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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a 10x10 pergola covering a section of my patio that I would like to make rain proof and snow proof.

I’m thinking about putting corrugate pvc roof panels over the existing structure. It has a slight slope to it already away from the house following the slope of the poured concrete patio.
How much slope do I need for the pvc panels?

any other ideas? With or without removing the existing structure?
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Naildriver
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Can you post pictures so we can see what you see? Snow load will exceed the plastic panels' ability to hold it.
 
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How much snow you receive will depend on your climate zone.
Average corrugated pvc supported on 24" centers is good for around 40 psf of snow, which equates to 2 ft deep of average wet snow.
Having a flat roof adjacent to a sloped house roof means that it will be subject to drifting snow, so the depth on your flat pergola roof may greatly exceed the stated snowfall.
If you live in a northern state with significant snowfall, then I don't think a flat roof will be a very good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How much snow you receive will depend on your climate zone.
Average corrugated pvc supported on 24" centers is good for around 40 psf of snow, which equates to 2 ft deep of average wet snow.
Having a flat roof adjacent to a sloped house roof means that it will be subject to drifting snow, so the depth on your flat pergola roof may greatly exceed the stated snowfall.
If you live in a northern state with significant snowfall, then I don't think a flat roof will be a very good idea.
We are in central Indiana. It is rare to get more than 6 inches of snow at a time and it usually melts within a few days. This faces south so will get direct sun as well.

how much slope do you think I need? I’m trying to figure out the easiest way to raise the existing structure height near the house to allow better slope
 

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Metal corrugated...or painted metal sales panel. I just crunched numbers on my shed roof and it was like $1.4/sq ft for unpainted metal or $1/sq ft for pvc that can melt in AZ sunshine...or about $1/sq ft for ondura corrugated asphalt. Painted metal is $1.4/sq ft but the lengths did not cooperate so i plan to paint it once the oils weather off.
Id go with painted metal if the lengths are available. It is most durable.

Maybe leave the structure legs alone and eliminate those 1x top purlins and then add some wedges to the top of the 2x purlins for slope.
 

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We are in central Indiana. It is rare to get more than 6 inches of snow at a time and it usually melts within a few days. This faces south so will get direct sun as well.

how much slope do you think I need? I’m trying to figure out the easiest way to raise the existing structure height near the house to allow better slope
6" isn't much snow. You could lower the outboard beam 4 - 6" and have enough fall to drain rainwater nicely. Try lowering it one bolt spacing, then you only have to drill new holes for the lower bolts.
I suspect you are thinking translucent PVC panels to let some light in?

UPDATE: I just noticed, those aren't really beams at either end, they are just 2x6's. This pergola clearly isn't stressed to support a roof. I also noticed that the rafters have splice plates at midspan, which creates a weak spot. I wouldn't add a roof to this pergola at all unless you beef it up with roof beams at either end, and continuous rafters without splices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
so can anyone make some design suggestions or link to plans for a free standing patio structure I can cover with corrugated pvc or polycarbonate panels?

like 4x4 posts with front lower that back. 2x6 connecting each post then joist hangers on the back 2x6 to run 2x4s (6s?) from the hanger on the back to sitting on top of the front 2x6. Then would I need perpendicular 2x2s on top of that?

Would something like that work or does it need to be more complex?

how would I space the 2x4s? Do I have to use bolts or would screws be sufficient?

I'd be inclined to move that pergola somewhere else and build a new patio cover.
 

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You're asking basic questions that are really open-ended. You really need the services of a designer who is familiar with your local climate and local building codes. We could throw links at you to free plans on the internet, but it wouldn't be doing you any favor because most plans have to be adjusted or adapted to the local climate, to attach to the specific condition of your existing structure, and need to comply with local building codes and restrictions.
Contact a local house designer, and they should be able to custom design a patio cover for five or six hundred bucks, with detailed plans that will pass muster with your local building department.
If you can't afford that, you might try your local college and see if an architecture or engineering student might take on your design as his school project.
 
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