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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

First time posting here, and I'm taking on the project of converting a 10'x20' outbuilding on my property into an office. The first problem I've encountered is that there is no double top plate on the walls. I know this is required to meet code, and it makes common sense for strength. However, the part of me that has no experience with framing, especially a roof, doesn't want to rip perfectly good trusses all the way off, and have to go about re-installing them, which I've never done before.

My question is: Is there any way to "jack up" the trusses and slip a top plate on? Maybe one side at a time? Would it be more or less hassle than pulling the trusses off and starting over?

Thanks in advance,

Steve
 

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Are the trusses directly over the wall studs?
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ask, and you shall receive! Sorry for the low-quality of the pics, they're the product of a poor photographer using poor equipment.

Ron, excellent question! I hadn't noticed before, but it appears that the trusses are all located directly over the studs, or pretty close. Does this mean I don't need a double top plate? I know the double plate helps absorb the vertical load, but is it needed for shear force, as well?

This building was built in 1967, and the studs and trusses are all 24' on center. This being the case, I assumed that a good top plate was even more critical.
 

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Didn't this structure require a permit, get inspected and have a C of O?
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, permit was issued in '67, but no C of O since it's original use was a shed. Drywall and electric was installed at a later date, obviously without a permit.
 

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If it passed inspection, I wouldn't concern myself with structural adjustments.
Ron
 

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Are you pulling a permit for the conversion to office space? Do you need to do so? If doing this with a permit, then suggest to consult with the building dept. regarding the top plate.
 

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Single is fine if it meets the requirements. It’s been that way since I started framing in 1973, though I’ve always used a double;

“R602.3.2 Top plate. Wood stud walls shall be capped with a double top plate installed to provide overlapping at corners and intersections with bearing partitions. End joints in top plates shall be offset at least 24 inches (610 mm). Joints in plates need not occur over studs. Plates shall be not less than 2-inches (51 mm) nominal thickness and have a width at least equal to the width of the studs.

Exception: A single top plate may be installed in stud walls, provided the plate is adequately tied at joints, corners and intersecting walls by a minimum 3-inch-by- 6-inch by a 0.036-inch-thick (76 mm by 152 mm by 0.914 mm) galvanized steel plate that is nailed to each wall or segment of wall by six 8d nails on each side, provided the rafters or joists are centered over the studs with a tolerance of no more than 1 inch (25 mm). The top plate may be omitted over lintels that are adequately tied to adjacent wall sections with steel plates or equivalent as previously described.”

http://publicecodes.citation.com/icod/irc/2009/icod_irc_2009_6_sec002_par007.htm


I would get a permit, if required. The rafter heel cuts have gaps, add shims and a positive connection; pp.38, http://books.google.com/books?id=iw...age&q=heel or toe bearing with rafter&f=false


Gary
 
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