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yeah, right
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Discussion Starter #1
Getting power to shed located at other side of the house.

50A breaker in main panel
Run 6/3 NM from panel through the attic to the other side of the house
Come out of house about 12" above grade
Splice to 6/3 UF in junction box (mininum 35ci)
Over to shed, about 8 feet from house, in 1-1/2 PVC
Stub up through shed slab with PVC
Continue through shed about 15' with UF to subpanel location

Does this sound reasonable?
 

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Getting power to shed located at other side of the house.

50A breaker in main panel
Run 6/3 NM from panel through the attic to the other side of the house
Come out of house about 12" above grade
Splice to 6/3 UF in junction box (mininum 35ci)
Over to shed, about 8 feet from house, in 1-1/2 PVC
Stub up through shed slab with PVC
Continue through shed about 15' with UF to subpanel location

Does this sound reasonable?
Mostly OK, but two things. Why not take 6-3 UF all the way to the main panel and avoid the splice? Also, why not stub the pipe up in the slab at the location of the sub, instead of running for 15' inside?
 

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Getting power to shed located at other side of the house.

50A breaker in main panel
Run 6/3 NM from panel through the attic to the other side of the house
Come out of house about 12" above grade
Splice to 6/3 UF in junction box (mininum 35ci)
Over to shed, about 8 feet from house, in 1-1/2 PVC
Stub up through shed slab with PVC
Continue through shed about 15' with UF to subpanel location

Does this sound reasonable?
Do not put the UF in a conduit. Run individual conductors in the conduit. Like InPhase said, run the conduit underground and under the slab all the way to where the panel will be. That is if the slab is not already poured.
If its not poured, you can run as many conduits as needed under the slab and stub up for receptacle boxes and switch boxes. Most of your branch circuits. This saves on time and material.
I love to get in there before they pour the slab just for this reason. :thumbsup:
 

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yeah, right
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142 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Mostly OK, but two things. Why not take 6-3 UF all the way to the main panel and avoid the splice?
By the time I go up, across, and down its about a 75 foot run from the panel to the other side of the house. Using NM will save a few bucks, but it might not be worth it. If I don't have to splice I can skip the big junction box and run it out of the house through an LB.

Also, why not stub the pipe up in the slab at the location of the sub, instead of running for 15' inside?
That would be my first choice. I got hardpan to deal with. I'm going from the house to the shed with the least amount of digging. Its easier to drill a few holes in 2x4's than it is to dig.

I started digging this morning and ran into problems. I don't mind using a shovel, but having to use a 6' digging bar to chip away at it gets boring fast. I'm soaking it for a few hours and that might loosen it up. If I can't get down to 18", I'm thinking of using RMC instead.
 

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yeah, right
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142 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Do not put the UF in a conduit. Run individual conductors in the conduit.
If I do the entire run in UF from main panel to sub panel as InPhase suggested, I can avoid splices and junction boxes.

Like InPhase said, run the conduit underground and under the slab all the way to where the panel will be.
See above. But you're welcome come over and show me the finer points of shovelry.
That is if the slab is not already poured.
Not poured yet, which is why I want to get the conduit in place.

If its not poured, you can run as many conduits as needed under the slab and stub up for receptacle boxes and switch boxes. Most of your branch circuits. This saves on time and material.
I love to get in there before they pour the slab just for this reason. :thumbsup:
In this case, that's not going to be optimal. The shed isn't that big and I'm not sure where things are going to go yet, the time is mine, and I've got plenty of leftover 14-2, 14-3, and 12-2 to use up.
 

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Once you are to the slab, you don't have to be in the ground any longer. You just need to be under 2" of concrete. Once you reach the edge of the slab, let the pipe ride up out pf the ground and take it anywhere you wish.
 
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