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Hey guys I got a about a 140 foot run to my shed from my main panel. I was thinking of running 60 amps out there, I think that should be sufficient. I'm looking for some recommendations on cable size and type. I was planning on running a pvc conduct underground ( lots of digging). Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
 

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If it were me I'd install a 100amp feeder. Not much cost difference and will provide for future use. You can use 2/2/4/4 aluminum USE or XHHW. in 1.50 schedule 40 pvc. It'll fit in 1.25 but for ease of pull I'd use 1.50.
 

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Yeah, what he said. You can always use a smaller breaker on thicker wire, but you can't use a heavier breaker on thinner wire.

Unless of course you like to burn things down or create catastrophic failures. Or just like having the local fire department over to watch things burn down.
 

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Very Stable Genius
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#6 copper and #4 Al are generally correct sizes for hots for 60A's.
With that distance, going up one size might be required to meet
whatever code your on.
 

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I agree to go 100 amps. #3 cu or #2 al would be adequate especially since you do not actually expect to pull more than 60 amps. I would use THHN instead of a cable. Much easier to pull in a conduit.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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I think automatically recommending 100 amps to feed a shed without knowing the size or planned use is overkill. The size of the feeder should be sized based a a load calculation for planned use. 60 amp may be oversized. Most residential sheds only need a single circuit or a MWBC.

IF future proofing is desired use an oversized conduit.


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Just follows along with the 200 amp panel per floor and for the kitchen.
 
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To OP, what do you envision needing power for at the shed? Without knowing you usage it will be hard to give direction.
 

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But you don't know the size of this house and the number/type of rooms per floor. The items in each room, etc..... We have 4 bathrooms per floor. Also, we have all commercial grade appliances in our kitchen. Most kitchens do not have 2 large freezers, 4 wall ovens and a 16 eye gas range with 2 ovens in the range. 2 warming drawers, 2 commercial grade coolers, with under counter drawer coolers. an undercounter ice maker, (2) hobart commercials grade dishwashers. (2) 60 qt hobart floor mixers, plus (2) 10 qt countertop mixers, and multiple 7 qt kitchen-aid lift mixers. Many multiple coutertop type appliances. I installed just over 50 outlets, with (2) physical devices per wallbox, setting no more than 4 boxes, or 8 physical devices per circuit. Some circuits have only 2 physical boxes. All appliances in the kitchen are on their own circuit.

We teach cooking and baking to others since my wife and I are professional chefs and the owner of multiple bakeries. We do not charge a fee to attend our classes. We also host many dinners and lunches.
Not knowing what the user is doing, makes your answers to certain questions, incorrect. One cannot assume that everyone has what is referred to as "normal", or the "same as others"
Anyone that does not like the way I do things in my own home, I don't care about your opinion.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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To OP, what do you envision needing power for at the shed? Without knowing you usage it will be hard to give direction.
I think automatically recommending 100 amps to feed a shed without knowing the size or planned use is overkill. The size of the feeder should be sized based a a load calculation for planned use. 60 amp may be oversized. Most residential sheds only need a single circuit or a MWBC.

IF future proofing is desired use an oversized conduit.


Sent from my RCT6A03W13E using Tapatalk
But you don't know the size of this house and the number/type of rooms per floor. The items in each room, etc..... We have 4 bathrooms per floor. Also, we have all commercial grade appliances in our kitchen. Most kitchens do not have 2 large freezers, 4 wall ovens and a 16 eye gas range with 2 ovens in the range. 2 warming drawers, 2 commercial grade coolers, with under counter drawer coolers. an undercounter ice maker, (2) hobart commercials grade dishwashers. (2) 60 qt hobart floor mixers, plus (2) 10 qt countertop mixers, and multiple 7 qt kitchen-aid lift mixers. Many multiple coutertop type appliances. I installed just over 50 outlets, with (2) physical devices per wallbox, setting no more than 4 boxes, or 8 physical devices per circuit. Some circuits have only 2 physical boxes. All appliances in the kitchen are on their own circuit.

We teach cooking and baking to others since my wife and I are professional chefs and the owner of multiple bakeries. We do not charge a fee to attend our classes. We also host many dinners and lunches.
Not knowing what the user is doing, makes your answers to certain questions, incorrect. One cannot assume that everyone has what is referred to as "normal", or the "same as others"
Anyone that does not like the way I do things in my own home, I don't care about your opinion.
He is feeding a shed not the White House.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk
 

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I agree to go 100 amps. #3 cu or #2 al would be adequate especially since you do not actually expect to pull more than 60 amps. I would use THHN instead of a cable. Much easier to pull in a conduit.

#2 aluminum is limited to 90 amps, except as used for a main service feeder. The actual load isn't the determining factor

In this case it's limited to 90.
 

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LOL, I get it Niles. I'm just saying that some folks on here look at my replies as odd. But until you know what it is being used for, or doing, it is difficult to say that it too much, or that is not enough. I agree about the conduit size also, 4 inch is a nice size to use. You never know what you may want later, and it is super easy to pull thru.

In this case, I would go with 100amp service. Once you have power in a location, one can find all kinds of things to do with it.
 
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