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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone,

I live in an old schoolhouse (built 1924) and am currently in the process of residing the place. The plan was to remove the tattered 90s vinyl siding to reveal the condition of the original wood clapboards. Well, the clapboards had been neglected over the years, as many are unsalvageable. Someone even tied in various pieces of plywood (probably to replace some deteriorated clapboards).

The actual sheathing is horizontal T&G 1x6s, which have also seen some deterioration over the years (voids and checks etc). Some of the sheathing has also been replaced with various plywood. Further, there are a few windows that have been removed and then boarded over with plywood! This is the north side of the house, which explains all the deterioration.

So I'd like to prepare this wall for residing with new cedar clapboards, but I'm not sure if I should:

A) Go through and meticulously replace all compromised sheathing, seal up any cracks and voids in the sheathing, and also replace and seal the plywood over the old window openings

B) Sheath over top everything with new 7/16 OSB (or something similar)

I've read that placing new sheathing over old sheathing is done sometimes, but what are your thoughts? I should also mention, the house no longer gets water damage. The vinyl siding did a great job keeping the water out over the years. All this damage appears to have occurred prior to the 90s. Thanks for any advice!
 

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I have done it by adding a layer of OSB over the existing T&G. It makes a nice firm nailing surface.
 
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Can/would you restore the sheathing, keeping the good pieces and replacing the deteriorated pieces?

It would be a little more difficult if the 1x6s from back then were not the same 3/4" x 5-1/2" actual dimensions of today; you would need to do some power planing.

Then install clapboards comparable to what was there original, probably need to replace all of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies. I'm new to this forum, so I hope I attached the photos correctly. In one of the photos, you can see the current cedar siding on the left, (done about 5 years ago). Now it's time to do the rest of the house.

There are voids/spaces in the current sheathing, and some of it is water damaged to the point that it gives when you press it. Interestingly, the sheathing is 7/8" thick, which must be how it was milled in the 1920s.

I also included a pic of how the window projects 1 5/8" beyond the sheathing. How this happened, I don't know. But my thought is, if I layer 7/16" OSB on top, the window won't project as bad once the casing is in place. Then it serves the dual purpose of covering the voids and adding a good flat nailing surface for the wood siding.

Mostly, my only concern with adding 7/16" OSB, is preventing moisture from migrating outwards (any moisture that may occur within the walls). Thanks for your thoughts on this. Also, great forum here!
 

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Best if you go back to the original 1x6, remove everything else, ply patches, etc, insulate the stud bays, cover with 1" (better if 1.5" or thicker but more work furring everything out) xps foam boards, seal the joints against air leaks, cover with house wrap (tyvek or tar paper) and side. If wood siding, also best if you leave some air gap behind the siding. Replace the windows also. It's ok to have all of these done just the north wall. Every bit helps.



The original 1x6 looks ok in the photos. Do you think they'll hold nails? I would remove the patches and cover with tarpaper from bottom up to weatherize the wall. Lots of 1/2" staples and some temp cleats over them.



I have a question for you. Sure would appreciate any answer. I see thin foam sheets there. Do you think that's from the 90's? I'm curious about the red tape, mostly. It looks good still and I'm wondering if the tape worked until now. How do they peel? Do they feel sticky still?


BTW, if wood siding and using air nailers, better to cover with ply. With boards, nails may hit the gaps and you may not feel the misses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
carpdad,

Thanks for the info. Some of the sheathing is questionable; whether it would hold nails for the long run. The house has been well insulated with batten insulation from the inside. I'll consider the exterior foam insulation method though. I'll have to reassess if it will work with the rest of the plan. If not, it seems the OSB idea will do just fine.

That thin pink foam you see is actually fanfold 1/4" foam I tacked up there to keep water from getting in after I removed the vinyl siding. So the red tape is less than a year old. I will tell you though, when I removed the vinyl, the installers used a similar green 1/4" foam. It was in great shape for the most part, and the tape they used was still hanging on nearly perfect after all these years. I did notice that they skipped some of the seams when taping though! Not sure what's up with that, but the mysteries abound when renovating old places.
 

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I wold replace all of the boards that are soft to have give. A question of not holding nails means it's rotted.
 
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