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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am awaiting the report from my insurance company regarding the adjustors report on my roof that sustained damage due to wind and hail. I contacted a roofer that was recently used by my neighbor. I asked if he could give me and estimate and he said he needed to see the insurance companies report first. This morning he was at my door as he was also looking at the neighbors roof. He asked if he could get on the roof and I said yes. He then asked if I had received the insurance companies report. I told him, "No, not yet" (It has been six days since the adjustor was here). He again said he couldn't give me an estimate unless he saw the report and asked what I was paying for my deductible and that he would see that he could "eat it". Why exactly does he need to see the report before giving me an estimate?
My gut feeling is he is playing me. Any comments?
 

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Storm Chaser CON-tractors do not measure roofs or give estimates.

They want to find out what your insurance company is paying and then have you sign a blank contract contingency form to use them to do the roof.

Although it is helpful for a knowledgeable roofer familiar with the claims process and the insurance industry "Guess-timate" of the costs, the figure provided from the insurance company is in NO WAY the final verdict and amount that can be paid.

If you find a contractor who has been established in your local area under the same name for longer than 10 years and sign a contract with them for their price, your insurance company will be legally obligated to reimburse you the entire amount for the replacement cost for Like Kind And Quality of materials, plus any insurable Code Upgrades that may have come into effect since the last roof was installed.

You have what is called, "Replacement Cost" coverage in the standard HO-3 Insurance Policy.

Find the contractor who you KNOW will still be around in your area longer than it takes to do your roof and the others in your neighborhood and use them.

They are local and you will be supporting your local economy and one of your near by business neighbors that way.

The "Contingency Agreement" that the Storm Chaser will want you to sign will allow him to basically be assigned "Power Of Attorney" over your claim rights.

A legal contract must specify what types of materials will be used, what work will be done and a price for how much it will cost.

Also, although not highly enforced, it is a felony to keep additional funds not spent towards the insurable loss.

Also, it is a crime by the contractor to offer to sweeten the pot by paying for your deductible amount.

When you sign a contract with someone, have them provide you two price options:

One for the replacement of everything exactly like it is and replaced with same kind and quality.

Second one for the upgraded shingles and ventilation options you probably are considering.

You pay the difference for the upgraded choices, not your insurance company.

Is there anything else that you would like to know about?

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you Ed. I feel much better armed with your information. This roofer is local and has been in business since 1990.

I appreciate your help.
 

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I'm not a roofer, but I'm under thee impression that there is no difference between a ridge vent and mushroom vents as long as the combined cross-sectional area is the same.

I have used both as a DIY'er and it seemed to me that ridge venting was less labor intensive than the mushrooms.
Limited cap cutting and nailing!
 

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Much difference in the style of venting used.

On a 50 foot long ridge line on a gable style roof, the Shingle Vent II would provide 18 square inches of Exhaist NFVA per lineal foot, which would result in a total of 900 square inches of NFVA for the Exhaust portion of the required NFVA for the attic/roof assembly.

To accomplish a similar quantity of total exhaust utilizing the standard RV-50/51 Mushroom Vents, also known as static air vents or pots or as turtle vents, you would need to install 18 of them along the rear plane of the roof surface, or approximately 1 every 3 feet.

The air flowage, although identical in total NFVA, is still not continuous and they are not installed at the highest point of the roof, which is thr ridge line at the peak of the roof, so the flowage of exhaust is not uniform across the entire length of the roof.

Now, the reality is, that NO ONE would install 18 mushroom vents on that roof. It would be anywhere between 4 to 8, so the net result is a greatly diminished attic ventilation scenario.

Ed
 

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Much difference in the style of venting used.

On a 50 foot long ridge line on a gable style roof, the Shingle Vent II would provide 18 square inches of Exhaist NFVA per lineal foot, which would result in a total of 900 square inches of NFVA for the Exhaust portion of the required NFVA for the attic/roof assembly.

To accomplish a similar quantity of total exhaust utilizing the standard RV-50/51 Mushroom Vents, also known as static air vents or pots or as turtle vents, you would need to install 18 of them along the rear plane of the roof surface, or approximately 1 every 3 feet.

The air flowage, although identical in total NFVA, is still not continuous and they are not installed at the highest point of the roof, which is thr ridge line at the peak of the roof, so the flowage of exhaust is not uniform across the entire length of the roof.

Now, the reality is, that NO ONE would install 18 mushroom vents on that roof. It would be anywhere between 4 to 8, so the net result is a greatly diminished attic ventilation scenario.

Ed
Thanks for the explanation! It makes sense that a ridge vent would be the most efficient and cost effective method.
One thing that I wonder, is what is the effect of the ridge board on air flow through the ridge. eg. a 2X8 ridge board?
 

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Thanks for the explanation! It makes sense that a ridge vent would be the most efficient and cost effective method.
One thing that I wonder, is what is the effect of the ridge board on air flow through the ridge. eg. a 2X8 ridge board?
The instructions require the slot width to be cut a little wider in Ridge Board situations to allow for the same amount of exhaust flowage capacity.

Ed
 

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Here's the deal from both sides

The Contractor needs to see your paperwork so he knows what is being replaced, so the estimate can be competitive with others you get. IMO, the prices should all be very close. Although if one contractor is replacing 23 square and all the drip edge, then his price will be higher than 23 square and no drip edge. Now, what did the insurance pay for? What do you want done?


On the other hand we have some cheap homeowners up here in the last couple storms. They get the insurance estimate, collect the money, then go out for the lowest bid, acting like it is their money in their bank account. The cheaper it is, the more they can keep for themselves. Usually what they get, is a few bucks in their pocket and a thousand headaches later. Happened here a few years ago. Luckily these people got another storm and are getting things fixed up right by good contractors.

It's a huge game, and I hate it!!
The best advice is to get someone that you trust and don't try to screw them. Hopefully they won't screw you.
 

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The contractor you mentioned as already offered to commit a crime to get the job, paying for your deductible. What more reason do you need to look elsewhere? If he's willing to commit a crime, what kind of work and craftsmanship is going to give you?
 
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