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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Everyone - Question for you. I'm planning on building a shed on an existing slab. I cannot build the entire slab as the corner is too close my neighbors property line, and there are other issues with town permits, etc. The slab is 20'x15' - The shed will be 16'x12'. Many have said that if the shed is centered, the sill plat will frequently get wet, and I'll need to use cinder block or similar material to raise the shed up. I understand this concern. I'm wondering if I could use something like Trex or similar product as the sill plate - are there materials that I can use that are rot resistant ?

Thank you
 

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retired framer
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Hey Everyone - Question for you. I'm planning on building a shed on an existing slab. I cannot build the entire slab as the corner is too close my neighbors property line, and there are other issues with town permits, etc. The slab is 20'x15' - The shed will be 16'x12'. Many have said that if the shed is centered, the sill plat will frequently get wet, and I'll need to use cinder block or similar material to raise the shed up. I understand this concern. I'm wondering if I could use something like Trex or similar product as the sill plate - are there materials that I can use that are rot resistant ?

Thank you
Just build the wall and sheet it and put a peel ans stick down on the concrete to keep the water out.
Then cover that up with a flashing before the siding.
Building Water Wood Asphalt Automotive exterior
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply - Where the shed is flush with the foundation edge, I can do that. Since the shed dimensions will be smaller than the slab, in some areas the peel in stick would cover the sill plate, but it would not be able to cover the foundation. I had planned on using a sill gasket and then I can place the peel & stick on the side of the sill plate. That would probably protect it. thanks again
 

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retired framer
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Thanks for the reply - Where the shed is flush with the foundation edge, I can do that. Since the shed dimensions will be smaller than the slab, in some areas the peel in stick would cover the sill plate, but it would not be able to cover the foundation. I had planned on using a sill gasket and then I can place the peel & stick on the side of the sill plate. That would probably protect it. thanks again
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A "Handy Husband"
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I would install a single course of block to keep the wood off the slab. Cheap and easy to do.
 

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I wouldn't use the stick on like that. Who knows how long the glue will stay water tight? At least the slab will have to be sealed or such against spalling or dusting, if there's even a way to do that for long term. If using a stick on, I would start the siding with synthe band trim that can be unscrewed so stick on can be replaced in future. The band will keep the siding off the ground too. Drip edge over the band and before the siding. Door will be vulnerable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Others have suggested anchoring a row of block to the slab and attaching the sill to that. If using traditional cinder block, the extra 8" would make this too high - the slab is 10" thick and is several inches above grade. I build an 8x8 shed on a 9x9 slab that was in the same area of the yard. I used a sill gasket and attached flashing against the sides of the sill, but the roof overhang protects that one. The sill is anchored with the redhed galvanized wedge anchors - thanks
 

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Hey Everyone - Question for you. I'm planning on building a shed on an existing slab. I cannot build the entire slab as the corner is too close my neighbors property line, and there are other issues with town permits, etc. The slab is 20'x15' - The shed will be 16'x12'. Many have said that if the shed is centered, the sill plat will frequently get wet, and I'll need to use cinder block or similar material to raise the shed up. I understand this concern. I'm wondering if I could use something like Trex or similar product as the sill plate - are there materials that I can use that are rot resistant ?

Thank you
Depending on how old you are and how long you need
it to last, pressure treated lumber should work just fine.
 
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