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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,


Our contractor was fired for not listening to us because the lippage on floor tiles are so bad. When natural lights are hitting the floor, we can see them all over the place. Unfortunately, this was done a few years ago and it was too late to remove the tiles since the cabinets were installed right after.


We actually tried to clean up the sub floor by scraping the adhesive off before the tile installation but we had thought contractors would prep the sub floor before installing the tiles.


I'm trying to figure out how to flatten the sharp edges since the little one is now running around so much and the porcelain tiles with straight edges are really painful. I would be nice to be able to slide the chairs backwards without their legs hitting the lippage and tip over.
 

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R and R is obviously the correct answer... but you know that.....

It would be a he11 of a job.... but the only possible solution I could think of would be to use a grinder to put a 45 degree on the real bad lippages. (And you would have to test that in a inconspicuous place, as sometimes it might just chip)

Of course, depending on your tile color, it's gonna show bad.
 

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A grinder is way too powerful and will most likely chip the tile making it worse than before.


There is a mesh sanding pad made for smoothing the tile edges that might work with a lot of hand work. I can't recall where I bought it.



There is also these Dremel wheels: https://www.harborfreight.com/large-diamond-rotary-grinding-wheel-set-4-pc-69658.html I wasn't terribly impressed with their speed of grinding but they did do it slowly.
 
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The fix is not tile replacement but grout replacement. If you remove and regrout the tile, you can bring the level of the grout up to the same level as the face of the tile. Hopefully, you don't have the industrial 1/2" grout lines. You'll need to hire someone that has a clue to get this right. Removing the grout is the hard part and the costly part. If you are able to remove the grout yourself you can save a bunch of money. Most any of the box stores should be able to show you how to remove the grout. It's not rocket science but does require some patience. Might also ask the contractor about using an acrylic liquid in the grout instead of water. It makes for a much stronger and wearable grout.
 

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... sharp edges...

Sounds like the tiles are rectified (cut). Large tiles??? They need to be set dead level (actually planar). And if they are cheap tiles that are not flat to start with, I can't see how even a pro can magically create a flat surface.


Dremel with grinding stone or oscillating tool with carbide grit blade might remove material. But I would guess you are sure to be chipping the tile/glaze. I would be figuring that you will be touching up the edge of the tile with paint.
 

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I've answered my own question by you stating this was installed a couple of years ago but I will ask anyway. Do you have any excess tile from this install? Is the tile available still?


I would opt if tiles were available to chip out the most offensive tiles and reset with a new one thus reducing lippage. Others are correct, these are rectified tiles that are milled to be perfectly square for a great install.
 

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I have a different solution than has been suggested so far.

A few years ago I saw where a guy was using Diamond Sponges to sand off sharp edges on tiles and countertops.

Takes lots of ELBOW GREASE, water, and of course the Diamond Sponges.

Do a search online for some to see if they are still available.

Safer than any power tool, but might be costly, but what price is a little one's toes?


ED
 

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By "lippage" do you mean the edge of the tile is standing above the grout?

If so - then you need to regrout - don't bother sanding the tiles.

Get a grout saw and dig out the grout being careful to NOT chip the edges of the tiles. You only need to remove about 1/4" or so - it should go pretty easily.

Then pick a good grout color, mix properly (dry, not runny and wet), pack it in, float it, and then clean and clean and clean it.

You could also use some of the newer epoxy grouts that are easily applied and have a an easier clean up and don't stain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
First of all, I really appreciate the great suggestions thus far. I should have started the post with some pictures, which i will do i now. The lippages are above the grout by far. I thought of re-grouting them since reinstalling the tiles from half a box of spare wouldn't work. It would work because one end of the tile can be flat against another tile but the other 3 sides have lippages at different height. I was afraid that re-grouting will make the grout look like it is sticking out too much above the tile that is flat. These rectified tiles (12x24) were from Mid America industrial grade. I am sure that the installer didn't prep the flooring before installing the tiles.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Looks like they did not grout enough, or when wiping away the excess they took too much out.

Get a 4 ' level and check those tiles for consistent height with their next door,

And then you will know if any are too high, but the first pic, sure looks like little or no grout at all.

Maybe a re-grouting will fix the most of it.



ED
 

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Looks like they did not grout enough, or when wiping away the excess they took too much out.

Get a 4 ' level and check those tiles for consistent height with their next door,

And then you will know if any are too high, but the first pic, sure looks like little or no grout at all.

Maybe a re-grouting will fix the most of it.



ED
Agreed - clearly a poor grout job - scrape some out to roughen the surface and regrout - follow the instruction on the box and watch a lot of videos. DO NOT, DO NOT make the grout watery of it will turn to sand! To make final cleanup of the grout haze easier to clean up, you could seal the top surface of the tile using a good sealer and paint brush - don't get the sealer into the grout joint or edges of the tile.

If this was a contractor, call him back to redo the job. If he was licensed and needs persuasion, call the building department/licensing departments. Ask him innocently if he would have time to redo the grout so it's not a danger or if he knew who you should contact in the licensing bureau to find another contractor to finish the job. Say it nicely, they'll get the hint.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks everyone, i will give re-grouting a try. The contractor was long gone since we fired them (years ago). We even had to buy efflorescence grout removal since some areas have too much water.
 

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A grinder is way too powerful and will most likely chip the tile making it worse than before.


There is a mesh sanding pad made for smoothing the tile edges that might work with a lot of hand work. I can't recall where I bought it.

If the grinder is too powerful, then that solution is too weak. Personally, I would try to use a light touch and go with the grinder, although this would be risky for someone with less experience. I personally am less worried about chipping than you guys are, as I've done this sort of thing (on a smaller scale) and never had much of an issue with it. If it is an issue, it can be handled with a smaller tool such as

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Monster...PIPHorizontal2_rr-_-303097126-_-303097124-_-N
 

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Grout height does not look too far off.


You can try building bevel ramps with grout. But I don't think grout was intended to be hit by chairs, feet, etc.

I agree with this. It is very difficult to build up grout and also at the same time wipe it off effectively. I think you'll be pulling your hair out trying to build it up and wipe it off a the same time. IMO replacing the tiles or grinding are the only worthwhile options. High spots are high spots regardless of whether the grout slopes up to meet it or not. Grout can help slightly.
 

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Reading this thread I remembered an unpleasant moment when I had an incident with my shower tile and how hard it was to restore everything as it was in the beginning. I had to turn to a company that restored all kinds of flooring and surfaces because it was exactly what I needed. In addition, they also take care of carpet water damage restoration and I also needed this service, so I was glad that they solved so many things at once and I didn't have to waste time for that, without having as professional results as they have. If you need such services you can turn to the end of tenancy cleaning Stoke Newington with confidence.
 

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I think re-grout would be way easier than taking the edge off the tile. You may want to seal the tiles to avoid grout adhesion. You'll want to mix the grout not too thin, leave it set until the joints firm, wipe off excess grout using the least amount of water possible. Even some sawdust or similar material can aid grout removal while leaving a nice flush surface. Once the joints set firm, remove any grout film still on the tile.
 
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