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Discussion Starter #1
New here and first post so thanks in advance for any and all advice/input. House built in 1970 and needing a remodel for a long time...and it's now time. Main question is concerning a two piece ridge beam through the length of the house gable end to gable end. When taking the covering of the range hood exhaust where it exits the ceiling alongside the ridge beam I found a surprise to me, what I thought was a single span of beam was in fact 2 end butted to each other with the section spanning about 8 feet to the gable end.
The partial wall under the break is going bye bye to open it up and enlarge the kitchen. The wall bottom plate looks to be right over the floor joist and has 3 2x4's as a support for the beam and 2 small lengths of 2x4 on top of the wall toenailed together up against the joint in the beam....it doesn't seem to be doing much in the line of support and the beam has no sag in this area.
How should I support this joint properly? In my mind I'm thinking some steel plate on either side of the beam lagged to it with a 4x6 supporting underneath to the floor as a post..????.... I wish there was no need as we plan to have a see through layout and that is whereabouts we figured a cook top would be but that is how this whole project has been going for me along the way it seems. I'm learning at all this as I go.
 

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JOATMON
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Welcome to our forum.

Cut to the chase.....don't attempt anything without input from an engineer.

The only 'proper' way to do away with the post is to replace the whole beam. Due to the increased span, the existing beam is not going to be large enough. Additionally, the footing under the posts at each end needs to be examined to make sure it can take the additional load.

Even your existing setup is likely not to present code. It should have a Simpson post cap there.
 

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You can replace the two part beam with a single beam, probably would need to be a steel beam. Design of such a beam requires careful analysis of all the loads on the beam, and design of the support columns for the beam ends.

If you do not want to spend the time and money replacing the two part beam, you will need a support similar to what you have, but connected better to the beam. Also a good idea to have a careful look at the support for the post. I did a similar project in my house, did not want a post in the middle of the room, so I installed a steel beam. You may be able to get a steel supplier to design the beam for you, they will roll the design cost into the steel cost. You would need to give them a dimensioned plan of the framing, hopefully they have an engineer on retainer to do the design and stamp the plans you will likely need for the building permit.
 

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That triple 2x4 that you think is not doing too much is probably holding up your roof. This s not a diy removal. You need a stamped drawing from an engineer.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the incoming opinions guys! The reason I don't think it's doing much is the 2 short pieces of 2x4 on top of the wall that are directly under the beam are sitting on top of the sheetrock covering the wall with about a 1/4" of space between the blocking and wall. Can't see that in the photos but it's actually just floating above the wall. You can grab the end of the wall with your hand and it easily wags back and forth, there's no wieght sitting on it.
Just had the roof redone (EPDM) years ago as well, no sagging and solid. Regardless I do still want a proper post under the joint.
 

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It may not be doing much, but it probably is supposed to do something.

That doesn't change the need for engineering, just means it may go faster and easier when you do the work.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Looks like I will be contacting an engineer to give me a plan. I was thinking if I "better'd" what is there it couldn't help but be more than sufficient since it's survived so long (built in 1970 and I've lived here since 1993) without any issues.... I do agree that an engineer would take any guess work out of the equation.
 

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JOATMON
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Looks like I will be contacting an engineer to give me a plan. I was thinking if I "better'd" what is there it couldn't help but be more than sufficient since it's survived so long (built in 1970 and I've lived here since 1993) without any issues.... I do agree that an engineer would take any guess work out of the equation.
Smart move.

Building standards evolve. And while it may have 'survived' this long, it doesn't mean it's the best way to do it.

Yes, you can over build. And you can also marginally build....which is how a lot of it was done. There is no extra profit for a builder to over build. They do just the min. One of the reasons you see specs getting tighter and tighter.

Case in point....the floor joists in my house are 2x8's 16" OC. The rear section of the house is a 14' span. Per current code....that is too far, they should at least be 2x10.

For my addition, my greatest span is 14'...but I'm using 2x12 12" OC. With 1 1/8" T&G plywood as the sub floor. Is that more than required? Yup....but I'm really glad. It's a great floor to walk on. And when you are down below, you don't hear anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I most certainly understand, I too believe in overbuilding. I demo'd my old garage a couple years ago and rebuilt with a second open ceiling construction. My upstairs floor joists are 12" bci's 12" on center as are my roof rafters. I built a platform lift that drops out of the upstairs ceiling with a surface area of 4.5' x 7' and store my 4 wheelers, dirt bikes etc up there.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I planned from the beginning to have a warm storage above the garage to utilize. A lift system makes all the sense in the world for such an area, I wouldn't do it any other way. And Jeeps..wow getting off subject but yes we like our Jeeps. Have owned my 95' XJ since new with 90,000 miles on it now and clean as they come. Long live the trusty 4.0 is my hopes, why they ever discontinued it is beyond me.
The other in the family is the 09' with a few modifications as well...then there's the 53' m38a1 that belongs to a very good friend of mine.
 

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JOATMON
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I have that same sign.



5.7L TBI, 6" lift, ARB rear, Detroit front, full roll cage...etc, etc.

The old Cherokee....it was an 89 with the POS Renix FI setup. Your setup is much better. At 90K it's just getting broke in. About the only issue you might be having right now is the rear main. Easy to do.



Does that 53 still have the original 'Iron Duke' in it?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Good looking Jeeps you have there. Yea the 4.0 is quite solid, no issues whatsoever, the 53' is also a 350 SBC conversion... vette heads, cam and electronic ignition. Front clip is actually CJ but he made his own flat fenders and since this pic made a slat front grille that turned out very nice with the stock flip around headlights. Once things slow down on the house if ever I'll do some mods on my Xj.
 
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