DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently moved into a house and began renovating the basement. During renovations, we discovered that water had been leaking through the pressure treated wood foundation into the walls. The root cause is incorrectly graded gutters and poor grading from the house. I am in the process of correcting these issues.

The handyman I have working on the sheet rock suggested that we spread Seal Best All-Weather Roofing Cement on the wood foundation, then place foam insulation boards over the top of that, then a layer of 6 mil plastic, then the sheet rock. The idea would be to create one more layer of safety from getting moisture in the basement... Trusting his suggestion, I told him to go ahead. Just got home after he closed up the sheet rock, and notice that the fumes are pretty heavy. Will these fumes air out? Has anyone else seen this done before?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,975 Posts
The best approach is to waterproof from the outside.
Foam also acts as a vapour barrier, so now you have two of them which presents a condensation issue.

The fumes do go away, but it will take some time especially since the product is encapsulated.

As to any Health concerns, read the Material Safety Data Sheet for the product. The MSDS will be available from the supplier or manufacturer's web site usually.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the suggestion. MSDS does say that fumes can cause light headedness (which I can confirm!), dizziness, and vomiting. I am just hoping they air out so that we don't have to tear back into the walls and try to remove it.

He has physically pressed the foam boards into the roof cement, using it as an adhesive to the interior side of the wood foundation. He then filled the seams with spray foam insulation. Does that still create the condensation issue of two vapor barriers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,587 Posts
I would expect that the asphalt and petroleum distillates might dissolve the foam, depending on what kind of foam was used.

Foam adhesive is generally low voc or latex.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I agree 100%. Should have done more research before giving the go ahead. Think this is a big enough disaster to tear the walls back open and try to undo it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,587 Posts
Your call, but I wouldnt want it in my house. That's just plain.... well, I don't have anything more constructive to say so i'll leave it at that...

Good luck getting it off the walls at this point. What a holy mess that will be.
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
51,234 Posts
Water proofing the inside will not happen, you need to understand what can be done for water management before building the interior.
 

·
retired painter
Joined
·
11,830 Posts
I'd be incline to leave it and provide fresh air ventilation to push out the fumes. While I don't agree with your handyman's 'fix' I'm not sure tearing it out will accomplish anything unless you replace plywood and all. You'd have to scrape and then scrub with a solvent to remove most of the tar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the advice everyone. It definitely would be preferable to leave what's been done alone ($$), so I'm inclined to give it a try. Planning to air it out as well as I can, then close everything up and see if the fuming continues.

When water was discovered in the wall, would it have been better to just leave the leaky wood foundation as-is and only address the gutters and grading from the house? Need to assume I don't have the budget to excavate the basement all around the house and waterproof/damp-proof from the outside. Curious what someone with more experience would have done in this situation.

I'm going to be reaching out to some other contractors today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,419 Posts
As stated, waterproofing is done on the outside with gutters, downspout extensions and grading. What you had done was water mitigation, though not in any standard way of which I've ever heard.

I don't think I would ever hire this contractor again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,975 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: Nik333
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top