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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought several new Pella 250 vinyl windows, new construction style, for a remodel project on my house. House exterior is painted block, no stucco or siding. I'll be installing these direct set, using Tapcons into the block. Because of Covid-related supply chain problems, it took about two months for these windows to arrive. It turns out that I ordered these windows incorrectly and they contain a 5/8" masonry flange. I need to remove a part of this flange so that I can install these windows. Even ignoring the cost to buy the correct windows without a masonry flange, I can't afford another two months delay on this project while I wait for new windows to arrive.

The shop I bought these from advised cutting off 9/16" of the masonry flange that I don't need. They advised using a multi-tool to cut it but I don't trust myself to cut a straight line (not when it counts). My current plan is to create a jig to position a circular saw track square on the window so that I can cut it with a circular saw. I'm planning to buy a blade like this to use: https://www.amazon.com/Tools-Classic-Circular-087-inch-11840/dp/B0002UKS82. I've included a few pictures which show the part of the flange that I need to remove, from the front and the back.



Do you think this plan, with this blade, will produce a quality cut? I want to avoid chipping, breaking of the material, etc. Does anyone have any other suggestions or advice?

Also, in looking at the pictures, you'll see a vertical seam where the masonry flange attaches to the frame. I thought at first that I could simply pry this away, but this seam is 1/4" to the inside of the frame. If I remove this, I'm not sure what the face of the frame will look like and I'm concerned that I'll have too wide of a space to caulk per Florida building code (max caulk width is 1/4" if I recall correctly). Does anyone know what the frame will look like if I pry this flange away completely?

Any feedback is appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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I really can't quite visualize it...so caveat as to my advice. But, I've cut off many nailing flanges to "buck" mount windows...(function of buying good over stocked windows at a savings)

I suppoze you could use a circulars saw, or a jig saw...or carefully a recip...or a vibrateing. The main issue is use a fine tooth blade....you can always trim more off if you make sure you don't cut too tight.

I don't think you'll have any prpblem.
 

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retired framer
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Table saw? Usually when cutting vinyl you put the blade in backwards so you get no chipping.

One more use for a backwards circ saw blade: Vinyl siding. When cutting vinyl siding with a circular saw, install a fine-toothed blade backwards on the saw for a smoother, cleaner cut, especially in cold weather (when the material is brittle). Make the cut slowly.Jun. 3, 2014
 

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A fine tooth blade such as a plywood blade and I install them backwards. Not a high risk when warm but when cool or cold the vinyl will shatter, not good. A jigsaw with a fine blade like a metal blade also works .

Bud
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Table saw? Usually when cutting vinyl you put the blade in backwards so you get no chipping.

One more use for a backwards circ saw blade: Vinyl siding. When cutting vinyl siding with a circular saw, install a fine-toothed blade backwards on the saw for a smoother, cleaner cut, especially in cold weather (when the material is brittle). Make the cut slowly.Jun. 3, 2014
Nealtw I wish I could use my table saw. I need to trim three windows in this way, but the largest is 53" x 38" and my rip fence wont extend that far. Plus I'd be worried about pushing it through smoothly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Should I stick these out in the sun for a few hours to warm up the vinyl before trying to cut them?
 

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retired framer
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Nealtw I wish I could use my table saw. I need to trim three windows in this way, but the largest is 53" x 38" and my rip fence wont extend that far. Plus I'd be worried about pushing it through smoothly.
You would set the fence for 1 1/2" you are cutting off. You would need a sheet stock under the window for a smooth ride.
 

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retired framer
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All of the "black abrasive" blades I've seen say they're for cutting metal. Is this what you're referring to, or something else?
Can you find a cheap used window you could try a few cuts a figure what would work best for you.
 

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Ideally you would use a guide attachment on your skilsaw. If you need to make a test cut you've got plenty of material there to practice on.
 

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Do these windows also have a nail fin in addtion to the built in channel you are talking of cutting off? Have a side view picture of the window?
 

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I use an air die grinder with a cut off wheel.
 

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How where they meant to be secured in a opening made like that? Have you thought at all about just putting them in against the block and sealing them up.
 

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I would clamp a straight edge and use an oscillating saw. You have a lot of control.
I have used mine for vinyl siding and trim. Albeit those items are thinner, I think you will be happy with the result.
 
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