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Discussion Starter #1
I recently had contractors assemble a plastic Lifetime (brand) shed and since it was done on a slope, they built a platform for it. When they put the posts in, however, they did not use any concrete. My concern is that the posts at the back will settle over time (is this a valid concern)? The front posts are on firmer ground. It is already slanted about two inches towards the back. My question is how should I remediate this. One suggestion is to dig new holes and add posts with a concrete base. Another is to dig around the existing posts and add concrete around the posts and a third suggestion is to add pre-set concrete blocks or cylinders as posts. These suggestions have come from talking to people. Would appreciate any feedback.
 

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retired framer
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Can you get a picture of the underside so we can see how it was built.
It should have been a few inches smaller than the shed so water could not get under the edges.
 

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retired painter
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Posts don't need to be set in concrete although it's nice if they are setting on concrete. Whether or not it will be an issue depends a lot on your climate and the type of ground [dirt] you have.


I'd want to figure out a way to slide flashing under the shed walls so water will be directed away from the platform.
 

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Can you get a picture of the underside so we can see how it was built.
It should have been a few inches smaller than the shed so water could not get under the edges.


It’s plastic, not very thick. The wife has one. We had to build the platform to the outside like above to support the wall.
 

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If the ground under the posts was excavated in the past, it might settle. If it is undisturbed it may or may not settle. If the soil is clay, it oozes when wet causing settling. Well drained gravelly soil is pretty firm. A concrete donut around the posts will not prevent settling. Freeze thaw cycles make things move, depends on where you are. All things considered, will it settle? Maybe, too many variables to tell.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you for the replies. To answer some of the comments, I live in Maryland and we do get below freezing temps in the winter. The soil is not clay and I don't believe it was disturbed prior. The area where the posts are is usually covered in brush during the summer. I was not present when it was built but SeniorSitizen is right, my wife was present and said the posts were only buried 6 to 8 inches. I get home well after its dark so I asked her to take some pictures and these are what she took. I'll try to take better ones in the morning. Based on what I'm gathering, I might leave it as is and maybe try to figure out how to divert any water away from the platform.
 

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Usually Confused
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Man, sorry to say but it looks like they built that platform from what was lying around. Are you sure the posts actually go into the ground? It almost looks like they are resting on the ground and those 2x6s nailed to them right at ground level are acting like stakes.
Of course a lot depends on your soil, but I stick-built a shed (a lot heavier) on a similar slope and just dug some shallow holes, tossed in some gravel and laid down concrete blocks. Never moved.
I agree that flashing is a good idea. Also, depending on your area, skunks will love their new home.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Man, sorry to say but it looks like they built that platform from what was lying around. Are you sure the posts actually go into the ground? It almost looks like they are resting on the ground and those 2x6s nailed to them right at ground level are acting like stakes.
Of course a lot depends on your soil, but I stick-built a shed (a lot heavier) on a similar slope and just dug some shallow holes, tossed in some gravel and laid down concrete blocks. Never moved.
I agree that flashing is a good idea. Also, depending on your area, skunks will love their new home.

They definitely go in the ground, just not very deep. You're right about the skunks. I'm going to block off that area with some chicken wire.
 

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Usually Confused
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They definitely go in the ground, just not very deep. You're right about the skunks. I'm going to block off that area with some chicken wire.

However you decide to fix it (short of getting the contractor back, depending on what was originally agreed on), setting the posts on something more solid after the fact is going to be a lot of manual labour but do-able. I would do a post at time supporting the platform with a bottle jack or two. It also seems like you have a lot of posts for just a plastic shed, but maybe I'm not seeing the photos well.
When you install your chicken wire, bury it in the ground 4-6" in a trench to keep the critters from digging under it. Actually, I find chicken wire pretty flimsy - I prefer 1/2" galvanized mesh screen.
 

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retired framer
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You don't build a floor with 2x4s
you either build it like a deck with post down to depth with concrete
Or you set it on sleepers like 6x6 posts set in a bed of gravel and build a wall at the back.
I really don't know where to start fixing what is there.
 

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I would think about trying to sink some piles on the corners at least. It looks like you might be able to sink some adjacent to the existing posts. Can't do anything for any supports in the middle of the field, obv.
 

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In my earlier reply where I mentioned the depth of the post, the depth isn't so much of an issue as all the posts being on EQUAL soil. i.e. if they were all on bed rock they could be on top of the ground.:wink2:
 
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