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Never used anything like that.
All I can say as someone who can cut miters etc. I would not use it. I seems to be made for someone who has zero experience cutting wood or building anything. I have no idea how strong or sturdy it would be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Never used anything like that.
All I can say as someone who can cut miters etc. I would not use it. I seems to be made for someone who has zero experience cutting wood or building anything. I have no idea how strong or sturdy it would be.

Thanks for clarifications !!! I must've misread and thought that it does come with wood for framing :sad:
 

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Looks like a fun project.

It is a bit misleading though. The text states:

Only straight, 90 degree cuts are required
No miters or complex measurements are needed

Yet in the photo you can clearly see that the wood members are not cut at 90 degrees. No big deal, but I just wonder what else is not as it appears?

That being said, for a guy with little to no experience, and working by himself or just one helper... those brackets would be super helpful.

We had one of those small sheds at a home we bought in the late 1990's. It was a great space.

Good luck, keep us in the loop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Looks like a fun project.

It is a bit misleading though. The text states:
Only straight, 90 degree cuts are required
No miters or complex measurements are needed
Yet in the photo you can clearly see that the wood members are not cut at 90 degrees. No big deal, but I just wonder what else is not as it appears?

That being said, for a guy with little to no experience, and working by himself or just one helper... those brackets would be super helpful.

We had one of those small sheds at a home we bought in the late 1990's. It was a great space.

Good luck, keep us in the loop.

i did see it... i just ignored it:wink2:
as quite often happens - those that design and build aren't those that write manuals ...
 

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Never used anything like that.
All I can say as someone who can cut miters etc. I would not use it. I seems to be made for someone who has zero experience cutting wood or building anything. I have no idea how strong or sturdy it would be.
It makes for a very strong building. Ever used hurricane ties? The brackets hold the pieces parts in position. And since nails have a tendency to loosen over time, the brackets tend to minimize that.
 

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Big Dog
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I suggest you just build a good old fashioned gable roof shed.

There are relatively simple to construct and plenty of videos online that show how to build one or you can get a kit starting at about $1200 for an 8'x8' model

In 2003 I built my 10'x12' shed from scratch.

If memory serves I paid about $1300 for the supplies including the gravel for the base, pier blocks and hardware. Accounting for inflation that would be about $1800-$1900 today.

It took me about 5-6 weekends to build.
 
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Those brackets got me thinking. I've been redesigning a boat cover frame and plan to use plywood brackets which do the same thing. The idea is to bolt them together, instead of using nails or screws, so the whole thing can be disassembled and stowed for the summer.

Of course, if I could just buy the brackets, rather than make them, that would save some time. Hmmm.
 

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Maintenance / Locksmith
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Just completed an 8' x 10' shed with gambrel roof. I purchased plans from icreatables.com. Sided with Hardi Plank over OSB and upgraded roof shingles to meet HOA approvals. I stick built everything including the trusses and added a window and an underground power feed for LED lights and plugs. I have $2,580 invested and still need to paint it. The plans exceeded my expectations. I used Tuff Block for ground support rather than concrete blocks.
 

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If I read that right, it's 52 pieces of steel for $59. That seems awfully cheap. I would expect those steel brackets to be very thin and flimsy. By comparison check out the prices for basic Simpson Strong Ties at Home Depot. I think You can do better on your own.
 

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If I read that right, it's 52 pieces of steel for $59. That seems awfully cheap. I would expect those steel brackets to be very thin and flimsy. By comparison check out the prices for basic Simpson Strong Ties at Home Depot. I think You can do better on your own.
The kit has special one piece brackets that attach the upper and lower roof joists and holds them at the correct angle. Simpson doesn't have anything like that.

For a guy that doesn't even want to miter the boards, the kit is based on keeping it simple.
 

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retired framer
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The kit has special one piece brackets that attach the upper and lower roof joists and holds them at the correct angle. Simpson doesn't have anything like that.

For a guy that doesn't even want to miter the boards, the kit is based on keeping it simple.

The screws look like drywall screws. :surprise:
 
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