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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,
I have a metal building on a concrete slab in a very rural area of South West Texas.
I am going to build a conventional framed guest quarters inside, which will be against an inside wall of the metal building (the term recently being used is Barndominium).
Because the slab was not poured with a septic pipe exit, like a normal house slab, I will run the PVC Toilet drain and grey water out one side of the metal building, and into a legal conventional septic tank.
My question: Is this setup out the side, OK by a typical building codes, keeping in mind, it is not a house, but a metal building, and in rural America.
Thanks for the help
 

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I don't know the answer, but I'm guessing you want to do this so that you don't have to jack hammer a whole in the cement for the pipe right?
 

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You mention building code and rural. Does you jurisdiction enforce a building code. If so, they're the ones you have to keep happy.

Unless you are planning to build up a raised floor or bust up the concrete, how do you plan to get the necessary drainage slope from the base of the toilet?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You mention building code and rural. Does you jurisdiction enforce a building code. If so, they're the ones you have to keep happy.

Unless you are planning to build up a raised floor or bust up the concrete, how do you plan to get the necessary drainage slope from the base of the toilet?
The bathroom will be on a raised floor. Out here, most people do things themselves, as it is extremely rural....cattle outnumber humans at least 100 to 1.
I did take the time to get an actual state approved septic system, but most do that themselves, as with electrical, plumbing, etc...
I personally have not heard of a county building inspector ever being out here.
The ranch is private property with a private road from the highway, with the ranch house sitting over 8 miles back.
Basically, I'm just curious if plumbing can be ran out the side of a residential building, and still be within average building codes, as I'm sure codes run different from state to state?
Thanks for the help
 

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Discussion Starter #7
How far from he outside to the bath room? how thick is the floor? Is there a well near by?
The bathroom will be adjacent to the metal building outside wall, so the outside to the bathroom may be only 2 or 3 feet. the slab is 5" thick, the raised floor will probably be 3/4 inch plywood on 2x6 joist with 16" center. I'll use the thick plywood, simply because I have a lot of it lying around, and there is a well with gravity feed to the building, water flow and pressure is not an issue
Thanks for the help
 

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The bathroom will be adjacent to the metal building outside wall, so the outside to the bathroom may be only 2 or 3 feet. the slab is 5" thick, the raised floor will probably be 3/4 inch plywood on 2x6 joist with 16" center. I'll use the thick plywood, simply because I have a lot of it lying around, and there is a well with gravity feed to the building, water flow and pressure is not an issue
Thanks for the help
Here the septic system needs to be certain distance for the well The design of the system seems to change with soil condition and type.
I doubt you can get a toilet to work with 2x6 joists, I would go thu the concrete, it is not a big deal.
 

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The bathroom will be adjacent to the metal building outside wall, so the outside to the bathroom may be only 2 or 3 feet. the slab is 5" thick, the raised floor will probably be 3/4 inch plywood on 2x6 joist with 16" center. I'll use the thick plywood, simply because I have a lot of it lying around, and there is a well with gravity feed to the building, water flow and pressure is not an issue
Thanks for the help
I think Neals point was if there was a proximity issue between the well and septic bed; there are rules (or at least guidelines) to prevent well contaminations. If it is a surface or dug well, it is something I would be concerned about if it is too close. It sounds like there is no meaningful code enforcement out your way. I can't see any difference with waste lines going out the side of a building vs. underground, but I'll leave it to the pros here to fill in the technical points about required slope, etc.
 

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I built a bathroom in a barn at my farm. The shower and toilet are on a 2x6 platform, one step up from the concrete floor. Outside the bathroom in the barn I connected all the drain pipes and ran it out of the building above grade. Then it turns and parallels the building against the outside wall, goin below grade just before it gets beyond the back wall. I am not aware of anything in our code prohibiting it. Does your building meet other requirements, like openings for emergency egress? Is the living quarters the entire building?
 
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Having grew up in that area, I know that the Sun has a mean streak.

And I also know that exposed PVC sewer pipe deteriorates in direct sunlight, So I suggest that you cover any exposed piping well.

As for a code enforcement, I would call the County office to find out if I need permits, and get the regulations straight, before " rednecking" this.

I am not insinuating anything, just advising that you make it legal from the get-go.

ED
 

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If the pipes are not buried far enough below ground they will freeze in winter.
 

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They make toilets that exit horizontally out through a wall - no subflooring required. You can run your vanity drains and supplies outside if you wish also <<--- That's assuming you are not subject to freezing. If you have freezing you can built an insulated box around the exposed pipes and use vent inside to open that new insulated box to the warmth of the rest of the bathroom.
 

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If the pipes are not buried far enough below ground they will freeze in winter.
In West Texas, the winter is more like a Spring day in the Northern climates.

If it gets to 45 degrees, they are wearing three layers of clothing and a parka.

Not much danger of a hard freeze there.


ED
 

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They make toilets that exit horizontally out through a wall - no subflooring required. You can run your vanity drains and supplies outside if you wish also <<--- That's assuming you are not subject to freezing. If you have freezing you can built an insulated box around the exposed pipes and use vent inside to open that new insulated box to the warmth of the rest of the bathroom.
Forgot about those. Fine if the toilet is right against the outside wall; otherwise, drainage slope is still required.
 
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The bathroom will be on a raised floor. Out here, most people do things themselves, as it is extremely rural....cattle outnumber humans at least 100 to 1.
I did take the time to get an actual state approved septic system, but most do that themselves, as with electrical, plumbing, etc...
I personally have not heard of a county building inspector ever being out here.
The ranch is private property with a private road from the highway, with the ranch house sitting over 8 miles back.
Basically, I'm just curious if plumbing can be ran out the side of a residential building, and still be within average building codes, as I'm sure codes run different from state to state?
Thanks for the help
Septic sizing is usually determined by the quantity of bedrooms. You might want to check with your local health department and see if they inspect. We do in Ohio. Not sure about Texas but in Ohio residential does not have an agricultural exemption from inspections.
Draw what you desire to do I'll try to help
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I think Neals point was if there was a proximity issue between the well and septic bed; there are rules (or at least guidelines) to prevent well contaminations. If it is a surface or dug well, it is something I would be concerned about if it is too close. It sounds like there is no meaningful code enforcement out your way. I can't see any difference with waste lines going out the side of a building vs. underground, but I'll leave it to the pros here to fill in the technical points about required slope, etc.
So this is correct, with the first septic system, the septic tank and drain field must be at least 100' from the perimeter of any dry creek, or 100' from a well. Where my building will be, is over 200' from the closest draw, and a little over 1/2 mile from my closest well.
Thanks for the help
 
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