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walt1122
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All, New construction in Tennessee. No building codes, no inspectors in out county. I'm looking at an issue I think will develop over time and ask you to comment on it and offer possible solution if you think necessary.

Zip siding 7/16 green board. is touching the cement blocks of the foundation. This is the raw edge! Won't moisture wick up over time and cause premature rot of the OSB? All they put between the pressure treated sill and the block was a 6 mm plastic film but ran it up the side behind the OSB. I'm having trouble getting my phone to send the picture to anywhere I can get it to put here. Hope you can understand what I'm saying with out the picture. I even bought the rolls of pink/blue ribbed foam for the to use but somehow the stuff disappeared (over $100 bucks ) and nobody knows what happened.

Everything I'm coming up with involves tons of work and added expense. And I already have way way too much of the builders screw ups already to fix. He won't do it and we are going round and round. I pay for stuff and he brings in some shoddy butchers posing as carpenters and then I have to fix things. Had a crew install my high end Anderson windows and with at least 5 or 6 you have to muscle up and down cause they are so racked in the rough openings.

Any thought on the OSB? am I over reacting? There is no vapor barrier or any thing in the crawl space to keep the moisture out and this is the South. I see problems over time.

thanks

Walt
 

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Hi All, New construction in Tennessee. No building codes, no inspectors in out county. I'm looking at an issue I think will develop over time and ask you to comment on it and offer possible solution if you think necessary.

Zip siding 7/16 green board. is touching the cement blocks of the foundation. This is the raw edge! Won't moisture wick up over time and cause premature rot of the OSB? All they put between the pressure treated sill and the block was a 6 mm plastic film but ran it up the side behind the OSB. I'm having trouble getting my phone to send the picture to anywhere I can get it to put here. Hope you can understand what I'm saying with out the picture. I even bought the rolls of pink/blue ribbed foam for the to use but somehow the stuff disappeared (over $100 bucks ) and nobody knows what happened.

Everything I'm coming up with involves tons of work and added expense. And I already have way way too much of the builders screw ups already to fix. He won't do it and we are going round and round. I pay for stuff and he brings in some shoddy butchers posing as carpenters and then I have to fix things. Had a crew install my high end Anderson windows and with at least 5 or 6 you have to muscle up and down cause they are so racked in the rough openings.

Any thought on the OSB? am I over reacting? There is no vapor barrier or any thing in the crawl space to keep the moisture out and this is the South. I see problems over time.

thanks

Walt
Well, 1st screw up shame on them, second screw up shame me I always say. Time to get some new guys.

As for your questions, hard to even understand.
 

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walt1122
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501 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Zip sheeting is different than normal OSB believe it is made with different glue and denser and water resistant. As long as it is flush and the block is not out beyond should be ok.
Most of it's water protection comes from the green waterproof facing. There are a few pieces of scrap left over from the install sitting in the scrap pile. They are swelling and disintergrating from the back and sides first. That is why they use the ZIP tape to cover the joints from getting any water on it as part of the install.
 

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retired framer
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Yeah that is what I'm coming up with, too
We would do the sheet poly in the crawlspace after the roof is on as it could rain and fill up the crawls space and you would have a bigger problem.
Rolls of sill gasket will leave the site in the direction the wind is blowing unless they are stored properly. Sheet poly is acceptable, use it all the time when short of gasket material.
I would be more worried about splash up water than wicking. How close is the sheeting to the the ground at it's lowest?
 

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walt1122
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501 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, 1st screw up shame on them, second screw up shame me I always say. Time to get some new guys.

As for your questions, hard to even understand.
Sorry i will try again. Top cement block has the pressure treated 2 x 6 sill plate sitting on it. Between the sill plate and the cement block they put a piece of 6 mm plastic as a vapor barrier running it up the outside covering the sill and 2 x 12 perimiter pieces of pine holding up the floor joists. Following me so far? Now the sill plate is normally recessed from the outside wall the 7/16 of an inch to allow the ZIP 4 x 8 sheet to sit on that edge and cover the exterior framing making up the wall. . However I thought there should be a separation between the top of the cement block and the ZIP sheet. Water/moisture can wick throug the cement blocks and wet the ZIP sheets on the unprotected side. Hope this helps. I can use my camera to take the picture to an SD card and post it tomorrow.
 

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retired framer
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Sorry i will try again. Top cement block has the pressure treated 2 x 6 sill plate sitting on it. Between the sill plate and the cement block they put a piece of 6 mm plastic as a vapor barrier running it up the outside covering the sill and 2 x 12 perimiter pieces of pine holding up the floor joists. Following me so far? Now the sill plate is normally recessed from the outside wall the 7/16 of an inch to allow the ZIP 4 x 8 sheet to sit on that edge and cover the exterior framing making up the wall. . However I thought there should be a separation between the top of the cement block and the ZIP sheet. Water/moisture can wick throug the cement blocks and wet the ZIP sheets on the unprotected side. Hope this helps. I can use my camera to take the picture to an SD card and post it tomorrow.
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Sorry i will try again. Top cement block has the pressure treated 2 x 6 sill plate sitting on it. Between the sill plate and the cement block they put a piece of 6 mm plastic as a vapor barrier running it up the outside covering the sill and 2 x 12 perimiter pieces of pine holding up the floor joists. Following me so far? Now the sill plate is normally recessed from the outside wall the 7/16 of an inch to allow the ZIP 4 x 8 sheet to sit on that edge and cover the exterior framing making up the wall. . However I thought there should be a separation between the top of the cement block and the ZIP sheet. Water/moisture can wick throug the cement blocks and wet the ZIP sheets on the unprotected side. Hope this helps. I can use my camera to take the picture to an SD card and post it tomorrow.
No I get it.

Sill plates aren't always set back from the foundation....at least not where I'm from. Some set in so the sheathing is flush (your case I guess) and some run by. I think overall the siding will give you protection there but anything can happen. Like Neal says above, I would be more concerned about stuff that is close to the ground possibly where your foundation walls step....if they do indeed step.

I've never seen anyone treating the ends of regular osb.
 

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walt1122
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501 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
We would do the sheet poly in the crawlspace after the roof is on as it could rain and fill up the crawls space and you would have a bigger problem.
Rolls of sill gasket will leave the site in the direction the wind is blowing unless they are stored properly. Sheet poly is acceptable, use it all the time when short of gasket material.
I would be more worried about splash up water than wicking. How close is the sheeting to the the ground at it's lowest?
Yeah, I bought the 20' x 100' 6 mm black plastic but they left big holes around the piers and along the perimeter so I have to work on getting it a better base to use the poly.
The rolls were in a couple of Lowes bags and I tired to explain to the Hispanic non-english speaking worker that they should use them.
I had to fix a mis-match at the front door entry way. The were an inch and a half inside the block with the sill 2 x 6 and the they were another inch or so inside of the sill plate with the sheathing stopping on top of the sill plate.. I didn't see any poly anywhere. Had to shim it all back out to where it belonged. Builder didn't think it was a problem the way they did the wall. Nobody would see it? after the Hardie board siding went up. This is just one of many screw-ups.
 

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retired framer
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No I get it.

Sill plates aren't always set back from the foundation....at least not where I'm from. Some set in so the sheathing is flush (your case I guess) and some run by. I think overall the siding will give you protection there but anything can happen. Like Neal says above, I would be more concerned about stuff that is close to the ground possibly where your foundation walls step....if they do indeed step.

I've never seen anyone treating the ends of regular osb.
We put a 1x2 in the top of the form for concrete which leaves room for the sheeting to go down 1" with out touching concrete.
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retired framer
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yep exactly. Nothing under the ZIP sheet that is sitting on the block. But as I just mentioned I have found at least one spot about 4 feet long where I don't see any poly. I will have to go in the crawl space to see if there are any othe places where it isn't installed.
We do gasket or something but in many places they call fro treated instead of poly so you are going for the best of bot, I would not be to concerned about that missing.
i have seen many rotting sill plates, but we can always find a reason, water splash up under the siding, leaks from above.
Or dirt to close to the bottom of the siding, never anything we had to blame on wicking.
I understand you concern but I don't think you house is in great danger for either.
The sheet poly in the crawl space needs to be sealed to the concrete and pipes.
 

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walt1122
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501 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
No I get it.

Sill plates aren't always set back from the foundation....at least not where I'm from. Some set in so the sheathing is flush (your case I guess) and some run by. I think overall the siding will give you protection there but anything can happen. Like Neal says above, I would be more concerned about stuff that is close to the ground possibly where your foundation walls step....if they do indeed step.

I've never seen anyone treating the ends of regular osb.
Yeah I get the concern about the closeness to the ground . Doesn't code say like 10 inches? But yes the front of the house is close to the ground. We are old and don't want many steps. I've seen the "run over" and see what you mean.But I would think that direct contact sitting on the block is a problem waiting to happen.
The walls meander in and out. From just inside of the block work to 3/4 ths of an inch or so out beyond the cement wall. Can't wait to look down the wall after the siding has been applied. Add to this in a couple of places they left the ZIP sheets overlaping each other and just ran the tape over the visible bulge in the wall.
 

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Yeah I get the concern about the closeness to the ground . Doesn't code say like 10 inches? But yes the front of the house is close to the ground. We are old and don't want many steps. I've seen the "run over" and see what you mean.But I would think that direct contact sitting on the block is a problem waiting to happen.
The walls meander in and out. From just inside of the block work to 3/4 ths of an inch or so out beyond the cement wall. Can't wait to look down the wall after the siding has been applied. Add to this in a couple of places they left the ZIP sheets overlaping each other and just ran the tape over the visible bulge in the wall.
Earth to wood contact where I am is 6 inches but I always tell my clients 12 inches is better.

The reason why? I come back years later and landscapers have done all kinds of stupid stuff.
 

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walt1122
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
We put a 1x2 in the top of the form for concrete which leaves room for the sheeting to go down 1" with out touching concrete.
View attachment 712305
Yeah, I like that. Or just do like you do with sheetrock. the first course is up off of the floor 3/4 - 1 inch. Piece of 1 X would do the trick. Take it away when you are done and use again on the next ZIP sheet. Then if you are anal like me, put some caulk up in there to further separate the ZIP from the block.
 

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retired framer
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Crazy, no one does that around here but there is nothing wrong with that detail.....just not sure it's necessary.

I haven't seen giant amounts of failure there and I live in Seattle. (Damp)
Its bean done here by everyone since I was a kid. We use rental forms of what ever height so the 1/2 is our level strip for the top of the concrete.
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