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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, thought I was unscrewing a stubborn broken spigot, but turns out I was wrapping the copper until is snapped... (pics below). It has a separate shutoff so no leaks, but the pipe then turns down into the cinder block before heading outside so it cannot be accessed the piping inside.

Question is can a plumber even do anything at this point? Remove more and snake flex pipe in?

Also, how would a plumber have approached this to begin with?
 

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Guapo
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A plumber would not have unscrewed it for the simple reason that there weren't any threads. This time buy a ball valve, a length of pipe & whatever couplings that you need. If you can't reach the inside piece where it broke, run a new pipe to where it can be seen inside the house. Leave the broken piece inside the block. In other words, you are replacing as much of the pipe that is needed. Does that make sense?
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Going to knock some blocks out to repair that.

need to find it inside where it was severed, maybe easier to knock holes in the inside instead of the outside.

and that was built wrong, should have been frost proof spigots, that looks like a indoor spigot for a washer.

ED
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the thoughts.

I'm in Virginia so frost proof is not common, but that is exactly what happened to it during this winter.
 

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Master General ReEngineer
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Thanks for the thoughts.

I'm in Virginia so frost proof is not common, but that is exactly what happened to it during this winter.
Ayuh,..... It would have been Ok, if the outside spigot had been opened, after the inside valve was closed,.....
 

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An experienced plumber would have known the likelihood of wringing the copper pipe in to.

That is a sill cock with a female pipe thread. It screws on the threaded adapter that is soldered onto the end of the copper pipe.

Upon installation the threaded adapter was soldered on to a piece of copper pipe. The sill cock was then threaded onto the adapter.
At that time the adapter could be held with a pipe wrench so that the sill cock could be screwed on far enough for a water tight fit. This assembly was then passed through the wall and a connection was made to the other piping.

Not only is the threaded connection stronger than the copper pipe, that connection has corroded over time making it even more difficult to unscrew.

How to repair this depends primarily on the routing of the piping.


Sorry but I do not understand you description of the pipe routing.

Post pictures of the internal piping or draw a diagram of the piping between the stop and waste valve and the hose bib.

Frost proof hose bibs are often used in Virginia, especially Northern Virginia, for convenience and to reduce the possibility of freezing. Frost proof hose bibs function by the simple fact that they turn the water off inside the structure. Your piping was done the way it is simply because at the time your home was built, a sill cock and a stop and waste valve were cheaper than a frost proof valve.
 

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Property Mgt/Maint
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Thanks for the thoughts.

I'm in Virginia so frost proof is not common, but that is exactly what happened to it during this winter.

Well the last climate forecast I heard was global warming is out, and we may be heading into a mini ice age. So better go frost proof.

That said, you need to find the broken pipe, cut it off and either cap it or re-run the line in the same place. If you don't some one will eventually find the valve that is feeding it and unwittingly turn it on.
 

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Peace be with you
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IF a hose is left on a frostproof faucet it will burst during a freeze cycle...
there are now anti-burst wall faucets that are guaranteed not
to burst from freezing for at least 5 years even with hose left on...
http://www.woodfordmfg.com/woodford/Wall_Faucet_Pages/Model-19.html

that said the code now require a backflow prevention on all outdoor bibs or silcocks; such as the model 101 Woodford's provide anti-siphon protection for use in mild climates only, instead of a screw on back flow devices that can prevent draining in freezing weather
http://www.woodfordmfg.com/Woodford/Wall_Faucet_Pages/model-101.html

A 101PX would allow you to run PEX tubing back to existing isolation valve location & be code compliant with replacement.

here is a Woodford catalog if interested:
http://www.woodfordmfg.com/woodford/Downloads/WoodfordPriceGuide2-1-16.pdf

Peace
 
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Property Mgt/Maint
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One fall I installed a shiny new frost proof spigot on my sisters house. The following spring she informed me the new valve was leaking. And sure enough, she left the hose on with the valve open.
 
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