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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. Great forum. Thanks to all those who give so unselfishly o help people like me. So here’s my problem. I have a Hampton Bay ceiling fan with light that has a switch that can control a dimming light and 3 fan speeds. What I want to do is move the fan and change it to an oscillating fan (with no light) AND also install a light around where the fan used to be. And I’d like to do all of this while still using the original switch. Any ideas? Thanks. Pics below.
 

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Do you want to use the original switch to control both the new fan and the new light? Are you prepared to open up the walls and ceiling?
 

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How far are you moving the fan? You will need to run a cable from the existing fan location to the new fan location. Tie that in to the fan power in the old box.
then put up your light on the existing box.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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You switch is a remote control that connects to the receiver in the fan canopy. Run a 2 wire cable from the existing fan mounting box to a new box for the light. At the receiver connect the new fan to the receiver fan wire, connect the black of the new 2 wire cable to the receiver fan wire, connect the white to the circuit neutral.
 

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This is true IF the fan has a separate control box mounted inside the fan mounting bracket. Some fans have the controler built into the fan itself.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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This is true IF the fan has a separate control box mounted inside the fan mounting bracket. Some fans have the controler built into the fan itself.
I have that exact same Hampton Bay controller on my guest bedroom fan, it has a separate receiver in the canopy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Do you want to use the original switch to control both the new fan and the new light? Are you prepared to open up the walls and ceiling?
Hi. Thanks for getting back to me. Yes I’m willing to go into the ceiling but my hope is that if I use the original switch and somehow separate the fan and light wiring at the ceiling receptacle that I can just install a ceiling light and move the fan. Is that clear? lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi. Thanks for getting back to me. Yes I’m willing to go into the ceiling but my hope is that if I use the original switch and somehow separate the fan and light wiring at the ceiling receptacle that I can just install a ceiling light and move the fan. Is that clear? lol
And yes I was hoping to use the existing switch.
How far are you moving the fan? You will need to run a cable from the existing fan location to the new fan location. Tie that in to the fan power in the old box.
then put up your light on the existing box.
I get that kind of but I was just hoping I could somehow just extend the fan location and the light location away from each other. In my brain it seems doable
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You switch is a remote control that connects to the receiver in the fan canopy. Run a 2 wire cable from the existing fan mounting box to a new box for the light. At the receiver connect the new fan to the receiver fan wire, connect the black of the new 2 wire cable to the receiver fan wire, connect the white to the circuit neutral.
This sounds encouraging. So if ur saying the fan is NOT hardwired to the switch? Does this mean the fan is getting power from some other source?
 

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You may be able to use existing wiring for the new light at the old fan location, but I don't see how you plan to relocate the fan w/out new wiring, unless you by some stroke of luck have wires there already.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You may be able to use existing wiring for the new light at the old fan location, but I don't see how you plan to relocate the fan w/out new wiring, unless you by some stroke of luck have wires there already.
Yes I would run new wiring from the ceiling box only. The question is (and maybe I should take a picture of what is there in the ceiling) can I just attach wire to something and move the fan AND attach wires to something else and move the light component while continuing to use the original Hampton bay wall switch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes I would run new wiring from the ceiling box only. The question is (and maybe I should take a picture of what is there in the ceiling) can I just attach wire to something and move the fan AND attach wires to something else and move the light component while continuing to use the original Hampton bay wall switch.
Inside ceiling receptacle
 

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It looks to me like the power for the fan and light comes into the box in the wall with the switch, and only a switch loop runs to the fan. If this is the case, you cannot use the wall switch to control the light independent of the fan, unless you run an additional cable from the wall box, or elsewhere, to the fan, to supply unswitched power to it.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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The fan and the light work independently before you touch anything. It goes not matter if the power is wired to the switch or to the fan box. Follow what I said in post #7, all you are doing is extending the light kit to a different location.

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I think you can do what you want to do with some messy wiring changes, the question is should you or do you really want to?

At the current ceiling hexagon box you have a hot and a neutral coming from the wall switch. That is connected to the fan receiver inside the fan canopy. That receiver is a "hub" to control your fan and light separately. Presently you have the hot conductor from the house connected to both the fan and light conductors on the receiver. That receiver should also work with a remote instead of a wall switch.

If you want to move the fan to a new location say five feet over. You need to install a new fan rated ceiling box and secure it to the framing. You could run a new 12-3 or 14-3 wire from the old box to the new box. Use the black and white conductor of the wire to extend the existing wiring from the wall switch to the new box location. Then install your fan including the receiver. On the receiver, there is a blue conductor to go to the light and a black to go to the fan. Separate the blue from the fan wiring to disable the integrated light kit. If you then connect the blue conductor from the receiver to the extra conductor (red) coming from the original ceiling box, then the receiver will now also control the fixture connected to the red conductor at the original ceiling box. So at the original box you have a red and white you can connect that to a new light fixture.

It should work, but this may not be to code, and confusing to the person who comes behind you to trouble shoot wiring.

The proper way is to have a 12-3 or 14-3 from the wall switch up to the box to allow you to wire it however you want with or without a receiver. Heck you may already have a 3 wire with one conductor capped off you never know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I think you can do what you want to do with some messy wiring changes, the question is should you or do you really want to?

At the current ceiling hexagon box you have a hot and a neutral coming from the wall switch. That is connected to the fan receiver inside the fan canopy. That receiver is a "hub" to control your fan and light separately. Presently you have the hot conductor from the house connected to both the fan and light conductors on the receiver. That receiver should also work with a remote instead of a wall switch.

If you want to move the fan to a new location say five feet over. You need to install a new fan rated ceiling box and secure it to the framing. You could run a new 12-3 or 14-3 wire from the old box to the new box. Use the black and white conductor of the wire to extend the existing wiring from the wall switch to the new box location. Then install your fan including the receiver. On the receiver, there is a blue conductor to go to the light and a black to go to the fan. Separate the blue from the fan wiring to disable the integrated light kit. If you then connect the blue conductor from the receiver to the extra conductor (red) coming from the original ceiling box, then the receiver will now also control the fixture connected to the red conductor at the original ceiling box. So at the original box you have a red and white you can connect that to a new light fixture.

It should work, but this may not be to code, and confusing to the person who comes behind you to trouble shoot wiring.

The proper way is to have a 12-3 or 14-3 from the wall switch up to the box to allow you to wire it however you want with or without a receiver. Heck you may already have a 3 wire with one conductor capped off you never know.
Thanks so much. Totally understand! I’m not overly fussed about the blue and the junction box I will leave capped in the ceiling for access. I will draw it all out and be sure I understand before proceeding. Only thing I’m unsure about is the blue. Will review more in-depth. Again thank you and thanks to everyone who offered help! Paul
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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I did screw up one thing, he wants to move the fan and leave the light where it is. Run a 3 wire cable to the new box for the fan. Use the white as neutral, black as the hot, red as a switch leg back to the new light. The black and white get wired to the receiver input. The fan out put goes to the black of the fan, the light output gets wired to the red switch leg back to the new light.

Sent from my moto g power using Tapatalk
 
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