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Hello everyone. I am going to install a gas range in place of an existing electric range. The space currently only has a 240 volt hookup. The gas range will need a conventional 120 volt receptacle. Is it a code violation if I re-use the existing wire from the 240 volt hookup but re-wire it to a 120 volt breaker and a standard receptacle? I am trying to avoid the added work of stringing new wire. However, the existing wire is VERY large (heavily insulated) wire intended for a high amperage appliance like a range or clothes dryer. I don't see any theoretical reason why this wire would be unsafe, but I thought it would safer to ask.
 

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If you need the extra slot in the electrical panel, you can also swap out the double pole breaker for a single 20A or 15A, with or without the adapter CodeMatters linked to. In that case, you would connect one of wires that was on the double pole breaker to the 20A breaker (if you use the adapter, you'll need to test to find out which hot wire the adapter is running off of), and wire nut the other inside the panel.

The electrical gurus here can correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe you can also split it into two 120V circuits as a multi-wire branch circuit (MWBC).
For that you'd need to replace the double pole breaker for the stove with a double pole 20A breaker (if such a thing exists?), or 2 single pole 20A breakers with a handle tie to connect them, so they trip together, since they'll be sharing a neutral and ground.
 

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I generally don’t screw around with the electric range circuit, particularly an old 3 wire no ground. (Hot, hot, neutral).

A gas range can be plugged into a countertop circuit (SABC).
 

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You can do it if it’s a 4-wire range circuit.

If it’s a 3-wire, yes, maybe...

...If they illegally used /2+ground cable (black white bare) in which case you can reassign the wires back to the roles they’re supposed to have.

If they used SE cable (black black webbed ground) then probably not, but check with the AHJ and see if they’ll give you a variance. AHJ = people who issue permits and inspect.

If they used /3 no-ground cable, black red white, you can strip the red insulation off the red wire everywhere it is visible and that converts it to a ground wire. It can’t be rolled back obviously. Nor should it. 3-wire range hookups are dangerous.

For whatever reason you’re not allowed to white- mark a colored wire everywhere it is visible. Seems odd to me one marking is allowed and the other not, but I don’t write the rules.
 

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I generally don’t screw around with the electric range circuit, particularly an old 3 wire no ground. (Hot, hot, neutral).
The adapter linked to by CodeMatters is a 4-prong plug, and the OP indicated that would work, so I assumed it has a ground. I agree, it wouldn't be advisable to do the MWBC using a 3 wire cable. Kitchen outlets should at least be grounded. Last I knew, GFCI outlets are required for outlets within 6' of water, unless the code has become more strict.


As far as whether it's worthwhile to pursue it, that depends on how adequate the existing kitchen circuits are. In my kitchen, I could really use a couple more circuits. (I only have 2 for everything)
 
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