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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just bought a rotozip for cutting out fixture & outlet openings in drywall. Likewise, just made some mistakes using said rotozip.

Most of the mistakes are not having the depth guide deep enough and shooting passed the edge of the fixture/box. The second is overcutting around the little spacing guide tabs on the side of the outlet box.

Anyway, do the rotozip mistake cut lines need mesh tape + float out the area with mud? Or can they just be filled with hot mud?

For the overcut right side of the outlet box - same question. Can this just be layered with hot mud until flush since it will be 80% under the outlet plate? Or does it need tape + mud, and float that area out?



 

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Haha, you have to control the rotozip, don't let the rotozip control you.馃榿
If you're using the hot mud, you could use some of the ultra thin fiber tape along with it, won't hurt. I've fixed Box cutouts like this many times. You'd probably be ok without the tape, but it's a nice safeguard and doesn't take any longer. For the top coat I like to use USG dust control. It's easy to sand and provides a smooth finish.
Mike Hawkins
 

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The one in the first picture really should have mesh tape. I mean, you could gamble a bit and it might end up being ok. I would pre fill with hot mud. After it dries, apply the fiberglas tape and float on another coat of hot mud. Finish it off with regular joint compound. Nice thing about those kind of mistakes is that you really don't have to float out too far with your mud, if at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Haha, you have to control the rotozip, don't let the rotozip control you.馃榿
It鈥檚 a tricky one haha. First I put too much pressure against the outlet and zip right through the plastic, then I let off pressure and end up veering off and cutting too far out. PITA!

But sounds good. I鈥檒l pick up some of the ultra thin mesh tape, prefill flush with hot mud and then tape + mud.
 

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It鈥檚 a tricky one haha. First I put too much pressure against the outlet and zip right through the plastic, then I let off pressure and end up veering off and cutting too far out. PITA!
I had a similar experience. Also, since the drywall hangs at an angle relative to the box until the box is cut out, the ideal depth of the guidepoint bit varies. And if the box isn't perfectly square to where the new wall will be (which can easily happen if the stud aren't perfectly square), that adds to the varying depth.

So yeah, I found it wasn't anywhere near as easy as the youtube videos, where they zip around the box without cutting out too much drywall or cutting into the (plastic) box.

Subscribed to thread, since I'll have to make the same repairs.
 

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Just bought a rotozip for cutting out fixture & outlet openings in drywall. Likewise, just made some mistakes using said rotozip.

Most of the mistakes are not having the depth guide deep enough and shooting passed the edge of the fixture/box. The second is overcutting around the little spacing guide tabs on the side of the outlet box.

Anyway, do the rotozip mistake cut lines need mesh tape + float out the area with mud? Or can they just be filled with hot mud?

For the overcut right side of the outlet box - same question. Can this just be layered with hot mud until flush since it will be 80% under the outlet plate? Or does it need tape + mud, and float that area out?



If I were doing this I would trim the paper carefully back from each cut edge with a razor blade, then hot mud it. I would fill the cracks so that they bulge out just a little. When the hot mud is hard but still wet I would take a 2-4" spackle knife and carefully shave any ridges down. After everything is dry (next day at least) I would skim coat once more with hot mud, let dry, sand, prime and paint. I would not bother using any type of tape with these cuts. I seriously doubt they will ever crack, especially if you use Durabond hot mud.

siffleur
 

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An oscillating tool is much easier to control for this type of cutting in sheetrock and you get much straighter cuts.

For small patch jobs like yours I use the more expensive spackling paste as it can be used with a gap of up to 3/8". It is twice the cost of drywall mud but when paying $6 for a pint for the spackle it is not a concern.
 

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All you have to do is clean up the edges of the paper and fill them.
 
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