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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a small triangular bump out area on my roof, it's over the roof of the original house and at the base of the second story addition. It's has a stucco coat over wood frame with a crack around it's perimeter, water has leaked inside and damaged the soffit and fascia directly underneath. It's what I showed in red circle in the image below.









I called a roofing contractor for the repairs. They came and took it apart and it turned out this is where EVERYTHING (electrical, water supply lines, 3" PVC drain, central AC refrigerant and condensate lines, coaxial cables, old phone lines etc...) goes from the first floor to the second floor.





The wood framing of the bump is badly rotted. After seeing this I suggested to the roofer that I want to approach the repair differently. That I would like to square out the triangular bump and I would like some sort of an access like a door so I can make necessary repairs in the future.


So this is the new rectangular wood structure using PT 2X4 with 3/4" plywood. It is about 24" wide, 32" deep and 48" tall. The opening in the front is the access opening.





They then put roofing paper over the whole thing, and flashing around the base.





My questions:


(1) Flashing - Shouldn't there be flashing along the vertical edge on the right side? In other words, make a vertical cut on the stucco wall another 8" to 10", and put flashing on that vertical inside corner tying to the existing membrane? The roofer says only the bottom perimeter needs flashing.


(2) Roof - How would you do the "roof" of this square bump? It's 24"X32" in size. Do you do it like a normal flat roof? Put aluminum drip edges around it then asphalt roofing on top, or some peel and stick type?


(3) Lath attachment - I need to put a coat of stucco on it. I am not sure whether I would ask the roofer to do it, or I will get a stucco contractor, or I will do it myself. This is too small a job for a stucco contractor I think. In any case I am wondering about what is the best way to fasten metal lath onto the felt covered plywood. I assume I cannot use regular lath screws because that would make holes through the felt and water will eventually find it's way back to the wood?


(4) Access door - any suggestion what would be a good access door that would seal against the weather? Make something out of wood? Sheet metal? Find a dorm size refrigerator and use it's door LOL?


Thanks in advance for any comment or suggestion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
well, I didn't expect to find the nexus of the universe under that leaking bump. I had to think quick on the revisions while I had the crew on the roof waiting while I talked to their boss who was driving to and from jobs and trying to explain what I wanted to do differently and how he would have to price it differently. He couldn't be at my job that day, and he would have charged me if I had stopped the job while I think, and rain is predicted the next day...plus the crew speaks Spanish only and I speak English to their boss who then translate to them while we were all standing up there. I don't think I can explain in words what I wanted done except to make a square box.

But my contraints are:

(1) One main objectives of the revised configuration is to provide an access opening, and the opening has to be where it is now facing outward because that's a straight shot into a 12X12 chase across the bottom of a 14' long closet leading all the way to the bathroom and beyond. So if I need to run any pipes and conduits it is the most direct path. My concern is whatever door I put there should be on a vertical face to minimize possible water intrusion through the door.

(2) A box with a close to flat top (the back is 1.5" higher than the front over 32") so there is a gentle slope. When I need to work on stuff in the future I can use it to lay down tools and parts instead of a sloped concrete tile roof to minimize having to bend over 1000 times.

(3) Frankly any design that is not squared up I really doubt the crew can handle the numerous compound mitered cuts that are required and the additional time it would take to get it right. If I do it myself I can do it but I don't like working on roofs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Any thoughts on how to attach metal lath to the box for stucco application? I also haven't figured out what kind of access door or panel cover I need to install in the front.
 

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To simplify things a little, there is really no need for an access door. I do not see a single wire connection in the pic, just wires passing through. It is essentially a wall cavity. Generally access points are reserved to wire termination points, and junctions. The access is just as likely to leak water in as it is to provide any inspection benefit. IMHO


Stay away from a total flat roof. Put some slope on it down and away from the wall to prevent water from backing up into the wall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It is not for inspection, it is for access that I know I will need. This is where there is a direct access (although somewhat congested) from the top of the one story house to the crawlspace underneath it, and where things changed direction to ho horizontal across the bottom of the entire second story addition.



I need an access door because now that I know this is where things are, I will need to run ADDITIONAL wires through (CAT6 and electrical), and I also have a water line repipe project to replace existing polybutylene to PEX so that my insurance company would cover water damages. If I do not do a door now, I will have to cut into this bump 2 months from now, and six months from now, and may be a year from now.


Now does it need to be a real door that swings open and close? No. It could be any sort of cover panel that can be removed without to much difficulty.
 

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What's done is done. I'd have kept it a triangle and make a cap that slips over the structure as well as the step and eave flashing around the base. If you add frame over the top and the sides, like the small windows above, you can add rubber seal behind the frame as well as some caulk (when you need to go back in). I think I'd cover all of the small triangle roof with roll roofing and flash to the box sides.


Access door could be made with overlapping door. Rubber seals around the sides and a small drip edge over the top, kind of small roof to kick away the water and rain.
 

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The existing stucco wall should have flashing on top of the roof.The side of the bump out should have step flashing installed with the shingles. I would fabricate a one piece metal cap for the top and slide it under the wall flashing.
 
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