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Self-leveler on Amdry Thermoquiet gone wrong

605 Views 7 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  StephDB
Looking for some advice...

We've done self leveler before. We've done in floor heating before. We've done LVP before. Never all together in a basement though.

We're currently renovating a basement apartment and decided to go with in floor heating as a primary heat source. Big regrets.

We bought Amdry Thermoquiet to decouple from the concrete floor and fastened it down with carpet tape. We then attached the in floor heating coil with the tracks and hot glue. All good. We sealed all the edges and boundaries we needed to and went on to pour self leveler. It went down smooth and the house smelled like concrete. All good. We went down the next day to find hollow spots where the concrete separated from the underlayment and as soon as these sections were stepped on, they cracked and crumbled.

We now have high and low spots with cable buried in the majority of the self leveler. We're debating pulling up the entire thing and scrapping it or trying to patch the areas that were bad. Any advice? We've sunk over $1500 in it already.

651996
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Contact the manufacturer(s) they may have suggestions for what went wrong and how to correct.
Thanks. I called both Mapei and Amvic (for the Thermoquiet) and they're both pointing the finger at each other with no actual suggestions or solutions. Cause the issue is literally between the two products in not sure who to pursue. Amvic says they've never heard of issues with Mapei and Mapei says they've never heard of air pockets like this.
 

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Full disclosure I know nothing about the topic but would be looking for similarities between all the failed points...

1. Has anything lifted up or moved under the trouble areas
2. from memory were the trouble areas done later in the process? I.e. I see a doorway, was this towards the end of a pour when maybe the material was starting to harden so it skimmed over but didn't flow to fill underneath?
3. were these "joint" areas between different batches? Maybe the two layers didn't marry well...maybe similar effect to #2

Anyways just some ideas. If manufacturers aren't being helpful I think all you can do is open up some of the pockets and remember your process to try to identify the link between the trouble spots...

Hope this helps

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If I’m interpreting what you’ve written correctly, it seems that you adhered a rubberized underlayment to the concrete floor with 2-sided tape, but presumably you didn’t do that over the entire surface, so there would have been places where the natural curve of the product and low spots in the concrete would have kept it from being in contact with the floor. If a significant weight of topping had been applied to that it would have pressed the underlayment down in contact and there wouldn’t have been any issue, but the thin layer of self-leveling compound wasn’t heavy enough to do that. The compound dried with the underlayment not in contact with the concrete, so then breaks when you step on it.

The installation instructions for Thermoquiet read:

Securement to concrete surfaces can be done with the following methods:
• Secured with carpet double sided tape every 4’ (1219mm).
• Fully adhered with standard (foam approved) general purpose urethane fl oor adhesive (once enƟ re fl oor is covered, allow three hours to cure before continuing with finished floor installation). Adhesive is applied with a roller or a brush.
The first method would have been suitable if a finished flooring was being installed directly on top of it. For your situation, I’m afraid that you should have chosen the second method.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If I’m interpreting what you’ve written correctly, it seems that you adhered a rubberized underlayment to the concrete floor with 2-sided tape, but presumably you didn’t do that over the entire surface, so there would have been places where the natural curve of the product (which comes in a roll) would have kept it from being in contact with the floor. If a significant weight of topping had been applied to that it would have pressed the underlayment down in contact and there wouldn’t have been any issue, but the thin layer of self-leveling compound wasn’t heavy enough to do that. The compound dried with the underlayment not in contact with the concrete, so then breaks when you step on it.

The installation instructions for Thermoquiet read:



The first method would have been suitable if a finished flooring was being installed directly on top of it. For your situation, I’m afraid that you should have chosen the second method.

Chris
Thanks Chris. We pulled the underlayment pretty tight and it's actually still level with the floor and still stuck down even after removing the crumbled pieces so unless it swelled and stretched and then returned to level I'm not sure this was the case. It seems the air or gas was between the self leveler and the underlayment.
 
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