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Rim Joist Repair

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My home is a 1926 Dutch Colonial, and we're having a new front walkway and stoop put in. After the demo today, I got a look at the rim joist below and to either side of the front door. I probably won't try to do this repair myself, but whether I do or hire someone, what would be considered best practices for replacing this rotted wood?

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My home is a 1926 Dutch Colonial, and we're having a new front walkway and stoop put in. After the demo today, I got a look at the rim joist below and to either side of the front door. I probably won't try to do this repair myself, but whether I do or hire someone, what would be considered best practices for replacing this rotted wood?

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Do the floor joist run perpendicular to the rim?

By the way sometimes they can be saved depending on how much good wood you have left.
 

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Stoop, wood or masonary? If concrete, no need. If wood, that rim joist could be like a ledger so must be cut out and replaced. There are ways to attach ledger to joists and maybe bypass that rim.
Concrete or wood, the wood framing must be protected from weather. It's called house wrap, barrier, flashing. They need to be overlapped from top to bottom so if there is a water leak, water follows the gravity and drains down over the overlap.
Best if door has a pan. check video on house wrap and door/window pans. Videos on vinyl siding flashing. If these are missing, replaced wood will rot again.
Remove the storm door and see if there are any joint under the door threshold, vinyl and sheetmetal wrap. Must be under those. If you can slip a sheetmetal even 1/4 or half an inch, you are creating overlapping flashing. If stoop is wood and pressure treated, you must use stick on flashing to cover the sheetmetal so that pt lumber does not touch aluminum or galvanized. Galvanization, if heavy enough, can protect but I don't think there are such sheetmetal. I say sheetmetal because it is stiff enough to slip under the door and siding. Must be under the door and siding. Caulking under there can make drainage worse by blocking the drainage plane.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Do the floor joist run perpendicular to the rim?

By the way sometimes they can be saved depending on how much good wood you have left.
No, the floor joists run parallel.


Do you have access to the crawlspace so an inspection can be done inside?
The inside area is a finished basement, so no real access without tearing into the drywall.
 

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retired framer
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No, the floor joists run parallel.




The inside area is a finished basement, so no real access without tearing into the drywall.
Usually, we use an awl to poke at lumber and compare it to what looks like good lumber to see how soft it is.
It looks like tar paper behind the bad pieces, and it looks like there has been some patch work.
You might remove that small piece and without destroying the paper try to inspect the wood behind there.
 

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No, the floor joists run parallel.




The inside area is a finished basement, so no real access without tearing into the drywall.
Tricky one. If you replace it, your kind of hoping the subfloor will hold it up.

You should scratch away at it and see how much is good. Being old growth you may have a chance that there is enough meat.
 

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Yes, the old stoop was a concrete base with a brick border. The new one is going to have be a concrete base. So once the wood is repaired, cover with something like Grace Vycor?
Often there is a problem with water around and under the door, you want to check special under the corners of the door.
Even if you don't want to do the whole fix you want to do it in way so that a door repair can be done later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Understood on checking under the door.

The masonry company doing the stoop and walkway has a contractor they deal with for issues like these, and he's going to come out tomorrow to see what's what. Thing is, he'll tell the supervisor of the masonry job what he thinks (including a cost estimate) not me, and then I'll get that info secondhand from the supervisor later in the day.

Given that the stoop has already been demoed and it's moving toward the end of November, I'm feeling like there's a chance I'll be rushed into getting this repaired by the masonry co.'s contractor. He may be fine, but I want to arm myself with as much info as possible to a) make sure I understand all of the repair options, b) be certain that I can or can't do it myself, and c) not get ripped off price wise (I know you guys can't help me with that last part).
 

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My home is a 1926 Dutch Colonial, and we're having a new front walkway and stoop put in. After the demo today, I got a look at the rim joist below and to either side of the front door. I probably won't try to do this repair myself, but whether I do or hire someone, what would be considered best practices for replacing this rotted wood?

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I had to rebuild a similar base in my house because of humidity and rust I had to change the wood and coat it with special paint
 

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Understood on checking under the door.

The masonry company doing the stoop and walkway has a contractor they deal with for issues like these, and he's going to come out tomorrow to see what's what. Thing is, he'll tell the supervisor of the masonry job what he thinks (including a cost estimate) not me, and then I'll get that info secondhand from the supervisor later in the day.

Given that the stoop has already been demoed and it's moving toward the end of November, I'm feeling like there's a chance I'll be rushed into getting this repaired by the masonry co.'s contractor. He may be fine, but I want to arm myself with as much info as possible to a) make sure I understand all of the repair options, b) be certain that I can or can't do it myself, and c) not get ripped off price wise (I know you guys can't help me with that last part).
You should first trust that your contractor will do the right thing.

Did he do something that makes you think he's not trustworthy?

If you don't trust him you should sever the partnership.
 

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You should first trust that your contractor will do the right thing.

Did he do something that makes you think he's not trustworthy?

If you don't trust him you should sever the partnership.
We see concrete against wood all the time causing problems, trusting the contractor is not a good idea.
Knowing what you need and want and being sure you are getting it is the only protection to be had.
 

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We see concrete against wood all the time causing problems, trusting the contractor is not a good idea.
Knowing what you need and want and being sure you are getting it is the only protection to be had.
I disagree, in life you must trust people. Most contractors will do the right thing because it's in their best interest.

What I mainly wanted to know, was has he done something to lose his trust.

Better to sever than to keep wondering if he is doing it right.

Trust is everything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
So a few spots go pretty deep with rot. I cut a hole in the drywall ceiling inside and took some shots with my camera.

It may be that I end up having to repair this myself, since the carpenter the masonry co. uses is sick and most other folks are too busy.

@Nealtw and anyone else with pro experience: Walk me through what I need to do here.
 

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So a few spots go pretty deep with rot. I cut a hole in the drywall ceiling inside and took some shots with my camera.

It may be that I end up having to repair this myself, since the carpenter the masonry co. uses is sick and most other folks are too busy.

@Nealtw and anyone else with pro experience: Walk me through what I need to do here.
If you have or get a multi saw like this.
Musical instrument Machine Screw gun Font Auto part

You could cut and remove just the plywood on the outside. So we could get a better look at the structure behind it.
A 1920s build will be balloon framed, so it is not like just working on a rim joist that you find in many videos.
They built the walls first and then built the floor inside.
 
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