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Not exactly sure what you mean by that.

This guy is a pro, building multi million dollar homes in Texas and is a real guru when it comes to air sealing, water-proofing, (not only in the sense of keeping water out, but also in the sense of design and construction to allow any water that gets in a way to dry), and overall energy efficiency.

He shows a situation that seems in all ways similar to the OP's situation and the product he's showing here has a low enough viscosity to be forced between the the sheathing and the foundation, short of the sheathing being crushed into the foundation. If you look further down the wall in the video you can see that the Zip sheathing is touching the foundation. There's many other ways of doing this with other products, and it's simple enough to do that you don't need to be a "pro."

So what, exactly is going on here that you deem "pretty unprofessional?"
He's not a pro he's a salesman or a product rep. Anyone can just go out and buy some polyurethane and do that.

He didn't talk about the fact that the foundation was so off that the framers had to recess the plate way back from the edge.

In working with siding now, you do not caulk the bottom allowing water to get out. The new theories about building.... is eventually water is going to get in so allow it to get out.

Might stop bugs...so who knows.
It just looked unprofessional. Probably has about a 20 year life and then what? Pull your siding off and recaulk?

I'm not buying it.
 

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walt1122
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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Not exactly sure what you mean by that.

This guy is a pro, building multi million dollar homes in Texas and is a real guru when it comes to air sealing, water-proofing, (not only in the sense of keeping water out, but also in the sense of design and construction to allow any water that gets in a way to dry), and overall energy efficiency.

He shows a situation that seems in all ways similar to the OP's situation and the product he's showing here has a low enough viscosity to be forced between the the sheathing and the foundation, short of the sheathing being crushed i
Not exactly sure what you mean by that.

This guy is a pro, building multi million dollar homes in Texas and is a real guru when it comes to air sealing, water-proofing, (not only in the sense of keeping water out, but also in the sense of design and construction to allow any water that gets in a way to dry), and overall energy efficiency.

He shows a situation that seems in all ways similar to the OP's situation and the product he's showing here has a low enough viscosity to be forced between the the sheathing and the foundation, short of the sheathing being crushed into the foundation. If you look further down the wall in the video you can see that the Zip sheathing is touching the foundation. There's many other ways of doing this with other products, and it's simple enough to do that you don't need to be a "pro."

So what, exactly is going on here that you deem "pretty unprofessional?"
nto the foundation. If you look further down the wall in the video you can see that the Zip sheathing is touching the foundation. There's many other ways of doing this with other products, and it's simple enough to do that you don't need to be a "pro."

So what, exactly is going on here that you deem "pretty unprofessional?"
Hi Guys, I watch Matt every chance I get. Didn't see this one till now. Thanks. It is close to what I want to do. His plan using it to keep out bugs from entering. Mine is to seal the joint plus protect the exposed OSB unprotected edge from moisture and will certainly help in sealing the house from drafts. I have the ZIP tape and a couple of ZIP sausages I got off of eBay. No caulking tube gun to apply the caulk yet at least 50 bucks for it so I didn't want to spend for it just yet. Thought I could use a spreader if I had to and apply into joints than smooth it out. I do have as I mentioned, quite a few tubes of a rubberized caulk used for installing windows and doors. Use it as a test and it seems to work really well. Just don't know the longevity, seems to do what I want. I saw a special tape designed to be used for concrete that look interesting. Think it would be even better than the ZIP tape. Very expensive so I'm still thinking about it. Back half of the house will be a *****. Ten plus feet off of the ground so I need ladders or need to break out scaffolding to have a safe platform to help create room for the grout. Don't like using a circular saw this high up and so off balance. Just more work than I think I want to do. If they used the ribbed foam like I tried to get them to do we wouldn't be here. I get the doors this week? or more likely next week, window guy hasn't called yet but ya' never know.. Will be good to get it more secure. thanks for the new info. Walt
 

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He's not a pro he's a salesman or a product rep. Anyone can just go out and buy some polyurethane and do that.

He didn't talk about the fact that the foundation was so off that the framers had to recess the plate way back from the edge.

In working with siding now, you do not caulk the bottom allowing water to get out. The new theories about building.... is eventually water is going to get in so allow it to get out.

Might stop bugs...so who knows.
It just looked unprofessional. Probably has about a 20 year life and then what? Pull your siding off and recaulk?

I'm not buying it.
No, he's a pro, both from the standpoint of building plenty of houses and from the standpoint of really knowing the science behind well-built houses. I'm not exactly sure what the "polyurethane" reference means; from the standpoint of the OP's question the point of my post is that sealing up that joint is important and beneficial in a variety of ways, and I referenced one way to do it. The Zip Liquid Seal is extremely waterproof but I'm sure there are other products that might also be used.

No he didn't talk about the other stuff you mention because he was talking about one thing - a product and a process you could to seal the junction of the foundation and the sheathing - and he was at another builder's project, so criticizing that builder's workmanship and publicizing it on YouTube would be kinda stupid, don't you think?

We're not talking about "siding" here, we're talking about "sheathing", so I don't see how that's at all relevant to this conversation. He was very clear that you wanted to get the product covered (with siding) because it didn't like the sunlight. Once covered I assume it would last the life of the house - it has a 30 year warranty, same as Hardie siding,.
 

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walt1122
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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
He's not a pro he's a salesman or a product rep. Anyone can just go out and buy some polyurethane and do that.

He didn't talk about the fact that the foundation was so off that the framers had to recess the plate way back from the edge.

In working with siding now, you do not caulk the bottom allowing water to get out. The new theories about building.... is eventually water is going to get in so allow it to get out.

Might stop bugs...so who knows.
It just looked unprofessional. Probably has about a 20 year life and then what? Pull your siding off and recaulk?

I'm not buying it.
I'm on the fence here.I hear your point Matt1963 that, yes, you always give water a way to get out. Under the bottom of windows, under the siding before it hits the top of windows or doors and anyplace where it is likely to get a way into the house. And that is the point. If it gets behind siding you want it to travel down the wall ouside of the tarpaper ( old school), outside of the Tyvec ( most common way currently of controlling moisture) and in this case ZIP board with the waterproof coating letting the water flow down OUTSIDE. The idea for the ZIP system using the ZIP tape or ZIP caulk that will allow it to run down the outside hopefully never getting to the OSB underside. The 6 mm plastic they used on my house just runs up the side of the house from under the sill up between the joist banding and the OSB sheathing. If water gets there it could sit and rot the framing. You got big problems if the water gets behind the sheathing. Nobody except the guys who put it on and the guys who install the siding will ever see the unsightly seam of caulk. I've seen some pretty brittle tar paper after being on a house for umteen years and I'm sure the staples and tape holding the Tyvec on, the staples and/or the tape don't last forever either. In both cases they could give water an entry point behind the tar paper/Tyvec to the sheathing. If water does run down the wall it encounters the waterproofing membrane of the ZIP sheathing and in this case the caulk along the bottom ( I would cover the caulk with ZIP tape when done) I will go with the newer technology. I've seen caulk exposed to UV and some tough weather last quite a while. This new rubberized stuff looks pretty promising. Just my two cents. Thanks Walt
 

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I'm on the fence here.I hear your point Matt1963 that, yes, you always give water a way to get out. Under the bottom of windows, under the siding before it hits the top of windows or doors and anyplace where it is likely to get a way into the house. And that is the point. If it gets behind siding you want it to travel down the wall ouside of the tarpaper ( old school), outside of the Tyvec ( most common way currently of controlling moisture) and in this case ZIP board with the waterproof coating letting the water flow down OUTSIDE. The idea for the ZIP system using the ZIP tape or ZIP caulk that will allow it to run down the outside hopefully never getting to the OSB underside. The 6 mm plastic they used on my house just runs up the side of the house from under the sill up between the joist banding and the OSB sheathing. If water gets there it could sit and rot the framing. You got big problems if the water gets behind the sheathing. Nobody except the guys who put it on and the guys who install the siding will ever see the unsightly seam of caulk. I've seen some pretty brittle tar paper after being on a house for umteen years and I'm sure the staples and tape holding the Tyvec on, the staples and/or the tape don't last forever either. In both cases they could give water an entry point behind the tar paper/Tyvec to the sheathing. If water does run down the wall it encounters the waterproofing membrane of the ZIP sheathing and in this case the caulk along the bottom ( I would cover the caulk with ZIP tape when done) I will go with the newer technology. I've seen caulk exposed to UV and some tough weather last quite a while. This new rubberized stuff looks pretty promising. Just my two cents. Thanks Walt
Walt
How far up the wall does the six mil plastic behind the sheeting run?
 

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Where I am if the sheathing touches this foundation concrete, you fail. Nice and simple. No worries.
Well I've torn into a lot of old and newer poorly constructed houses and I'm telling you haven't scene some giant problem there so not sure why people are so focused on that. A house takes a lot of time and money so, in my humble opinion it's better to focus elsewhere.
 

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walt1122
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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
Well I've torn into a lot of old and newer poorly constructed houses and I'm telling you haven't scene some giant problem there so not sure why people are so focused on that. A house takes a lot of time and money so, in my humble opinion it's better to focus elsewhere.
But it is like a poorly installed roof. You won't see the problems for many years till the wood around the poorly applied flashing rots away or the ice gets up under the shingles and because they didn't apply or poorly applied the rubber membrane the house leaks as the ice melts. It all matters. Once the paint is dry and the pictures hung it is too late. And exactly for the reasons you stated. I got a lot invested in this I'm concerned with everything that doesn't look right.. thanks Walt
 

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But it is like a poorly installed roof. You won't see the problems for many years till the wood around the poorly applied flashing rots away or the ice gets up under the shingles and because they didn't apply or poorly applied the rubber membrane the house leaks as the ice melts. It all matters. Once the paint is dry and the pictures hung it is too late. And exactly for the reasons you stated. I got a lot invested in this I'm concerned with everything that doesn't look right.. thanks Walt
Where the roof ends and the sheathing stops are two different animals.....

Overall, do what you like or what you think works best, it your house.

I'm sure it will come out nice.
 

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walt1122
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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
That in itself shouldn’t be a problem. If you cut a saw kerf to get the sheeting off the concrete you can cut the plastic so it is not a closed sack.
Yes that had been and option from the start. But as Matt1963 and I can agree on is at some point you have to say to yourself "how much is to much" and just move on. . I came here just to get a consensus or actual real world experience or best yet a code that would say leave a gap or we don't care. I got all of the above so I thank everyone for their input and yes I hope to find the time and the pins for my scaffolding to safely build a platform to get to the top of the cement blocks and cut a slot between the wood and the block or some method to allow me to get some caulk in there. Cover/protect the exposed edge of the OSB from the blocks and start putting in the doors. They just delivered two of the 5 exterior doors tonight. Take care all

Walt
 
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