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Discussion Starter #1
Good morning everyone,

Hope everyone is safe & healthy in these interesting times

I've been a lurker for a few years now, with a few posts here and there... mostly because I've been lucky that everything I've wanted has already been in the search.

This time, it's pretty unique though :)

So, we're doing a bathroom renovation; and I remove the fiberglass tub to find the pics in the link at the bottom.

Background:
Previous owner replaced all copper pipes with pvc on his own, because the water here eats through copper pipes.
The results, as you'll see are... interesting... in some places.

My question:
To install the new shower faucet, to the current PVC pipes, what do I do?

Long-awaited link to pics:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/q6lfhhfvg64mwwy/AACowx5JSmTK4eopV8_QqB32a?dl=0

I've added some comments to the pics, that hopefully will help explain what you're looking at.
If you have questions, let me know, please

Thanks for looking!
BigEgyptian
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Hi everyone,

Looks like my search skills are not what they used to be...
In looking into this some more, here's what I think I'll need to do:
1. Remove the mess that I have here
2. On the new value, solder a small pipe adapter to turn the thread coming out of the new valve into a female thread
3. On the pipe side, add an adapter for a male thread
4. Use teflon tape to connect both together

Did I miss anything?

Thanks
BigEgyptian
 

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I would see what other homes in your neighborhood have problems with their copper pipes. Most leaks with copper are with homes more than 50 years old unless there is a special problem with either the pH of the water or someone used small diameter pipe that increased water velocity.

Copper pipe can be purchase in thin and thicker wall and as it adds little to the cost for your project the thicker wall would be my choice, though where I live rodents are a problem. If you go with plastic then go with the right type of PEX tubing and quality fittings and be sure to do pressure testing with actual water flow before sealing the wall. I have seen pipes that were fine with 72 hours of static pressure but that started to develop leaks at the fitting immediately when the faucet was turned on.

While you are at it put in a cannister type pressure balance valve like the ones from Grohe. Nice to not have the water in a shower go to super hot when someone flushes a toilet.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I would see what other homes in your neighborhood have problems with their copper pipes. Most leaks with copper are with homes more than 50 years old unless there is a special problem with either the pH of the water or someone used small diameter pipe that increased water velocity.

Copper pipe can be purchase in thin and thicker wall and as it adds little to the cost for your project the thicker wall would be my choice, though where I live rodents are a problem. If you go with plastic then go with the right type of PEX tubing and quality fittings and be sure to do pressure testing with actual water flow before sealing the wall. I have seen pipes that were fine with 72 hours of static pressure but that started to develop leaks at the fitting immediately when the faucet was turned on.

While you are at it put in a cannister type pressure balance valve like the ones from Grohe. Nice to not have the water in a shower go to super hot when someone flushes a toilet.

Haven’t thought about those valves, I’ll make sure to look into them.

Was thinking of going with PEX, only because that’s what the majority of the house has at the moment.

Thanks!


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Discussion Starter #5
Posting another question on the same thread, here, as I continue to try to fix all the problems...

So, as you can see in the image below, the shower valve is not secured to anything. The only thing holding it in place are the pipes.

How would you secure it, knowing that a 2x4 across would not work, because of the black vent pipe?


https://www.dropbox.com/s/ph4x0pnqlngl62c/Photo Mar 22, 3 00 02 PM.jpg?dl=0
 

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All that is needed is a large enough piece of 3/4 plywood for a backing. This will protect the pipe from something nailed into the sheetrock and provide support for the pipes. Easy to attach tubing straps with short screws into the plywood. If you need more depth for the mixer valve you can cut a small square opening in the plywood. It would also be possible to cut the vent pipe and add four 90's to route it closer to the center of the bay as it is only venting air and this will not impair its performance.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
All that is needed is a large enough piece of 3/4 plywood for a backing. This will protect the pipe from something nailed into the sheetrock and provide support for the pipes. Easy to attach tubing straps with short screws into the plywood. If you need more depth for the mixer valve you can cut a small square opening in the plywood. It would also be possible to cut the vent pipe and add four 90's to route it closer to the center of the bay as it is only venting air and this will not impair its performance.

Thank you Calson!

Haven’t thought about cutting the vent pipe, this makes perfect sense.
Will have to try this tomorrow morning & take pics when done


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