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Should I use the suspect wood as siding?

  • Yes - save some money!

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  • no - trash it

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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi there and thanks for your help.

I have inherited a few hundred dollars worth of wooden siding. It was previously painted before being stored under a deck for many years (not sure how many!). There were lots of woodlouse & spiders, but the area was dry as the deck above was covered with a roof.

As I am carrying it out, some bits break under their own weight as they are about 12 feet long. So I investigate the quality of the wood and TBH it is not in great shape. I know I should only use decent lumber for construction, but as this is siding and fairly easy to replace if it does go bad down the line, I thought it might be okay to use. My worry is that I will 'infect' or 'innoculate' the rest of my structure if this siding has dry rot or something similar.

The wood feels a little lighter than expected and is weak, and there may be some tiny holes, which could be insect infestation (please see photos).

So would you advise me to use it, or just burn it?

Thanks again for your help.
 

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retired framer
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I don't know if I Would use it on a new house but there might be a market for it when some one is repairing a house with the same siding.
They look like cedar and when they are really dry they will be brittle, when new they are packaged 4 or 6 together to add strength.
You can buy a copper treatment that will kill almost anything, it paints like water.
 

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I wouldn't use it in an exterior application, but it might look neat inside a shop or a mancave.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys. I will look more carefully for signs of beetles.

I might also use it to line my basement man-cave - great suggestion.

I did not know it was cedar and hence potentially brittle when dry - I am newbie to home-improvements - so thanks for that info.
 

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retired painter
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Not sure I'd use it on a house but I tore down an old house a couple of years ago and salvage a bunch of the siding to go on an addition to my barn/shop. Not as nice as new but it did the job and I didn't have to pay for it.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Make Picture frames from it, and sell it as fancy art work.

There is an industry here that salvages those wooden snow fences along the highways, and sells the weathered planks to decorators that hang the wood in Man caves, or restaurants, or places that want that look.

ED
 

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Contractor/Engineer
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I really don't think it could be worth the risk bringing it onto your own property.

You already know it's weak and has suspect infestation.

I think you know the answer but were reluctant to throw away what you still hoped would be a good deal.
 

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If paint, test for lead if you want to use it. I'm not sure about the stains. Check for info on older stains. Also, even if dry, it's not a good idea to store wood ground contact. Termites begin that way.


Few hundred dollars. It isn't worth using it on a house, which can cost a few hundred thousand. Some locales, you can't burn it either because of the paint or possible treatments it may have had. Somethings are junk and nobody's treasure, no matter what.:smile:
 
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