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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey guys I'm new to the forum so if this threads in the wrong place just let me know. anyways I'm an apprentice welder and just bought a 220v max output 180 amp welder. a friend made the recommendation of using a dryer outlet for power but from my limited electrical knowledge it seems like that line couldn't handle 180amps. if I'm incorrect let me know, otherwise what all am I going to need to run this welder. thanks.
 

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the welder draws some (input) current other then it's rated output. you need to consult the manufacturer's info for use - input voltage and amps. then write back and let us know what it is.
 

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What Tim said. The 180A is the output. The input rating should be on a plate right on the welder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
okay on the spec list it said circuit breaker req. 25 amps. so as long as the line and the breaker are set to handle over 25 amp I'll be all good right?
 

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If that is exactly what is says then yes.

If the welder has a 30A plug you can use 10/2 cable, or two #10 conductors with a #10 ground in conduit, and a two-pole 25A breaker to fit your panel.

If it is a 50A plug then I would install a 50A circuit using #6 wire.
There are special rules for welders, but IMO if you are installing this in a house you should follow conventional wiring rules. You never know what someone is going to plug in later.

My Miller 170 has a 50A cord and plug and I plug it right into my old stick welder receptacle.
 
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hey guys I'm new to the forum so if this threads in the wrong place just let me know. anyways I'm an apprentice welder and just bought a 220v max output 180 amp welder. a friend made the recommendation of using a dryer outlet for power but from my limited electrical knowledge it seems like that line couldn't handle 180amps. if I'm incorrect let me know, otherwise what all am I going to need to run this welder. thanks.
Did the welder come with a plug and cord already installed? If so, what does the plug look like? A dryer plug has four prongs and provides 120 and 240 power. Most welders have a 50 amp plug that has three straight prongs and two are set at an angle and welders only need 240v power.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
so if it does draw less than 30 amps should I use 10/2 wire or 8/3? and what are the different applications with 2 wire or 3?
 

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so if it does draw less than 30 amps should I use 10/2 wire or 8/3? and what are the different applications with 2 wire or 3?
You have to wire the circuit to match the connectors and use the correct size wire. You first have to determine which plugs you will use. If the welder has a 50 amp plug you have to install a 50 amp receptacle and if you install a 50 amp receptacle you have to use #6 copper.
Look closely at the plug on the welder.
http://www.nooutage.com/nema_configurations.htm#NEMA Configurations
 

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If that is exactly what is says then yes.

If the welder has a 30A plug you can use 10/2 cable, or two #10 conductors with a #10 ground in conduit, and a two-pole 25A breaker to fit your panel.

If it is a 50A plug then I would install a 50A circuit using #6 wire.
There are special rules for welders, but IMO if you are installing this in a house you should follow conventional wiring rules. You never know what someone is going to plug in later.

My Miller 170 has a 50A cord and plug and I plug it right into my old stick welder receptacle.
That one thing about welder receptales I am very carefull with that and normally I wired with 16mm² { #6 AWG } with 50 amp breaker or fuse.

But I have older welder a Lincoln 250 A AC/DC stick welder but it was specal order to confreaged to work on 208 volt supply { I do run it near full capaity with hevaier matearls } but I have other welder wirefeeder type but it is a commercal verison so it can conferated on 480 volt supply.

Merci.
Marc
 

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I have a 30 amp recep (6-30R) connected with #10 wire and 30 amp breaker that I plug my Millermatic 175 welder (spec'ed to pull max ~25 amps) into - the welder has the differing common welder plug. I did not want to change the recep as I have other tools that plug directly into it as is. A 25' conversion extension cord handles the connector mating and lets me wheel the welder anywhere I need it in my shop. Do a Google search of welder conversion cord or similar, and you will find ready-made conversion/extension cables to buy or instructions on how to make your own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
so I understand all wiring has to match the circuit and line but if I run an extension cord does it also need to be 10/2 or a higher gauge?
 

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so I understand all wiring has to match the circuit and line but if I run an extension cord does it also need to be 10/2 or a higher gauge?
vsheetz slipped in a comment that I thought was from the OP.
primo, you never told us about the plug that came on the welder. If it is a 240 volt 30 amp plug you will have to install a 30 amp receptacle wired with 10-2/wg. I'm assuming your welder has a 6-30P. White wire will need to be marked as black using tape at both ends then you can connect it to a two pole 25 or 30 amp breaker. If you make an extension cord, it will have to be #10 too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
ok so the welder has no receptacle on it. 230v 25 amp input. I will need to purchase a 30 amp plug correct?
 

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Welders are a bit confusing - rated and wired differently primarily due to the low duty cycle during use. The 'standard' plug for most 220v welders and plazma cutters is a 50a plug - and one with two parallel blades that differ from most other 220v appliances and tools. But the smaller 220v units don't need a 50a circuit (as the OP reports his is rated at ~25a).

In this case you would be fine with a 30a plug and matching recepticle - fed from a 30a breaker and #10 wire. Alternatively you could install the 50a welder plug and matching recepticle. And yet another option is to install as I described previously, using a conversion extension cord (BTW - my ~25' conversion extension cord I made from #8, but it could be #10 and work fine).
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
okay I meant to say plug in my last post. it comes with the power cord that appears to be thicker than 10awg but it does not have a plug attached. I will need to identify the gauge of wire. buy a matching plug, the same gauge extension cord, and then the recepticle and line also set to carry the same amps? correct?
 

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The power cord on your welder may be #12 and not #10 - my Miller 175 has the orginal power cord and it's #12. So if you work from what the power cord for your all the wiring, plug/recept, etc. you may be sizing too small.

I imagine your welder has either a #10 or #12 power cord. I would suggest a minimum a common 30a circuit to power your 180 welder. A 30a breaker, #10 wires to a 30a recept (6-30R) - and then put the 30a plug on the welder power cord itself.

My setup is as above to the from the breaker to the recept30a breaker, #10 wires to a 30a recept (6-30R) - then I have a conversion extension cord from the recept to the welder which has the original/standard welder plug on it.
 
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