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We just put in some raised flower beds w treated lumber and I'm wondering if there is something I can coat the inside of the beds with before I put in the soil, that will help them last even longer? My husband suggested that rubberized paint like a truck bed liner. Besides being expensive, is there a reason this product will not work? I'm worried that it may not adhere to treated wood, or could peel ect.
 

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retired framer
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We just put in some raised flower beds w treated lumber and I'm wondering if there is something I can coat the inside of the beds with before I put in the soil, that will help them last even longer? My husband suggested that rubberized paint like a truck bed liner. Besides being expensive, is there a reason this product will not work? I'm worried that it may not adhere to treated wood, or could peel ect.

We just stapled 6 mill poly to the inside of the walls. That keeps the dirt out of the timbers and the treatment out of the dirt.
 

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You could do that if you like. I wouldn't. Reason being it's ground contact pressure treated wood.

it's going to last at least 10 years or so anyway even if you do nothing at all to it. Replaced mine at the 15 year mark. They were still good and not rotted just water logged. Just my opinion.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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The poly is good, or find an old conveyor belt.

Cut some panels from it, and screw it to the inside. SS screws will last longer in the PT, and soil inside the planter.

Lots of alternatives to use as a liner, water feature liner, rubber backed carpeting, a ruptured water bed mattress, rain coat, and the list goes on.


ED
 

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I would cover the insides, if nothing else, because of the leaching chemicals into the plants, if there are for food.

I built some beds years back and I did cover the insides, wrapping over on top and bottom a bit with two layers, first black stapled poly, and then nailed, with 1" wide head roofing nails, some heavy landscape cloth to avoid tearing the plastic when cultivating. The kind of cloth that looks like grey fibers. I think is called "filter cloth", almost looks like fiberglass, but is some kind of plastic fibers. I gave the beds away through craiglist last year, when we decided to drop the veggie garden.

A friend that sold his house a year ago, had built a substantial raised garden, with 16-20 beds 12' long, and he just went for simple black poly lining. The plastic was breaking away over time.
 

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Naildriver
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One of my clients got a rather good deal on Trex (or compatible) decking. Made her raised beds of it and it should last longer than she will.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That is a composite type lumber? I thought of that but didn't know if they might bow under the pressure of soil bulging out at the sides? I did price some and it as so expensive :(

I was thinking about using this , supposed to have a UV additive. We would be putting a board over the top to cover it, like a frame/rim so it wouldn't get too much sun on it anyway I wouldn't think. Maybe it won't work? https://www.menards.com/main/paint/...v-additive/5680095/p-1444451030463-c-8188.htm
 

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do you have a link to something similar like you used in yours?

I have not found a link for the one I used. When I lived in the HD area, they used to carry it, light color grey, looks like fiber glass strands pressed glued, but is some platic fiber. In this area, some box stores carry it but in very contractor rolls. On the other hand, a nursery business near home has all fabrics by the foot...


Since the mission of my second layer was to protect the poly, if you want, you can use the other type of black woven poly strands, which is rather common and can be found in smaller rolls. It is a pain because the edges keep been undone when cut if just plain cut. What I would do is cut it roughly along the thread lines, roll it over the edge of the bed. Nail a 1x2 white wood strip over it and then if you have a propane torch on hand, run it along the exterior of the bed to cut/weld the fibers. (I learned the torch trick to cut this fabric from a landscaper). If not, just use a utility knife, but then may be I would fold the fabric a bit under the wood strip before nailing it.
 
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