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Schlage Lockset - emergency exit

I just bought 2 schlage "emergency exit" locksets by accident. I was at Home Depot with DH and we saw at the very top a handleset/deadbolt combo pack for $29.99 marked with "Special Order Inventory". These were $29.99 and the visually similar ones on the shelf were $49.99. We installed this on our brand new service door on our garage. We were pleasantly surprised at this behavior because we often forget to lock doors and this will ensure our service door is locked. If we get locked out we have a keypad on the garage. I can't help but think the other ones at HD for $49.99 behave as most people expect (rigid handle when locked).

However the 2nd was planned to be installed from our house to our garage and I won't put it on the house because we rely on this door being unlocked. It brought back the memory of the time we were locked in the garage and I don't want that to happen to me at home because I know it will.

I'm going to try previous posters fix for the handleset and I went and purchased the 2 screws today (splurged 16 cents at ACE to get them).
 

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Bill Kearney
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Excellent warning about those locks. I'll definitely keep that in mind when we build the new house.

I installed a Schlage electric keypad handle just for the lock-out reason. I got tired of taking out the trash only to discover I'd locked myself out. Now I just punch the code and I'm back inside. Yeah, there's the potential security issue of the code. But the door's in a glass-walled sunroom, so if someone wants to get in there are much easier ways that hacking the keypad.
 

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Do you know what set you purchased?
It was a Kwikset lever-handle lockset with seperate deadbolt. I double-checked and it does have a rigid interior handle when locked. I'm pretty sure I got it at Lowe's, but if I didn't then it would have been Home Depot (they are right across the street from one another in my town, so it's hard to remember whether I wanted to look at orange or blue that day)
 

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i have that type lockset. i am getting used to it. but i did lock myself out one time, and so did my wife. i keep a hidden key in the garage.
 

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Thank you!

I bought a two sets of Yale locks 10+ years ago where each set had two locking knobs and two deadbolts all keyed the same. Nice convenience that both packages were keyed the same.
I liked the keys with the larger handle and when the knob was locked, it wouldn't turn.
In total I spend $60 for 4 hand locks and 4 deadbolts and 16 keys, not the highest quality, but I liked them.

When I replaced all doors in the house, I went with the Schlage Nickle and the first day I locked myself in the garage twice. lol

Tough getting use to the fact where the knob still turns when locked.
Funny because when I was picking up the extra Schlage set, I was debating just getting a deadbolt and a regular knob without a lock. I could return just that one, but I already had them re-key it.


Some Schlage door locks have an "Emergency Exit Feature" that allows the inside door knob to open the door, even when it is locked. This is suppose to allow for a faster exit because you don't have to unlock the door first. However, I find that I am more likely to lock myself out of the house because I can open the door with it still locked, then be caught outside a locked door without any keys.

When the door is unlocked, the inner square tube does not spin freely, allowing either knob to open the door.
When the door is locked, the inner square tube spins freely, allowing the inside knob to still open the door.
The key is to prevent the inner square tube from spinning freely at all.
This will prevent either knob from working unless the door is unlocked.

How to disable the Emergency Exit Feature of Schlage door locks:
Remove the outer knob from the door, then add 2 screws to it as follows:
Drill two 7/64" holes in opposite sides of the plate beside the square tube.
Drill just deep enough to go through the plate and internal ring attached to the square tube, but stop once you make contact with the inner lock mechanism.
Drill the holes with the knob unlocked, so the square tube is properly aligned in the non-free-spinning mode.
Insert two #6 x 3/8" machine screws into the plate and internal ring attached to the square tube, but not so far as to make contact with the inner lock mechanism.
Verify that the locking shaft turns freely before replacing the outer knob on the door.

Notes:
Shorter screws may be better, but I couldn't find any. Only about 1/2 of the threads are used, and I had plenty of clearance in the door with the other half of the screws still sticking out.
Don't use pointy or self-drilling screws, as the point will make contact with the inner lock mechanism before the threads grab.
I found that a 7/64" hole size to be just big enough to be self tapped with the #6 machine screw and remain tight.
The screw heads may touch the square tube, but the screw threads in the internal ring prevent it from spinning.
You could also try to weld, solder or use JB-Weld to secure the square tube in place, I didn't try these.
This may apply to other brands of locks, I don't know.
:thumbsup:
 

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I hope you don't mind, but I took your idea and improved it for myself.
The problem I had with your fix is the knob would sometime turn enough to open, probably because I didn't do it perfect and not necessarily a problem with your method.

So here's what I did:
I drilled the two 7/64" holes as you instructed.

I then took 6-32 machine screws and screwed them in the holes I just drilled so it would be easier to screw them back in after I shortened them.

I then screwed the proper size nut for a 6-32 screw all the way down to the bottom until it hit the screw head.

Next I took my wire stripper/bolt cutter and screwed it all the way down until it bottom out to the nut and cut it. This left about 3/16 of threads, more or less.

I then unscrewed the nut until there was just a few threads left before it falling off.

Next, I screwed it back in the previously drilled and tapped holes in the lock about 2-3 turns which caused it to bottom out on the nut and lock the bolt in place from loosening.

I did this on both sides.
The flat side of the nut locked the center square post in place and it worked perfectly!

Thanks for the idea and I hope this helps other people out as well.
Below is a pic of what I ended up with.




Some Schlage door locks have an "Emergency Exit Feature" that allows the inside door knob to open the door, even when it is locked. This is suppose to allow for a faster exit because you don't have to unlock the door first. However, I find that I am more likely to lock myself out of the house because I can open the door with it still locked, then be caught outside a locked door without any keys.

When the door is unlocked, the inner square tube does not spin freely, allowing either knob to open the door.
When the door is locked, the inner square tube spins freely, allowing the inside knob to still open the door.
The key is to prevent the inner square tube from spinning freely at all.
This will prevent either knob from working unless the door is unlocked.

How to disable the Emergency Exit Feature of Schlage door locks:
Remove the outer knob from the door, then add 2 screws to it as follows:
Drill two 7/64" holes in opposite sides of the plate beside the square tube.
Drill just deep enough to go through the plate and internal ring attached to the square tube, but stop once you make contact with the inner lock mechanism.
Drill the holes with the knob unlocked, so the square tube is properly aligned in the non-free-spinning mode.
Insert two #6 x 3/8" machine screws into the plate and internal ring attached to the square tube, but not so far as to make contact with the inner lock mechanism.
Verify that the locking shaft turns freely before replacing the outer knob on the door.

Notes:
Shorter screws may be better, but I couldn't find any. Only about 1/2 of the threads are used, and I had plenty of clearance in the door with the other half of the screws still sticking out.
Don't use pointy or self-drilling screws, as the point will make contact with the inner lock mechanism before the threads grab.
I found that a 7/64" hole size to be just big enough to be self tapped with the #6 machine screw and remain tight.
The screw heads may touch the square tube, but the screw threads in the internal ring prevent it from spinning.
You could also try to weld, solder or use JB-Weld to secure the square tube in place, I didn't try these.
This may apply to other brands of locks, I don't know.
:thumbsup:
 

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That is exactly what I did a few decades ago, and it has proved helpful well for us; actually, it has exercised even better than I believed that it might. They have the urgent start from the within when secure function but they instantly start up the handle when getting out of from the within.
 

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Marvelous, marvelous!

I'm glad you got it to work. It's nice to see someone else using our idea.
Maybe this will promote the manufacturers to include a removable pin to select if you want the emergency exit feature or not!
Or better yet, make the outside knob unlock when exiting!
:thumbup:

I hope you don't mind, but I took your idea and improved it for myself.
The problem I had with your fix is the knob would sometime turn enough to open, probably because I didn't do it perfect and not necessarily a problem with your method.

So here's what I did:
I drilled the two 7/64" holes as you instructed.

I then took 6-32 machine screws and screwed them in the holes I just drilled so it would be easier to screw them back in after I shortened them.

I then screwed the proper size nut for a 6-32 screw all the way down to the bottom until it hit the screw head.

Next I took my wire stripper/bolt cutter and screwed it all the way down until it bottom out to the nut and cut it. This left about 3/16 of threads, more or less.

I then unscrewed the nut until there was just a few threads left before it falling off.

Next, I screwed it back in the previously drilled and tapped holes in the lock about 2-3 turns which caused it to bottom out on the nut and lock the bolt in place from loosening.

I did this on both sides.
The flat side of the nut locked the center square post in place and it worked perfectly!

Thanks for the idea and I hope this helps other people out as well.
Below is a pic of what I ended up with.

 

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Bill Kearney
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During our new house construction it's had the kind of knobs that lacked an emergency exit feature. Don't know if they're Schlage or not. But if you want to go out you've got to turn the lock knob first and then the handle. The upside to these is if you want to check if the door's locked or not all you have to do is try to turn it. If it won't turn, then it's locked. Which is great when you want to check all the doors at the end of the day.

Meanwhile, once the construction's complete we'll be installing all new Schlage keypad locks.
 

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Thank you!

I know this thread is old and I apologize for bringing it back to life, but I wanted to thank TomH and m3rdpwr especially. I've been looking for a fix to this problem for a while and the information that was provided in this thread allowed me to finally FIX this annoyance. I took my fix a little farther and 3D printed a part, getting my daughters involved in the process and making it look pretty. I wrote up an Instructable and posted it under the title: Fix Schlage free egress locksets

I guess I can't post links on my first post, fair enough.

For the record, I included a link to this thread.

Thanks again.
Glen
 

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I believe it is a safety thing, same reason dead bolts don't have keyed locks on the side anymore, in case of fire they don't want you fumbling with a lock to get out.
Not true. They're readily available at all the big box stores, unless your state has outlawed them.

I use them for doors that offer little or no security...meaning that a glass pane can easily be broken allowing the intruder to easily reach through and unlock the door.

See the link below...dual cylinder deadbolts...cylinders on both sides.

http://www.lowes.com/pd_133371-352-B62N+V+716_0__?productId=3449716&Ntt=keyed+deadbolts&pl=1&currentURL=?Ntt=keyed+deadbolts&facetInfo=
 
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