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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve never had a rook leak before; therefore, never fixed one on my own. I know I have the ability to fix it on my own if I could remove the tiles and look for what and where the problem is. However; the city in which I live, requires a work permit and plans if a home owner wants to do the repairs on his own. I can’t get away without a permit because they have city workers driving the neighborhoods on a regular basis.

Does anyone know of a basic roof repair tutorial I could look at so I have an idea of what to present to the city building department? Or can someone just tell me of materials needed and how to present plans to the city?

For example; when I totally rebuilt my master bathroom (which I gutted to the foundation and cement walls), I presented my step by step plans and a list of materials to the city building department. Even though I never rebuilt a bathroom before, I proved to the city I could do this work by presenting them with plans. After modifying my plans a 2nd time, they accepted my plans and gave me a work permit to begin work (my main source of knowledge for this work was from a web site I found). My work was inspected a few times by persons of various specialties (electrical, plumber, builder) throughout the building process and at completion, the city signed off as satisfactorily completed. So when I sell the house, I can present this to any potential buyer and they can buy with confidence.

Rebuilding a bathroom involves electrical, plumbing and construction of tile, cement, metal and wood. I don’t think a leaky roof will be as intuitive. I have leaks at the front porch and back porch. For now, I am concentrating on the front roof section and showing pic’s of the damaged area.

Thank you.
 

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Hammered Thumb
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A permit for a small repair seems very suffocating. You have a lot of soffit damage there. My first guess is that without a downspout there, during heavy rains the water backs up at the L leg because the rest of the gutter along the house is filled. So water backs up under the tile and down the fascia running back over the soffit.

I spy a goat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A permit for a small repair seems very suffocating. You have a lot of soffit damage there. My first guess is that without a downspout there, during heavy rains the water backs up at the L leg because the rest of the gutter along the house is filled. So water backs up under the tile and down the fascia running back over the soffit.

I spy a goat.
So for starters, perhaps I should install a downspout.

(Yes, a 67 GTO) (-:
 

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retired framer
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Have you been in the attic during a rain storm looking for water running down the rafter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I took off a few tiles (broke a few too) and here’s what I found (see pic’s). So, by looking at this disaster, who can tell me what materials I need and steps I need to take to make repairs on this leak. Also, I’ll be putting my house on the market for sale in about two months. I say this because there’s probably a cheap repair verses a quality repair. I don’t want to do anything unethical, but just wanted to bring this up.
 

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retired framer
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I took off a few tiles (broke a few too) and here’s what I found (see pic’s). So, by looking at this disaster, who can tell me what materials I need and steps I need to take to make repairs on this leak. Also, I’ll be putting my house on the market for sale in about two months. I say this because there’s probably a cheap repair verses a quality repair. I don’t want to do anything unethical, but just wanted to bring this up.
That has to be stripped back at least until you have a few feet with out rot.
Depending on how bad it is some of that might need to be re structured right to the peak.

Be care up there. you don't know if the structure will take your weight when you get on just one joist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You should get help from an expert roofing contractor. Make sure the contractor has good knowledge of roofing.
Done that, he quoted $1200. This is a “Do It Yourself Forum”, Yes?

I would much prefer have a pro do this job, but hiring one needs to be compared to “funds” and “time” I have available.
 

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retired framer
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Done that, he quoted $1200. This is a “Do It Yourself Forum”, Yes?

I would much prefer have a pro do this job, but hiring one needs to be compared to “funds” and “time” I have available.

Are you going to continue on you own and do you have a plan or do you need one.
 

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Hammered Thumb
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I don't see a quick easy fix. The soffits can't be lipsticked and the inspector will likely see this from the attic if enough of the sheathing isn't torn back, so by then it will be a proper job anyway.

$1200 sounds like a good price - as long as it included tearing back more, new plywood, fascia, soffit, membrane, supplying the broken roof tiles, and reinstalling the gutter. DIY is fine, just depends on how crunched for time you are within the next couple months, and that whole crazy permit thang.
 
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