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Rim Joist Repair

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My home is a 1926 Dutch Colonial, and we're having a new front walkway and stoop put in. After the demo today, I got a look at the rim joist below and to either side of the front door. I probably won't try to do this repair myself, but whether I do or hire someone, what would be considered best practices for replacing this rotted wood?

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My home is a 1926 Dutch Colonial, and we're having a new front walkway and stoop put in. After the demo today, I got a look at the rim joist below and to either side of the front door. I probably won't try to do this repair myself, but whether I do or hire someone, what would be considered best practices for replacing this rotted wood?

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Do the floor joist run perpendicular to the rim?

By the way sometimes they can be saved depending on how much good wood you have left.
 

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No, the floor joists run parallel.




The inside area is a finished basement, so no real access without tearing into the drywall.
Tricky one. If you replace it, your kind of hoping the subfloor will hold it up.

You should scratch away at it and see how much is good. Being old growth you may have a chance that there is enough meat.
 

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Understood on checking under the door.

The masonry company doing the stoop and walkway has a contractor they deal with for issues like these, and he's going to come out tomorrow to see what's what. Thing is, he'll tell the supervisor of the masonry job what he thinks (including a cost estimate) not me, and then I'll get that info secondhand from the supervisor later in the day.

Given that the stoop has already been demoed and it's moving toward the end of November, I'm feeling like there's a chance I'll be rushed into getting this repaired by the masonry co.'s contractor. He may be fine, but I want to arm myself with as much info as possible to a) make sure I understand all of the repair options, b) be certain that I can or can't do it myself, and c) not get ripped off price wise (I know you guys can't help me with that last part).
You should first trust that your contractor will do the right thing.

Did he do something that makes you think he's not trustworthy?

If you don't trust him you should sever the partnership.
 

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We see concrete against wood all the time causing problems, trusting the contractor is not a good idea.
Knowing what you need and want and being sure you are getting it is the only protection to be had.
I disagree, in life you must trust people. Most contractors will do the right thing because it's in their best interest.

What I mainly wanted to know, was has he done something to lose his trust.

Better to sever than to keep wondering if he is doing it right.

Trust is everything.
 
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