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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I'm building a barrier-free shower in my basement.
The floor is concrete (poured 6 months ago)
The frame is 20ga equivalent steel.
I got 5/8in DensShield for the walls and ceiling.
I like the Fiandra Beige 12 in. x 24 in. Glazed Porcelain Floor and Wall Tile for the walls, but did not buy them yet. Not sure if they would be good for the ceiling. Also need some matching mosaic for the floor.

After reading the manufacturer's documentation and lots of conflicting info on the web I need to come up with a shopping list and an action plan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Screws

First things first, GP recommends "Buglehead, rust thread, sharp point rust resistant drywall screws" installed every 6" along framing.
Does it translate to just any 1.25" black drywall screw or there is something better?
 

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Tileguy
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No, those cheapo drywall screws is not what they're describing.

What is going on the floor of this shower? If it's tiles, you'll want to study the diagram located in their data sheet and online.

Jaz
 

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Dark Knight
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First things first, GP recommends "Buglehead, rust thread, sharp point rust resistant drywall screws" installed every 6" along framing.
Does it translate to just any 1.25" black drywall screw or there is something better?
No do not use regular drywall screws, definitely use what the mfr. recommends. Especially somewhere wet, you want to go with what will last.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have hard time finding better screws...
Could you post some HD, Lowes, Amzon etc. examples?
(I'll move on to the floor and other items one I have my screws figured out)
 

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Have you checked out the product information sheets on what to use for attaching the board? That should give you type, diameter and length for various materials you're screwing to. You'll probably need self drilling screws since you're using 20 gauge metal, unless you want to drill pilot holes. They will need to be zinc plated. I would try Fastenal or an online source, even ebay, because I don't think the big box stores will carry them.
 

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Tileguy
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GKL7 said:
I'll move on to the floor and other items one I have my screws figured out
Make sure you know what step #2 will be before you start #1. It's all kinda connected. I'm saying this cuz after studying how the Dens gets installed at the bottom of showers, you might wanna use something else. Go look at DS002.

Jaz
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Shower Bed

On to step two.
Mortar bed or custom made tile basin (3-pound high density EPS foam)?
Laying a large mortar bed (53"x75") does not sound like a DIY task. I can hire a pro to do it, but I think even he would have hard time making it a perfect shape at that size.
See DS007 for reference:
 

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Tileguy
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JazzMan, I'm using One Coat Float, DS007.
So you're doing a mud job then. They tell you to install the mud per TCNA method W231. Are you familiar with W231? I don't understand why you'd wanna build a shower wall that way even if you were a seasoned mud guy. I don't see the point of Dens with lath and then ¾" of mud over it if you're a DIY'er. Both sketches are very deceiving as the thicknesses are not true.

I'm thinking you're not gonna follow the GP data, but hybrid with the Merkrete system so it's not gonna be like DS007.

Jaz
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Wasn't familiar with W231 but I can Google.
W231 is for "WALLS, INTERIOR Wood Studs or Furring, Cement Mortar"
My case would be W242 "WALLS, INTERIOR, Metal Studs Gypsum Board, Organic Adhesive".
But they both for walls.
My question is about the floor. Which one of the following is better / easier?
A sloped mortar bed coated with a layer of Hydroguard + fabric (so water never gets to the wallboard's bottom edge )
- or -
A custom made foam shower slope, like KBRS or similar also coated with a waterproofing layer.
 

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Tileguy
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First of all I hope you do NOT use organic adhesive for a shower.

As for W231 I'm just quoting the directions GP wants you to follow. Personally I think their directions are convoluted to the max. Those diagrams are ridiculous and they also mention the option of using organic adhesive aka mastic. That tells me they don't care how long your shower will last, definitely not 'best practice'.

What is the point of using One Coat Float system?

According to the TCNA Handbook, W231/W241 is for both wood or metal studs, but the thickness of the wall mud is min. ¾" to 1 ½". I think GP is quoting the wrong method.

You don't wanna do W242 for a shower! Where did you get that idea?

I like the Kerdi Drain/Membrane method the best.

Jaz
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I just pulled W242 of Google to have a response to your W231 :)
Once I decided on how to create the sloped floor I'm planning to use a waterproof membrane on it (Kerdi or similar) and a couple of of inches up the wall.
If I decide to create a mortar slope floor (for the whole bathroom, as it is barrier-less), what kind of mortar would I use? (Considering that it'll be waterproofed from the top, if that matters)
 

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Tileguy
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Being on a slab, the easiest way is to make a small speed-bump where the curb would normally be. Install mosaics in a strip several inches wide to accent the hump. This way you keep the floor of the bathroom as is. You'll have to raise the shower floor though to slope it.

Otherwise you mud the entire room, but that means the entire room will be a couple inches higher than it is now.

Ideally curbless shower bathrooms woulda been planned ahead of time and the whole room would be 2-3 inches lower to start.

Jaz
 
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