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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy folks, first home and it's >100 years old so there's some weird stuff. One corner of the house has a massive sag to it so I went into the basement to see a crawlspace under an addition where the sag is. Problem is the one side of it is not supported at all so that would explain it. I have attached a sketch of what it looks like but if pictures are needed just ask and I can get those too.
I want to reduce the sag because it is very noticeable but am not quite sure exactly how to go about it. I was thinking about putting two jack posts on pavers and a metal plate on top and cranking it up something like 1/4" every month. Good idea or not?
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ok. how much is it sagged and how much $ are you willing to put at this ?

also. start clearing out that area and looking for large pieces of cardboard, and/or plywood. while you planning this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ok. how much is it sagged and how much $ are you willing to put at this ?

also. start clearing out that area and looking for large pieces of cardboard, and/or plywood. while you planning this.
Its significant, several inches and I don't really want to spend a lot of money because its a really old house so I don't see much point.
 

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Split the difference, 1/8" every two weeks.
 

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ok. what is " a lot" ? do you have, or can borrow, any bottle and/or screw jacks ? other resources like wood, saws, etc ? what is your experience with doing any kind of construction ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
ok. what is " a lot" ? do you have, or can borrow, any bottle and/or screw jacks ? other resources like wood, saws, etc ? what is your experience with doing any kind of construction ?
I'm an electrician so I have construction experience but I'm not a carpenter and lifting a house is a bit out of my wheelhouse.
 

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Like Steve mentioned, with old homes you need to jack up very slowly. That being said it looks like there more going on there than just some posts settling. Those three 6x6's indicated someone tried to "fix" the problem before.
 

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So otherwise the plan is ready to go?
Well the 1/8" is to let the really old dried home construction to adapt slowly otherwise you risk a beam/support etc etc from cracking breaking, as well as other twisting of the house. It's settled over 100 yrs, too quick of a lift it won't like.

As far as the rest of the construction you seem to want to do it on a limited budget, and have really not given any info as to the home size/construction etc.
From what you have posted, it seems it's a small area, as you only list two jacks, I'm assuming they are close together.
So the sunken area is small?

For more details on if what you are doing is correct, the Pro's here ( I am not one) need more info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well the 1/8" is to let the really old dried home construction to adapt slowly otherwise you risk a beam/support etc etc from cracking breaking, as well as other twisting of the house. It's settled over 100 yrs, too quick of a lift it won't like.

As far as the rest of the construction you seem to want to do it on a limited budget, and have really not given any info as to the home size/construction etc.
From what you have posted, it seems it's a small area, as you only list two jacks, I'm assuming they are close together.
So the sunken area is small?

For more details on if what you are doing is correct, the Pro's here ( I am not one) need more info.
Home is 1000 square feet with stone foundation. The addition I'm talking about is a crawlspace with a stone foundation. Size of the crawlspace/space above it is approximately 10 x 17. The posts were added after it seems to help with sagging and the supported parts do not sag, it is only the unsupported side that sags leaving me to wonder why they only did 2/3 of the room. I don't mind spending a bit of money but excavating the exterior around the crawlspace is of course a very costly endeavour which given the age of the house is not worth it in my opinion.
 

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I'm an electrician so I have construction experience but I'm not a carpenter and lifting a house is a bit out of my wheelhouse.
excellent, you got this, and a few bucks to put towards it. . btw, i just finished jacking up the middle of my house, the spine beam, the fix the posts and put better footings. so i know about the wheelhouse thing.

jacking the sides should be real easy, you have something to jack on. that back wall, you need to see what there is to jack on = pics of that area.

do you know if its balloon construction ? and if the rim joists are fastened to the foundation ? probably not, but need to know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
excellent, you got this, and a few bucks to put towards it. . btw, i just finished jacking up the middle of my house, the spine beam, the fix the posts and put better footings. so i know about the wheelhouse thing.

jacking the sides should be real easy, you have something to jack on. that back wall, you need to see what there is to jack on = pics of that area.

do you know if its balloon construction ? and if the rim joists are fastened to the foundation ? probably not, but need to know.
I do not know if it's balloon framing but the house was build around 1900 so probably? I do not know when the addition was added but I don't think it was long after as the second story of the house is supported on it. The rim joists sit on the foundation but I do not think they are fastened. Do these pics help? 1st pic is joists sitting on on a 6x6 on top of foundation. Second is another pic of it. 3rd is under the crawlspace in the addition.
Also I must say I'm still an apprentice so I'm not rolling in dough yet.

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How many posts do you anticipate putting in for support?
I would suggest only jacking each post area to get all areas level first, then proceed with evenly lifting each post keeping the area in question level as it goes up.

That might mean not jacking some posts at all till all are level.
 

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Looking at those new pics, this is out of my depth, I would think the area needs to be lifted off of the foundation.
But I am not a pro at this :rolleyes:
 

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the area you want to lift, is that 2 story ? = larger jacks, bottle jacks and much better jack footings.

its doesn't look balloon or fastened.
 
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