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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey folks as you see below I am starting a shower remodel. There was a heavy duty fiberglass shower pan in here previously that could withstand weight above this gap in the concrete subfloor. I was hoping to use Kerdi systems and one of the Kerdi prefab foam shower pans but I don’t think it will hold up over that gap. What would you do to fill the gap? I think it was put there by plumbers to have access to the drainage system. I could fill it with compressed gravel or I can fill it with concrete.
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The gap is there so they could rough-in the plumbing, and the plumbers would have room to move the drain to match the selected pan witjhout chipping concrete. What you can do now is get a bag of sakrete from home depot and fill in everything except about a 1" space around the pipe. Actually ... cut the bottom out of a coffee can, slip it over the pipe, and fill the rest of the space. You do have an empty coffee can ... right?
 

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Naildriver
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If you plan on using a Kerdi pan, make sure the pipe is where you need it to be before you concrete it in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks man No but I don’t have a coffee can but I get your drift and I can find something similar. Now we’re talking wet concrete or should I leave it dry so it’s easier to dig out and access the plumbing for some future DIY?
 

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Naildriver
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Wet. You won't be digging it up anytime soon, and if you do, use an SDS or jack hammer. You need the smooth surface more than you need access to the pipe.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey what do you guys think about my plumbing options here? You’ll see that the previous install bent the copper as if it were conduit. In order to get the right length and angles without getting trapped behind that stud, I’m thinking pex is my best option especially on the hot side. What do you think? I’ll be using a single handle Moen or Delta valve

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Naildriver
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You'll need a brace across the 2x lumber to screw your new valve body to. What you have must have been awfully sloppy. Yes, PEX is your friend, more so than bent copper tubing. Make sure your shower stand pipe and drop ear are also fastened to cross lumber.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks man will do. It was probably done by the old guy who lived here. The copper on the cold side is actually distorted probably from the blow torch I guess. And the shower stem is affixed with bent nails!
 

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retired framer
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Hey guys how important do you think those two by fours are? In order to center the valve and shower stem I would need to cut out that 2 x 4 and move the whole operation a few inches to the right.
As there is nothing below it, it mist not be all that important.
I wouldn't remove it all as the drywall on the other side is likely attached, cut out what you need and and try to scab it back together after you have located the valve.
Or just cut a notch in it big enough for the valve.
 

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Naildriver
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Are they actually touching the drywall behind them? They appear to be installed cross ways. If so, use a reciprocating saw and cut the nails along the bottom plate and pull them out, placing them back in more advantageous positions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yeah the drywall is actually not mounted onto those studs which are indeed installed with the broadside out rather than the traditional way. Makes me think that framing was just for the shower alcove and not really structural.
 
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