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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I tore off a 4 X 8 section of tar and gravel BUR over my 22 X 22' sunroom down to the plywood deck, and a downpour caught me by surprise causing major leakage. I covered the roof with a tarp, so far stopping leakage from subsequent rain. I do not trust this solution for too long.

The existing BUR is about 1 inch thick over a layer of mechanically adhered felt paper.

I called 2 contractors and their estimates for full roof replacement are $4,000 for torched SBS MB and $7500 for single-ply PVC. Since I have been laid off I do not have this kind of money.

Can one of the master roofers in this forum suggest how I may repair the damage for 6 or more months while I find the money?

Thank you in advance for your help.
 

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Residential Roofer
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A picture of the area in need of repair would be great, if that's not possible for you than at least go into some more details.
Did you tear off a bottom, top or center portion of the roof.
Is it a dead flat deck or have some slope.
Are there any penetrations, pipes, heating exhaust, valley's, etc.

The more information the better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Slyfox for replying.

1- I tore off a 4' X 8' section of the lower part (further away from house wall, closer to gutter) of the roof.

2- It is a dead flat deck. I see no slope. I attach pictures, both looking to the deck from the house. The tear off can be seen on the lower left where water is ponding in a 4' X 8" area. I cannot take the tarp off to take a picture because of impending rain, but what you would see is the rotted and wet plywood.

3- There are no penetrations in the entire roof

Also, the space is unfinished inside, so I have access to the underside of the deck and have been ventilating it since the mishap. As far as I can tell it is dry now underneath. However, water indeed seeped under the BUR beyond the tear off and it may be there still...

I hope this clarified the situation. Let me know if more info. is needed.
 

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Residential Roofer
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That's a tough one.
You need to build the section up to the level of the rest of the roof of course, than cover with some thing cheap like roll roofing and over lap the existing materials on all four sides and seal those laps with roof cement.
Done properly you could very well get months out of such a temp repair.

Building the spot back up to level with the rest could be done using ply wood, insulation, smaller portions of lumber laid side by side etc.

You could cut the tarp to fit better and weigh it down and leave it as a temp, it may hold up a few months if weighed down properly, but you still need to fill in that spot you tore off.

You could leave the dip and use roof cement to seal the edges of the existing materials right to the roof deck, but with that type of ponding water you will be up there re-sealing that area every few weeks or more.

Your laid off, find a roofer willing to trade off labor, maybe you can offer some assistance they are looking for.

My neighbor is going to paint my house in November and I'm roofing his house next month, at the cost of materials only.
 

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Licensed P.E./Home Insp
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Bartering has worked well for me. I do engineering calcs and project estimating for contractors, sometimes on barter, and it's been win/win so far. I actually wish I could do more of it on barter. :whistling2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks again Slyfox. Regarding the build up of the torn-up section, would the following work?

1- coat the plywood with strong masonry waterproofing coating which I have left over from another job.
2- cover with GAF Weather Watch which HD sells to seal eaves.
3- Put a layer of Hernry 208R roof cement overlaping the above and the adjacent, gravel-embedded tar roof.
4- cover all so-cemented area with a Tarco fiberglass mineral-surfaced roll roofing
5- spread additional Henry 208R roof cement and embed fiberglass mesh into it
6 put on top another layer of roll roofing and so on until I build up, leaving on the very top a layer of Henry 208R roof cement.

Please let me know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Sliefox and Aggie67 for advice to barter labor with a roofer. I would do it but I know nothing about roofing and I am not good at manual labor, never done it before. I could do Economics and computers, but then again that is looking for a job, which I have been already doing for a while.
 

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Residential Roofer
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Thanks Sliefox and Aggie67 for advice to barter labor with a roofer. I would do it but I know nothing about roofing and I am not good at manual labor, never done it before. I could do Economics and computers, but then again that is looking for a job, which I have been already doing for a while.
I was referring to offering services you are familiar with in trade for his labor.
Such as computer help, maybe you have a roofer near by who doe's not have a website set up for his company yet, you could help him with starting one in trade for him providing you with a repair that will hold up for a few months until your financial situation is a little more stable.

A decently set up website for a business can run as low as 600 plus dollars up to as much as a few thousand.
Some one with computer skills could set it up on a free space site with the option of upgrading to the paid package.
I did my own site and have -0- computer training.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks again for advice Slyfox.

Any comment on the reply I posted to your first message regarding the way I am planning to patch my roof? Really would appreciate your views.
 

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Residential Roofer
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Thanks again Slyfox. Regarding the build up of the torn-up section, would the following work?

1- coat the plywood with strong masonry waterproofing coating which I have left over from another job.
2- cover with GAF Weather Watch which HD sells to seal eaves.
3- Put a layer of Hernry 208R roof cement overlaping the above and the adjacent, gravel-embedded tar roof.
4- cover all so-cemented area with a Tarco fiberglass mineral-surfaced roll roofing
5- spread additional Henry 208R roof cement and embed fiberglass mesh into it
6 put on top another layer of roll roofing and so on until I build up, leaving on the very top a layer of Henry 208R roof cement.

Please let me know.
Sounds like you figured it out, only thing to add is make sure you scrape the gravel off the existing roof atleast 4 to 8 inches so when you tie the two sections together you get proper a sealing.
 

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the Musigician
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why not just use rubber roofing? i used it on my camper 15 years ago, and it's still doing it's waterproofing job....

DM
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks Dangermouse for pitching in. What kind of rubber roofing do you have in mind? Membrane or liquid EPDM? Another kind in liquid or spreadable form? Remember it is a patch and the overlaps have to bond to an existing tar and gravel roof.
 

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the Musigician
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if it were me, i'd just keep puling the old crap off and then do a membrane.
mine still looks good, and i kept all the scraps too for other projects and just in case it ever got a hole or tear, i'd have an instant patch!
i just thought it was a great idea, and the roof cost me less than $100!
i had fresh decking so i just used contact cement instead of their expensive stuff. figured it wouldn't matter much since it never goes anywhere, and i reused the aluminum j channel to lock it down all around the edges.
but you'd likely want the 'good goop' for an actual roof.
i did try the mop on white stuff on the mobile roof once.... did not last long.

DM
 
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