just to move the 450 before you even get started. I think we have been paying around $400 for a truckload of the bigger rocks that we use to build the walls here.
 
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About a week or more ago, we were surprised by a very early snowfall here...

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We usually aren't quite that unlucky this early in the season. But then yesterday, we had an unusually very warm day.
 

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In between that nasty snowstorm and a few days ago, I did manage to make a door for the greenhouse.

Just a simple affair made out of a couple of 2 x 2's for the stiles and three 2 x 4's for the rails. I wrapped that framework with 6 mil poly on both sides, then added a piece of re-cycled OSB to the lower front side. That was more or less to try and keep the door square and provide some rudimentary protection from any critters that might decide to get in.

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And because it was so warm here yesterday, we got some more benchwork done inside. Val had to move the potted plants inside, as the deer were still very intent on chewing up as many as they could for lunch.

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Still have the top part of that bench to build, but it's cold here again today, so it looks like it will have to wait a few more days.
 

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Do you have some type of heat for your green house?
Just Mother Nature Jim. When we went in to the greenhouse yesterday, it must have been at least 25ºC, or about 77ºF. I think it was about 10ºC outside.
 

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Just Mother Nature Jim. When we went in to the greenhouse yesterday, it must have been at least 25ºC, or about 77ºF. I think it was about 10ºC outside.
That is too cool buddy, nothing like free heat.
 

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I see that I have quite a bit of updating to do now.

There have been some exciting developments lately, not the least of which was the blowing up of our heat pump. OK, maybe blowing up is a small exaggeration, but it did let go with quite a bang when it died.

So we got the local guy out to have a look at it to see what the trouble is, and after doing some testing it turns out that the compressor has gone, along with one of the PC boards - naturally it is the bigger of the two - and at the same time he advises us that there definitely needs to be a disconnect right close to the pump, and that little item is conspicuous by its' absence. There might be a few other bits that need replacing, but I don't know much more than that.

He calls in to his parts supplier, located down in Kelowna, and checks on the available parts and any possible warranty claim on the compressor. By a stroke of good fortune, it seems that the compressor is covered under warranty, but nothing else. OK, that's good, because the compressor is a very cool $1,200 bill. So now we are awaiting the parts delivery and the ensuing installation thereof. Next week should see things back in order again, but in the meantime, we are putting the old wood stove to good use.

Next item: A couple of weeks ago Val decides that we need to remove a couple of trees which are shading an area which she wants to turn into a garden. No worries sez I, and the next day I get all set up to remove the fir tree, which was by far the bigger of the two. There is only one option for the direction for the tree to fall, and that goes without incident. We successfully limb the tree, burn all the branches and cut the log into firewood. In turn we move all those chunks to the carport where we have the wood splitter. That is all now split and stacked and will be ready for next winter.

The other tree is a much smaller cedar, but with all the branches growing off to the south east side, about 90º off from where I need it to go. The weight of the branches is obviously going to be a problem, so I attach a long rope to the tree, haul it up the driveway and instruct Val to pull like hell as soon as I start the back cut. As soon as the tree starts to move, it is obvious that Val's weight is no match for the tree and it unceremoniously lands on the side of my Chevy. I am not amused. Fortunately, the damage is very minor, more an annoyance than anything.

After this little happenstance, Val immediately changes her mind as to the location of the urgently needed raised beds, thus rendering the damage to the poor vehicle unnecessary.

Which brings us to today, wherein I am advised that I must build several raised beds, but not the kind you and I would normally be thinking of. Oh no! These raised beds are to be raised right off the ground, literally up in the air! In other words they are to be magically constructed high enough so that we don't need to be bending down at all in order to admire the beautiful little flowers, or harvest the abundance of food that these beds will magically produce. It seems that Val has seen some little gadget maybe about three feet long and a foot or more wide that stands on legs which will do the job. It is, naturally, filled with gorgeous flowers in the advertising, but honestly it appears to be totally useless for growing any veggies in the real world. I didn't dare ask the cost of this contrivance.

The end result of all this is that Val has no idea how these raised beds are to be built and she was quite aggravated with me when I tried to explain that raised beds are normally built on the ground and filled with dirt and you go from there. Of course, this simply will not do, and I am told in no uncertain terms that I will build these wondrous devices forthwith as the newly planted seeds are all now coming up in the greenhouse and will need to be planted outside sooner rather than later. Never mind that it is still going down to just below freezing at night lately. Hmmmm, OK, let's see what we can come up with.

To make a long story short, a trip to The House of Pot in Kamloops follows and we return home with another $700+ load of lumber and treated plywood. I am sure that with the cost of the greenhouse materials, the deer fencing paraphernalia, (more about that later) and this new pile of stuff, that we are well into the $2,500 range so that we can grow eight bucks worth of veggies and a few flowers. I'm hard pressed to come up with a more financially impressive use of funds!

Stay tuned, more to follow shortly.....
 

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These raised beds are to be raised right off the ground, literally up in the air! In other words they are to be magically constructed high enough so that we don't need to be bending down at all in order to admire the beautiful little flowers, or harvest the abundance of food that these beds will magically produce.

Well, if the goal is to avoid having to bend over to tend them, then you could make normal raised beds at ground level, then excavate ditches between them for walkways. ;)
 

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Interesting, the little flag icon in your information block is evidently selected automatically by the forum software based on your current IP address, not your registered location. My information block is currently showing the flag of Niger (which is where I happen to be at the moment) but if you hover your cursor over it, it says "Anchorage, Alaska" which is home, and my location in my profile.
 

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Good grief, that makes me tired just thinking about all that work. Buddy you are the poster child for the Energizer bunny. You never cease to amaze me and you are a year older than me. I am wore out just trying to set up my new wood working shop (small as it is).

By the way, how is the price of lumber up your way? It is almost untouchable down this way, $10 for an 8 foot treated 2X4 is just a little much. A buddy of mine just wrote that he was looking at some 8X8X10 angelique post $260 each. nope not this ole boy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2,994 ·
Well, if the goal is to avoid having to bend over to tend them, then you could make normal raised beds at ground level, then excavate ditches between them for walkways. ;)
That's actually a very valid point of view. However, the ground where the raised beds are going is loaded with more rock than I care to mention. Plus it would mean going up and down a short set of stairs to get in and out of the trenches. So I will just grin and bear the torture that is sure to follow very shortly!
 

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Interesting, the little flag icon in your information block is evidently selected automatically by the forum software based on your current IP address, not your registered location. My information block is currently showing the flag of Niger (which is where I happen to be at the moment) but if you hover your cursor over it, it says "Anchorage, Alaska" which is home, and my location in my profile.
I just noticed that in the wee hours this morning as I was reading through some of my last escapades here. Just another example of big brother keeping an eye on us.
 

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Good grief, that makes me tired just thinking about all that work. Buddy you are the poster child for the Energizer bunny. You never cease to amaze me and you are a year older than me. I am wore out just trying to set up my new wood working shop (small as it is).

By the way, how is the price of lumber up your way? It is almost untouchable down this way, $10 for an 8 foot treated 2X4 is just a little much. A buddy of mine just wrote that he was looking at some 8X8X10 angelique post $260 each. nope not this ole boy.
We are stuck with the same criminal prices as you are Jim. Yesterday the House of Pot nailed me for $143 for 12 10 foot 2 x 4's. Not even treated. Their excuse for this greedy price is that the mills have been on partial production due to the Covid 19 virus. You can bet that once they are back to full production that the prices won't go down a similar amount as to what they went up.
 

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OK, so this morning it has dawned totally overcast and 5º C here. Not too bad, but none too warm either. I have just backed the trailer down to where all this mystical construction is to happen, and once again, Val has kindly informed me that I will be adding one more element to the elevated beds. I think elevated is more realistic than raised, they aren't quite the same thing.

I will be sure to take my camera down to take pictures of this "Taj Mahal" style garden.
 
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Here we go again.....

Started working on the elevated garden this morning, when Princess Val decided that it would be a marvellous idea to have all the support posts set into dek blocks. We have about three of those left, and we would need something like 15 or so to do the job.

My negative pleas fell on deaf ears, naturally, and I am completely ashamed to say that we have made yet another trip in to Kamloops today and acquired 14 more dek blocks. The only shining light with this episode, is that HD tried to convince Val that they didn't have any in stock (online said they had 18 this morning) but she had seen them outside the front of the store. Eventually someone actually listened to her and agreed to sell her 12. But due to their wasting her time for so long, they added two more for free! Such a deal!

Incidentally, we had a similar happenstance yesterday with the treated plywood. The young fellow helping me load the plywood noticed that there was a crack in the surface veneer, something which we all know is very common. However, with his four days of experience on the job, he was gracious enough to add an extra sheet for free. At $64.16 a pop, I was only too happy to thank him most sincerely for his generosity with HD's money!
 

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We are stuck with the same criminal prices as you are Jim. Yesterday the House of Pot nailed me for $143 for 12 10 foot 2 x 4's. Not even treated. Their excuse for this greedy price is that the mills have been on partial production due to the Covid 19 virus. You can bet that once they are back to full production that the prices won't go down a similar amount as to what they went up.
I found what I thought was a deal on some 1X6 T&G, $.79 a lin ft, that stuff for sure isn't fit for anything inside a home. I plan to make French Cleats on a wall in my shop so some of it is usable. I have never seen such greed. Kinda makes you wish you still had your mill doesn't it Keith?
 

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I found what I thought was a deal on some 1X6 T&G, $.79 a lin ft, that stuff for sure isn't fit for anything inside a home. I plan to make French Cleats on a wall in my shop so some of it is usable. I have never seen such greed. Kinda makes you wish you still had your mill doesn't it Keith?
You know Jim, just a couple of days ago I was saying to Val that if someone only needs rough lumber, it would be well worth it to buy a small mill. They really aren't that expensive.

Turns out that our friends just a few hundred yards away from here have such a beast. They bought it so that they could re-machine a large truckload of timbers which they have had for a number of years. I'm not sure what it is, but Steve did mention that it was incredibly heavy, to the tune of 80,000 pounds, so I am assuming it is likely some kind of hardwood. Either that, or old growth fir.

Plus, towards the end of last year they bought what is probably the largest single plot of land in Anglemont right next door to us. I think it is 40 acres. Totally covered with trees, most of which is young growth, not over 100 years old. Lots of birch, fir, pine and some cedar. Steve blew a fairly long road through down to the main road, I guess a couple of hundred yards or so, which provided lots of trees either for lumber or firewood. We have but one fairly big cedar here which Val would like to get rid of, as she doesn't much care for the mess it makes every year. There's probably 30 to 35 feet of pipe that would make half decent lumber.
 
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