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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone!
I would appreciate advice on how to restore/repair the damage area on our entertainment center that was caused by our faithful dog Cooper (who is definitely in the dog house for unspecified amount of time). Apparently there was a toy that rolled under the cabinet and he decided to retrieve it no matter the time or destruction involved.
As you can see from the photo, he really scratched and chewed it up. I’ve already done some preliminary sanding to remove the worst splintering so our granddaughter doesn’t get impaled. I know there’s wood putty and bondo type fillers that probably can be used. I don’t know which would be better for this job. My issue is trying to restore the same profiles so repair is not noticeable. Also matching finish is going to be a challenge too. Matching the overall color won’t be a big problem but getting the random streaks of black might be difficult (all the paint stores have computerized color matching theses days). The wood appears to be pine.
My main concern is whether or not any attempts to restore area will be successful. How close to the original finish do you think is possible?
Thanks to all for any advice in restoring this disaster!
Voxman
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I'm afraid there's no easy way to repair that while retaining the original texture and finish. Can you give us some pics with more context showing the rest of the entertainment center? Maybe you could fill the holes/scratches and either paint the bottom section a solid color, or paint the whole thing.
 

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I does look like you could block up the floor and remove that piece but best if you knew who built it.
Matching the routered detail may be tricky, if it was done on a shaper you would only get close.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks all for suggestions. I’m getting the feeling this is not going to be easy repair.
I would like everyone to advise whether using wood filler or bondo for best results … any preference?
 

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The difficulty is not really the filler. I like Bondo myself.

The difficulty is getting the finish to match the rest of the unit. The finish there is semi-transparent and you can see the wood grain through it. Even if you had the skill and tools to match the finish, the Bondo or wood filler would not accept the stain and would look different.

That is really a job for a professional. Go to YouTube and search "John's Furniture Repair". The girl there really knows what she is doing. You will get a feel for what is involved in the task.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The difficulty is not really the filler. I like Bondo myself.

The difficulty is getting the finish to match the rest of the unit. The finish there is semi-transparent and you can see the wood grain through it. Even if you had the skill and tools to match the finish, the Bondo or wood filler would not accept the stain and would look different.

That is really a job for a professional. Go to YouTube and search "John's Furniture Repair". The girl there really knows what she is doing. You will get a feel for what is involved in the task.
Thank you for the advice. I’ll check her out. I realize this repair probably won’t turn out as hoped but will see.
Appreciate your help.
Voxman
 

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Depending how much money this is worth to you, based on this photo it look like the piece could be removed and replaced:
Wood Grey Floor Chair Wood stain


If you're able to remove it, it could be copied. You may have to take it to a woodworker to get the top profile done, depending on skills and tools available to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hmmm… I had already thought of the possibility of removing the trim piece and taking it to a furniture restorer. However I’m not totally sure it can come off without much effort and care not to do further damage to it or the surrounding areas.
I hadn’t thought of painting the entire trim piece once repair is done. That idea certainly has merit and has me thinking. Only problem might be my wife who may not like changing it so dramatically.
Again thanks for the great advice everyone! I’ll be sure to post the final outcome for those interested in seeing it.

Voxman
 

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That actually doesn’t look too bad to me. I bet that you will hardly notice a repair once you get it stained.

I’d use something like the plastic wood mentioned above, or bondo wood filler, or elmers two part epoxy wood filler, or whatever Tommy Sylva from thus old house is using here:

Maybe he’s using something from Albatron. One of those should accept stain to varying degrees.

Then cut a plastic putty knife to match the profiles of the areas that need repair. Put in the wood repair material, shape with the tool you’ve made, viola. Then get a scrap piece of pine and experiment mixing and matching stains till you get something close to the original. When you’ve got a close match, apply that to the repaired areas little by little. You can always add more but taking some away is not going to be easy, so be patient and use multiple coats. Maybe can you mix black paint into a gray stain? Or apply some black paint here and there after staining?

Your repair won’t look perfect, but if you get it close, the eye will not even be drawn down to that part of the furniture. Only you will know it’s been repaired. Your objective is just to make that repaired area as inconspicuous as possible.
Just practice with the stain a lot on scrap wood till you get it right.
 
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