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Red Seal Electrician
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It'll work for 120/240V and give at least 80A available for the distance.

Somebody more NEC-savvy than me will can chime-in on its appropriateness...
 

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Southwire (By-the-Foot) 2-2-2-4 Gray Stranded AL SER Cable-13102999 - The Home Depot
This would would fit my bracker box and be good for 100 amps right?
No. 90 amps only. You're getting your information from the wrong chart or sources. Look it up for yourself, it's on table 310.15(B)(16) aluminum section 75C column.


1/0 for 3% 100 amp.
Nope. All due respect, you've been misled by wire salesmen.

#1 simple error, you selected 120V, nobody runs [email protected], you run 240V (voltage drop being a reason).

#2 ampacity. Even in the People's Republic of Canada, you only have to calculate based on known actual load, or 80% of the feeder, whatever is less.

#3 target percentage. Canada requires 3%, yes. But in the US we don't require "nanny breakers" like that and we can breaker to actual wire ampacity. E.G. 1/0 wire can take a 125A breaker (since with feeder you round up).

In the US you can run any voltage drop you are comfortable with. The only option I see for an AHJ to intervene is if you're doing something just crazy like running equipment outside its spec.

For instance even your calculation came out to 3.22%. In America we have the freedom to call that good enough, which it really is. I have high hopes that our Canadian buds would see it that way too when it's so close.
 

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Make up your mind lol.

If you're going overhead, you use overhead quadplex such as 2-2-2-2 Palomino (for 90A), but you have to restrain it properly.

If conduit, you can use MH feeder if you enjoy a challenge, but you could also use #2 or #1 XHHW wire. You'll need three regular sized wires for the conductors, then one #6 Al wire for ground.

#2 for 90A
#1 for 100A

The advantage to #2 is it's easier to find in overhead line or MH feeder.
 

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I did a temporary 10-3 wg about 150' till I could get my permanent wires run. Temporally turned into about 10 years, and frankly I was impressed, you could weld with it, & run a 5hp compressor + a 4 post lift, sometimes more than one of those at once. Finally, we had a contractor run a 4-0, and that is overkill, but it is no doubt easier on the equipment.
 

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There is a ice dam in my conduit so I cant push it through untill spring so I want a wire that I can string in the air until spring.
Do you have an idea where the ice damm is? Would it be possible to feed some flex pipe and blow warm air for a few days?
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I just blew air through it and discovered I was mistaken about there being a ice dam and the pipe is clear! I decided to go with 1/0 URD 4 wire to run to my shop. What do I have to do to my box to make it ready for the wire?
Here are some pics of the box in my shop.
Thanks
20210113_130603.jpg
20210113_130634.jpg
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You need to add a ground bar and move the grounds off the enutral bar.

I would also look at replacing the panel with something more current.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Also do I have to have a grounding rod conected to the ground bar on the box in my shop.
 

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FIDO...
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Grounds and neutrals need to be totally separate in a subpanel. In those pics, you just have a neutral bar. You do not currently have a proper ground bar (that I can see anyway).

A ground bar needs to be added (other side of panel or bottom typically), and all grounds will go to it. Neutrals (only) stay on the right-side bar.
 

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FYI : Unless the URD is dual rated it may not be approved for inside a building. There really isn't any reason to use URD in conduit. There are more economical alternatives.
 

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What brand is the panel?

A grounding system would be required at the detached structure.
 

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At least replace the breakers. They belong in a breaker museum, and we're only talking $15 worth of breakers. Nobody cares about the vintage of the main breaker because it's only there to be a switch.

The panel looks new enough to be CTL, so if it's still supportable with new breakers, I'd say keep it. It has lots of spaces and that's always a desirable thing.

You do need to see about a ground bar; start at the panel labeling and see what they specify for ground bar model numbers. With any luck, the successor manufacturer still makes the ground bars that will line up with the pre-drilled holes on the left side of the panel.
 
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