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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a copeland semi hermetic compressor out of a reach in freezer. model number is kamb 007e caa 800. when I plug in the freezer, the compressor tries to start, but after 4-5 seconds, the circut breaker tripps. I ohmed out the windings and I have resistance, and none of the wingings are grounded out. I checked the windings on the condenser fan, and they are good. I noticed there was no refrigerant in the freezer at all, would that cause the breaker to trip? a few technicians diagnosed it as a compressor burnout, and I want to confirm that before I have it re built.
 

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I'm Your Huckleberry
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Rebuilt? Replaced.

Any time a componet struggles to operate it draws more amps and thus draws more heat so if you are low on refrigerant then yes, it very well could cause the breaker to trip and most likely did.

You can stick a hard start kit on it and see if it starts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I checked and both capacitors are good. I found the leak, it was on a corroded piece of the suction line. I just dont know if the compressor needs to be rebuilt or not...
 

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Hard to say if the compressor needs rebuilt or not fromhere. But, running a compressor with no charge in the system can burn them out.
 

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Rebuilt? Replaced.

Any time a componet struggles to operate it draws more amps and thus draws more heat so if you are low on refrigerant then yes, it very well could cause the breaker to trip and most likely did.

You can stick a hard start kit on it and see if it starts.
Semi Hermetics are rebuilt all the time, once a compressor sticks it will stick again some day, guaranteed.
 

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Recheck your Ohms again because from what you said it is either stuck or grounded if the breaker trips that fast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
COLDIRON said:
Recheck your Ohms again because from what you said it is either stuck or grounded if the breaker trips that fast.
do I need to scratch off the black paint on the compressor in order to make contact to properly check if the compressor is grounded? I know on a hermetic I dont have to...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
beenthere said:
Hard to say if the compressor needs rebuilt or not fromhere. But, running a compressor with no charge in the system can burn them out.
if you were looking at this unit, what would you look for to determine if you need to rebuild it?
 

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I'm Your Huckleberry
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if you were looking at this unit, what would you look for to determine if you need to rebuild it?
If it started would be good. I'd change to a new capacitor and add a NEW hard start kit IF there was not continuity to ground meaning the compressor was not grounded and if testing one terminal to the other from all three showed continuity meaning the windings are still good.

IF you have continuity, tested in OHMS, to ground from any one terminal (c s r) to the next than it is bad. If you do not show continuinity, tested in OHMS, between each of the three terminals, c to s, s to r and r to c (common, start, run) but rather read OL between any or all of those than it is bad and needs rebuilt as the windings are burnt and broken, open. No electricity can flow through open windings.
 

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do I need to scratch off the black paint on the compressor in order to make contact to properly check if the compressor is grounded? I know on a hermetic I dont have to...

Should be able to find an exposed copper line to check to.
 

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I'd check to see if the windings resistance adds up, then probably pull the head, and see if i can move the piston/pistons(after recovering the charge first of course).
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
oh, ok. I understand about the windings, but I forgot that the two smaller resistances are supposed to add up to the highest one. I simply checked that there was resistance period. I was not taught about semi hermetics so I didnt know I could open it without causing damage. another question I have is what causes acidic refrigerant after a burnout?
 

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The burn out causes the acid.

Make sure you get new gaskets before pulling the head off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
beenthere said:
The burn out causes the acid.

Make sure you get new gaskets before pulling the head off.
ok. well I sent it to get rebuilt. I dont think I fully understand what happens inside the compressor when a burnout occurs... I thought that it was an electrical short, and if thats true, I would like to learn the physics of how the acid appears...
 

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Generally, the arc/spark of the windings causes the acid to be produced from the oil and refrigerant.
 

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ok. well I sent it to get rebuilt. I dont think I fully understand what happens inside the compressor when a burnout occurs... I thought that it was an electrical short, and if thats true, I would like to learn the physics of how the acid appears...
http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Ways-...r-Can-Fail,-and-What-To-Do-About-It&id=635179

"Also, usually the short will blow some sparks - which produces acid inside the air conditioner system by decomposing the freon into a mixture of hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acid."

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/635179
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
ok sweet. I sorta figured the short would cause a chemical reaction... I like to understand the reason things happen... one final question... how do I determin what viscosity of oil I need to put in the compresor?
 

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http://www.emersonclimate.com/en-us/resources/faq/pages/copeland_compressor.aspx#Q8

How can I determine the type and quantity of oil in a compressor? ANSWER: This information can be found on the compressor nameplate. The oil type will be abbreviated, for example MIN, meaning mineral oil or POE, meaning polyol ester oil. The oil amount is the number found beneath the oil type and is a unit measure of fluid ounces (US). So if it says 265, which means 265 fluid ounces.

http://www.substech.com/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=compressor_oils
 
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