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Discussion Starter #1
What is the ratio of rough cut oak flooring to the finished floor. In other words, how much waist from the oak I have sawed myself to the finished floor?
 

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You must be leaving out most of the important information. First off, by waste are you referring to the thickness of the wood, in other words you rough cut the wood say 1 inch thick, and you have to plane it down to 3/4 inch thick? Or are you referring to the length, you are going to have to cut pieces to fit the floor? Or are you referring to the fact that not all of the wood is suitable for flooring, i.e. some of it has unacceptable knots, splits, cracks? Or are you referring to the fact that you have to run the wood through a jointer to get straight pieces, then presumably put a tongue and groove edge on the wood?

You need to tell us EXACTLY what it is you plan to do, the exact thickness of the starting pieces, how big the room is, and other important information. Then maybe the forum can help you.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am referring to the fact that not all of the wood is suitable for flooring, i.e. some of it has unacceptable knots, splits, cracks? The room is 450 ft2 and we sawed 550 ft2 of oak 3 in. wide, one inch thick. It will be milled for tongue and groove when dry to 2.5 X 3/4. Do you think the 550 ft2 of rough cut will give us what we need for the 450 ft2 room?
 

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Unless you can post pictures of the wood you cut, it would be impossible for me or anyone else to begin to estimate what fraction of the wood you would consider unsuitable for flooring. This is really a personal decision, I mean a knot that looks good to one person might be a showstopper to you. Also, if you want long boards, the probability of a given board being suitable goes down, whereas if you are willing to cut the knots out by creating say three four foot boards out of a 15 footer, well then you get a much greater yield out of your boards. But you haven't told us how long your boards are, how wide they are, how knotty they are, how straight they are, and how picky you are.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I did say it was 1X3, and it's all either 5,6,or 7 feet long and on the most part clear. There has to me some kind of average that will work here. An 18 inch board will be the minimum length used. I am just looking for a ball park estimate.
 

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Therre are many vayables in sawing logs. It will also depend on if you want the logs plainsawn, rift sawn, or 1/4 sawn. If the logs are 16" in diamiter, it will yeild about 72 board feet of plain sawn wood per the doyle scale. If all logs are between 12" and 16" you will get the best quality lumber with little waist. Where you will get waist from is the size boards you get. Not all boards will come out to the size you're looking for. It will also depend on the how the sawer cuts your logs. Who is drying your lumber? It will take a minimum of 30 days to properly dry Red Oak in a dehumidification kiln. It can take only a few days if it is dried in a vaccum kiln. I would do atleast 900 BF. After the installation you can sell the rest.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
We have quarter sawed the oak ourselves, 1X3X72. We will air dry this wood for a year or so and then have it milled into tongue and groove flooring. I just want to a rough estimate as to how much of this 1X3X72 we will need to end up covering a 450 ft2 floor after milling.
 

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When air or kiln drying make sure and use 1" stickers spaced no more than a 16" apart. And add weight to the top. This will keep warpage down. Also air drying will only dry down to 12 to 15% moisture content. Make sure and put the wood in a place that gets a good breeze. You can dry it down to 6 to 8% by putting it in a garage or basement and adding a dehumidifier. When done don't forget to acclimate the wood to the area to be installed.
 
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