DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all! I recently had a service disconnect installed in my home and would like to know if it has been wired correctly. The electrician I hired seemed like he didn't know what he was doing and my lights now dim when the furnace kicks on...they didn't do this before! I'm thinking it might be a grounding issue, so I roughed up a crude diagram for y'all to look at. The service disconnect is directly below the meter outside the house which is grounded with the existing ground rod. Inside the house, the service panel was grounded to the city water pipe.
The electrician used 4/0-3 aluminum SEU to run from the disconnect to the main service panel inside. I'm pretty sure the bonding is correct in the disconnect (neutral to ground), but should there be an extra ground introduced in the service panel? He ran a 4AWG solid copper line from the inside service panel to the water line which wasn't there before. Is this correct?
 

Attachments

·
Wire Chewer
Joined
·
3,579 Posts
That looks ok to me, neutral is not bonded to ground indoors, which is correct because it is bonded outside already. Everything else looks ok too. The only thing I'm not sure about is if there should be a grounding point outside and inside, or if they need to be both at same place.

If lights are dimming it may be a loose connection somewhere, at least that would be my guess. We'll see what the more qualified people say.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That looks ok to me, neutral is not bonded to ground indoors, which is correct because it is bonded outside already. Everything else looks ok too. The only thing I'm not sure about is if there should be a grounding point outside and inside, or if they need to be both at same place.

If lights are dimming it may be a loose connection somewhere, at least that would be my guess. We'll see what the more qualified people say.
Thanks Red! I didn't think about a loose connection somewhere, that makes sense. I'm also unsure about the grounding points. I remember vaguely reading something about not introducing another ground to a system...something about altering the potential and making the system dangerous for the user. I'm afraid the whole setup may be wrong.
 

·
" Euro " electrician
Joined
·
5,369 Posts
I will step in here and that drawing is correct for USA side.

But there is one isssue did that electrician actually use the SEU or SER? that make the diffrence on exterial disconnection switch.

The most common for lights blinking or tempory dimming is useally loose connection or improper toqured screws or lugs on the conductor connectors.

Have that electrician come back and double check the connection to make sure they are not loose.

The SEU cable is oval shaped while SER is round shape that will affect the whole thing.

If I am right that you have 200 amp service? { Overhead or Underground ?}

Merci,
Marc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I will step in here and that drawing is correct for USA side.

But there is one isssue did that electrician actually use the SEU or SER? that make the diffrence on exterial disconnection switch.

The most common for lights blinking or tempory dimming is useally loose connection or improper toqured screws or lugs on the conductor connectors.

Have that electrician come back and double check the connection to make sure they are not loose.

The SEU cable is oval shaped while SER is round shape that will affect the whole thing.

If I am right that you have 200 amp service? { Overhead or Underground ?}

Merci,
Marc
Yeah, that's my fault...it's 4/0-3 SER Aluminum...I mistyped. It is also 200A Overhead. Would it be a bad idea for me to attempt to retorque the connections? If it would be okay, what should I torque the main lugs to and what should I torque the individual branch circuits to? I kinda feel bad now, saying that it didn't seem like he knew what he was doing, seems to me like everything is okay...just a loose connection.
 

·
Master Electrician
Joined
·
4,603 Posts
Hi all! I recently had a service disconnect installed in my home and would like to know if it has been wired correctly. The electrician I hired seemed like he didn't know what he was doing and my lights now dim when the furnace kicks on...they didn't do this before! I'm thinking it might be a grounding issue, so I roughed up a crude diagram for y'all to look at. The service disconnect is directly below the meter outside the house which is grounded with the existing ground rod. Inside the house, the service panel was grounded to the city water pipe.
The electrician used 4/0-3 aluminum SEU to run from the disconnect to the main service panel inside. I'm pretty sure the bonding is correct in the disconnect (neutral to ground), but should there be an extra ground introduced in the service panel? He ran a 4AWG solid copper line from the inside service panel to the water line which wasn't there before. Is this correct?
If I was doing this installation, the water pipe ground would be at the disconnect, not at the panel.
 

·
Licensed Electrical Cont.
Joined
·
7,829 Posts
If I was doing this installation, the water pipe ground would be at the disconnect, not at the panel.
I agree.

I will say that "grounding", as in service grounding, has absolutely nothing to do with the day to day operation of the system. So any flickering or dimming is NOT caused by a grounding problem.
 

·
Licensed electrician
Joined
·
13,396 Posts
If I was doing this installation, the water pipe ground would be at the disconnect, not at the panel.
I agree with Speedy and Brric. Also the bond should not be installed inside.
 

·
Licensed electrician
Joined
·
13,396 Posts
Jim, IMHO the ground should be bonded at the panel, not the neutral however.
I stand corrected. I saw the word bond and misinterpreted what was being bonded.
 

·
UAW SKILLED TRADES
Joined
·
5,341 Posts
If I was doing this installation, the water pipe ground would be at the disconnect, not at the panel.
Yep .. IMO subsection 250.24 requires the GEC system to be terminated to the neutral buss where the service grounded conductor is terminated .. not to a grounding bus in a panel load side of the service equipment. The service equipment now being the new outside disconnect.

I do not think it is a major issue but just saying....
 

·
" Euro " electrician
Joined
·
5,369 Posts
I agree with Speedy and Brric. Also the bond should not be installed inside.
That one thing with all main disconnection location the bonding will be at the firstmost disconnect switch.

I just got one done not too long ago someone use the old steam pipe as bonding and I have to fix that mess :censored: { took a better part of day to move that EGC.}

Merci.
Marc
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top