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Discussion Starter #1
Many of the electrical receptacle boxes in my house are loose. It's 60 years old, so not entirely surprised. All the boxes I've encountered thus far have been mounted to the face of the stud (between drywall and stud).

Is there a way to secure these boxes without ripping out any drywall? Some are so loose it's difficult to mount a receptacle in there. I would even be open to removing them and replacing with new boxes, but given how they are mounted I don't see how that's possible without pulling the drywall.

Any tips on this?
 

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Many of the electrical receptacle boxes in my house are loose. It's 60 years old, so not entirely surprised. All the boxes I've encountered thus far have been mounted to the face of the stud (between drywall and stud).

Is there a way to secure these boxes without ripping out any drywall? Some are so loose it's difficult to mount a receptacle in there. I would even be open to removing them and replacing with new boxes, but given how they are mounted I don't see how that's possible without pulling the drywall.

Any tips on this?
To confirm your gang box looks like this either PVC (as shown) or Metal?

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Carlon-1-Gang-18-cu-in-Blue-PVC-New-Work-Electrical-Switch-and-Outlet-Box-with-Bracket-B118B-UPC/100404148?modalType=drawer

If so you can kill power first, unscrew the receptacle and bend it up out of the way if possible or remove if needed and make note of wire locations if not using standard colors and drive a screw into the side of the box so that it goes into the width of the stud. Can't hurt to put a piece of electrical tap over any exposed screws you put in to prevent any arch/fault. If the box's are metal I suggest you pilot holes first to make life easier.


Cheers!

TRI0N :vs_cool:
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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To confirm your gang box looks like this either PVC (as shown) or Metal?

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Carlon-1-Gang-18-cu-in-Blue-PVC-New-Work-Electrical-Switch-and-Outlet-Box-with-Bracket-B118B-UPC/100404148?modalType=drawer

If so you can kill power first, unscrew the receptacle and bend it up out of the way if possible or remove if needed and make note of wire locations if not using standard colors and drive a screw into the side of the box so that it goes into the width of the stud. Can't hurt to put a piece of electrical tap over any exposed screws you put in to prevent any arch/fault. If the box's are metal I suggest you pilot holes first to make life easier.


Cheers!

TRI0N :vs_cool:
I have done that with plastic and metal boxes. BTW it is technically a code violation. I use pan head screws to minimize a sharp edge the could damage the conductor insulation.

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Discussion Starter #5
They are metal boxes.

I can try to run a screw or two through them, but not sure how easy that will be drilling on an angle.
 

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I've shot foam insulation out the back of the box from an aerosol using the extension nozzle so none if it gets inside the box. It'll swell up and support the box very well if you spend the time to shoot it in incrementally until you build up just the right amount. Works great. Not code approved ul listed support however.
 

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If the box is held between the stud and the drywall, why not drill a hole on the face, through the drywall, through the box tab that's between the stud and drywall, then put a screw?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If the box is held between the stud and the drywall, why not drill a hole on the face, through the drywall, through the box tab that's between the stud and drywall, then put a screw?
That's not a bad idea... I'd have to make sure I don't hit the existing nail or two but assuming it's all 1 piece that could firm it up a bit.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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If the box is held between the stud and the drywall, why not drill a hole on the face, through the drywall, through the box tab that's between the stud and drywall, then put a screw?
Not all those old metal boxes have those mounting ears. Many have 2 nails that go thru the box itself.

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