DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone! I am planning to run LED lights around my ceiling edge using V-shaped LED channel (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06Y2Z8PST). I will also use these (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06Y2KJTDS) for corners and attaching channels themselves to the ceiling and/or the wall.

I am not very familiar with intimate details of wall/ceiling constructions especially around the wall-ceiling corner. This brings me to my question.

Would it be better if I attach brackets to the wall or ceiling? I want to avoid screwing those brackets too close to the wall or ceiling sheetrock edge.

If anyone can provide good resource with images of the wall/ceiling construction (not as much of beams or joists but the sheetrock mounting itself) I would also appreciate it.

Feel free to ask for more details if it will affect the answer

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
Hi, Aleksey
I just noticed your question. Here is my advice if you still need it.

I used a similar channel for LED tape. The screws for the brackets included in the package too short if you planing to attached it to gyp. bd. wall or ceiling.
So you may need to buy the longer screws to hit the framing behind the sheetrock, or use a drywall anchors to attached it to drywall directly.
Luckily these channels are wery light, you just need 2 brackets per channel.

If you'll decide to attach channel at the top of the wall, typically you will have from 1" to 3/4" of top plate behind the drywall to attach your brackets.

At the ceiling , depending of you ceiling joist framing, you may have either joists at 16"-24" o.c. or nailing strip for ceiling drywall attachment (for walls parellel to the ceiling joists)

It will be difficult to screw the bracket so close to the ceiling or wall without flex, 90 deg. attachment or long drill bit extension to you drill. Be careful not to damage the wall or ceiling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,683 Posts
Flat channels (or crown molding) on the wall with the LED's facing up so that the light bounces off the white ceiling to better fill the room is the best way to do it IMO.

If you want a "solid" pin stripe of light around the edge I recommend "Neon LED" which is more like a rope. You'll likely get a series of "dots" of light with the channels that have a "diffuser" cover like you got (the leds cut through that stuff pretty bad in my experience.) Maybe that's the look you're going for here though? Did you look at the customer images that are all dotty there?

That said, I don't think it matters with V-channel, it's probably more secure to mount to the wall as they tend to have less texture so it'll give a cleaner look. Either way though, a little silicone will clean up any gaps on the bottom edge/wall edge either way.
 

·
Hammered Thumb
Joined
·
2,743 Posts
Sorry your thread got lost in the shuffle. If you still have yet to install this:

- Mount at top of wall, there should be about 2 1/2" of wood to screw to (you do not want to just screw only into drywall). This will allow you to mount the brackets anywhere along that line (you won't have to worry about the spacing of hitting the ceiling joists if you attached to the ceiling). It would be better to evenly space the brackets on each track though, as you will see the bracket lips sticking over the track.

- Use a long level, or better a laser level (even string if no other means), to align the brackets. Keep the track from touching the ceiling, as the ceiling plane may have inconsistencies or bulges here and there.

- Use "construction" or "drywall" screws minimum 1" long, not the supplied ones. Predrilling will ensure that the screw does not jockey in at an unpredicted angle and moving the bracket from your mark.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Wow! For some reason I did not get any notifications about new responses. Was surprised to see quite a few. Thank you all.

I am planning to install it in our rental apartment and want to avoid anything major. So ideally I would prefer to simply screw them onto the wall.

If you want a "solid" pin stripe of light around the edge I recommend "Neon LED" which is more like a rope. You'll likely get a series of "dots" of light with the channels that have a "diffuser" cover like you got (the leds cut through that stuff pretty bad in my experience.) Maybe that's the look you're going for here though? Did you look at the customer images that are all dotty there?
Yes, I did see images and its ok. I am going to be using addressable LEDs in order to be able to control "animations" and different patterns/palettes. One of the patterns would include something like a "starry night" theme where individual LEDs would light up and fade randomly. So being able to see "dots" is kind of a plus in my case.

If you'll decide to attach channel at the top of the wall, typically you will have from 1" to 3/4" of top plate behind the drywall to attach your brackets.

At the ceiling , depending of you ceiling joist framing, you may have either joists at 16"-24" o.c. or nailing strip for ceiling drywall attachment (for walls parellel to the ceiling joists)
What do you mean by "top plate"? Also, I am not sure what kind of joist framing we have.

- Mount at top of wall, there should be about 2 1/2" of wood to screw to (you do not want to just screw only into drywall). This will allow you to mount the brackets anywhere along that line (you won't have to worry about the spacing of hitting the ceiling joists if you attached to the ceiling). It would be better to evenly space the brackets on each track though, as you will see the bracket lips sticking over the track.

- Use "construction" or "drywall" screws minimum 1" long, not the supplied ones. Predrilling will ensure that the screw does not jockey in at an unpredicted angle and moving the bracket from your mark.
Do you mean to say that there should be a wood strip along the top of the wall? So, when workers attach a drywall they nail it around perimeter to the studs and that wood strip, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
What do you mean by "top plate"? Also, I am not sure what kind of joist framing we have.


Do you mean to say that there should be a wood strip along the top of the wall? So, when workers attach a drywall they nail it around perimeter to the studs and that wood strip, right?
See the attached image. Top plate means the horizontal member of a frame wall.

You can buy a cheap stud finder to locate the direction of your floor joist span.
It also will be useful for you to locate the studs behing the drywall.

plan_bath Model (2).jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
See the attached image. Top plate means the horizontal member of a frame wall.

You can buy a cheap stud finder to locate the direction of your floor joist span.
It also will be useful for you to locate the studs behing the drywall.

View attachment 570979
Nice! I have a stud finder and yes, I did find the top plate... about 2 inch or so below the ceiling. Thank you! I think that answers my question. :)

So, with standard thickness of the drywall being 3/8 or 1/2, if I take an inch-long screw that should be sufficient for secure attachment to the wall, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,683 Posts
Yes, I did see images and its ok. I am going to be using addressable LEDs in order to be able to control "animations" and different patterns/palettes. One of the patterns would include something like a "starry night" theme where individual LEDs would light up and fade randomly. So being able to see "dots" is kind of a plus in my case.
Sweet! I'm doing the same kind of thing under my eaves. I love the individually addressable 5050's - using a mix of WS2812B's and WS2813's myself. Are you using a pre-made system/kit or making your own Arduino type driver?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Aleksey79

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Yes, I did see images and its ok. I am going to be using addressable LEDs in order to be able to control "animations" and different patterns/palettes. One of the patterns would include something like a "starry night" theme where individual LEDs would light up and fade randomly. So being able to see "dots" is kind of a plus in my case.
Sweet! I'm doing the same kind of thing under my eaves. I love the individually addressable 5050's - using a mix of WS2812B's and WS2813's myself. Are you using a pre-made system/kit or making your own Arduino type driver?
Making my own. Hoping to setup a customizable system with LCD screen with 20 meters of LEDs all around our living room.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,683 Posts
Making my own. Hoping to setup a customizable system with LCD screen with 20 meters of LEDs all around our living room.
Might want to check out LEDEDIT (I think I have the 2014 version with a T-1000S controller) Software lets you set up light shows however you want, also can do matrix's to make pictures

(I'm so doing a "waving" LED US flag on the side of my house :vs_OMG:)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Aleksey79

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Making my own. Hoping to setup a customizable system with LCD screen with 20 meters of LEDs all around our living room.
Might want to check out LEDEDIT (I think I have the 2014 version with a T-1000S controller) Software lets you set up light shows however you want, also can do matrix's to make pictures

(I'm so doing a "waving" LED US flag on the side of my house
)
Yeah, those are nice. I am sure there are tons of other various controllers and options. I've seen a lot on amazon. But it's always more satisfying to do it yourself, almost from scratch. 🙂
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Sorry your thread got lost in the shuffle. If you still have yet to install this:

- Mount at top of wall, there should be about 2 1/2" of wood to screw to (you do not want to just screw only into drywall). This will allow you to mount the brackets anywhere along that line (you won't have to worry about the spacing of hitting the ceiling joists if you attached to the ceiling). It would be better to evenly space the brackets on each track though, as you will see the bracket lips sticking over the track.

- Use a long level, or better a laser level (even string if no other means), to align the brackets. Keep the track from touching the ceiling, as the ceiling plane may have inconsistencies or bulges here and there.

- Use "construction" or "drywall" screws minimum 1" long, not the supplied ones. Predrilling will ensure that the screw does not jockey in at an unpredicted angle and moving the bracket from your mark.
Sorry to bring up this old thread but wanted to clarify something.

I just went to Home Depot and tried to find a longer screw that would replace the supplied ones. Drywall screws seemed to be a bit large for the bracket. And the supplied screws seems to match the #4 ones in terms of thickness and head fit. However the longest one I've seen is 1 inch long. Would this be a sufficient to reach the "wood"?

Based on drywall sold in stores and some online googling it appears that the standard drywall thickness is about 1/2 inch. Which makes me believe that 1 inch screw should be sufficient. Am I thinking correctly?

PS: I managed to find 1-1/2 screw on amazon. Would this one be better? https://www.amazon.com/Stainless-Phillips-Screw-Bolt-Dropper/dp/B079Y8GNRV

Thanks for any response.
 

·
Hammered Thumb
Joined
·
2,743 Posts
Ah, don't buy stainless steel screws, unnessary cost.

Most drywall in most spots is 1/2" thick. You may have 5/8", and if it is a party wall with the neighbor apartment it may even have (2) layers of 5/8".

#4 shank seems like a really small pilot hole. I think #6 is the smallest shank for drywall screws, so I would just buy some boxes at HD of fine thread (may not get hung up as much as coarse thread on a tight hole in the aluminum) in a couple lengths ($4 for 1lb), then return the boxes you didn't use. Maybe even buy some wood screws if you need a pan head to not interfere with the cover.

If the holes are close enough on the track, it may hold well enough without going in any wood. Depends if its really hard to snap the cover on that you may loosen the screws in the drywall if you need to push at an angle.

Experimentation is key here. I speak from having bins of boxes of screws left over from odd jobs, but I understand wanting to get just what you need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Ah, don't buy stainless steel screws, unnessary cost.

Most drywall in most spots is 1/2" thick. You may have 5/8", and if it is a party wall with the neighbor apartment it may even have (2) layers of 5/8".

#4 shank seems like a really small pilot hole. I think #6 is the smallest shank for drywall screws, so I would just buy some boxes at HD of fine thread (may not get hung up as much as coarse thread on a tight hole in the aluminum) in a couple lengths ($4 for 1lb), then return the boxes you didn't use. Maybe even buy some wood screws if you need a pan head to not interfere with the cover.

If the holes are close enough on the track, it may hold well enough without going in any wood. Depends if its really hard to snap the cover on that you may loosen the screws in the drywall if you need to push at an angle.

Experimentation is key here. I speak from having bins of boxes of screws left over from odd jobs, but I understand wanting to get just what you need.
Ugh, mistakenly refreshed my browser and lost several paragraphs of typing. Will have to be brief now...

The tracks themselves are not getting attached to the wall directly, they have no holes. The included brackets are screwed onto the wall and then tracks are simply locked into place by those brackets. See the amazon link in my original post and this will be clearer. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06Y2Z8PST

I tried to use #6 screws (in the store) but the problem is that the head sticks out a bit (not flush with the bracket). My concerns is that it will prevent tracks to be securely locked and may fall off at some point.

The walls where I am attaching it are all within a single apartment. The lights will be in a living room. One of the walls is outside walls, another is a window wall and two others are against kitchen and hallway. I estimate the whole inside wall may be about 4 inches. I have attached quickly drawn apartment plan (not in scale obviously). Top and right are street. On the left is the kitchen and on the bottom are hallway and our stairs leading to first floor. Windows are at the top of the kitchen and right side of the living room. LED strips are run along the inner line in the living room marked LEDs.

Its really not about wanting to get just what you need but having little room for mistakes. Want to make sure I am making educated decisions. Have no luxury to experiment unfortunately. :(
 

Attachments

1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top