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Discussion Starter #1
:surprise:painters,

I'm painting 2 rooms in an old house. Both are kind of funky with curved ceilings, multiple windows with victorian trim plus odd shaped closets that will be painted. This is a lived in house, but of course rooms will be emptied out for painting. Just wondering best way to go about this and how to decide between brush/roll and spraying. Do some of you ALWAYS spray? Is it generally worth it to go through all the work of masking since spraying is so fast. Each room is 2 colors, one for walls and one for trim.

Spraying question-how do you handle the overspray that gets in the air? Open a window, completely tarp the floor? Should the door to the room be sealed with tape so overspray does not float to other areas of the house?

Thanks for your insights!

C
 

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retired painter
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I seldom spray inside an occupied home. All the prep and extra cleanup normally negates any time savings. Containing overspray is a lot more involved than just shutting the door, it needs to be sealed off along with any HVAC registers. Opening the window means the overspray will travel outside ..... and land on what? car, siding, patio furniture, roof ??
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Okay, thanks for the information.

Leaning towards brush and roll. Guess I'm just exploring options for all the fussy painting this will involve. It's not a typical 10x10 room with a couple windows and a door.

I appreciate hearing your experience.
 

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I seldom spray inside an occupied home. All the prep and extra cleanup normally negates any time savings. Containing overspray is a lot more involved than just shutting the door, it needs to be sealed off along with any HVAC registers. Opening the window means the overspray will travel outside ..... and land on what? car, siding, patio furniture, roof ??
Everybody here loves the Idaho Painter, correct? :wink2:

Here's a video of him spraying in his own home.


If you FF to about 9 minutes you'll see a table with lamp not covered at all. Granted he is using a FF tip that creates less over spray. Graco now has a FFLP tip that's even better.
 

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It can be done, particularly with everything out of the room, but there will be a lot more prep than if you brush and roll it. Either way, you'll have to cover the floor, but with spraying, you'll have to mask off windows, doors, trim and any vents. You'll have to seal yourself in there while you spray, and wear a respirator. If you do go that route, go easy on the spray and be ready to back roll.

I'd go the brush and roller method. Get yourself a wide roller (14" or 18") with an extension (I have a couple Wooster Sherlocks, 2'-4' and 4'-8' that work great) and you should be able to move right along at a good clip. Good luck.

John
 

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I know we get many posts/questions about using a sprayer, but, truth be told, it's not always the "magic elixir" that we sometimes think it is. In fact, there can be as much, if not more, work involved using a sprayer. I don't use one very often because I've had several insurance claims for overspray, one, in particular, involved getting blue overspray on a gold Trans Am. Needless to say, I'm very picky about when and where I use a sprayer. Just my two cents.
 

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sorry, just joined and this is my first post. This post got my attention though. Is spackling not the correct way to fill in nail holes?
I dont see anything wrong with it. I usually use putty though, but I see nothing wrong with using spackle. Some painters like to mix Crawfords spackle with wood filler. I've never tried it, but I think I will.
 

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retired painter
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How long do y'all bake your nail filler? does it come with gravy? :biggrin2:

Spackling is more apt to get knocked out if the woodwork receives a hard hit and also tends to shrink [needs a 2nd coat] It also requires priming if the nail holes are filled between primer and enamel. The only time I use spackling or joint compound on wood work is when I'm trying to fix a carpenter's goof.
 
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