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I did not want to hi-jack this thread: http://www.diychatroom.com/f101/flooded_drywall-cutting-questions_suggestions-538481/index3/

My elderly parents own a duplex, where my sister is a tenant, that has about 18 inches of water in it. When the water recedes, I have asked my sister and friends to take hammers and bash in the drywall between every stud down at the baseboards, in addition to removing the contents, carpeting, opening windows, etc. I'm not certain how capable her friends are at actually removing drywall - I'm not certain I want them to do so and potentially create more work for me if they manage to damage the upper sheets.

I will arrive there in mid-Sept to complete the lower sheet drywall removal and set up dehumidifiers and set about to deal with a flooded basement in my parents house.

So my question is for months into the future when it will be time to replace the drywall - the upper sheet will be a 1/2+ thickness with remnants of tape and joint compound (I have a hard time calling it "mud" because as the son of a masonry contractor mud is mortar, and I spent much of my youth at the mixer making it) while the lower sheet w/ be tapered - how does one tape an offset thickness, build up enough compound and avoid sanding into the tape? Looking for tips - this type of a repair is out of my range of drywall experience. BTW, no flood insurance, unincorporated area so no inspectors so I do not need to go the full sheet up if that might make it a bit easier on me when it comes time to tape and float.

Thanks.
 

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It's best not to wait to run dehumidifiers, if nothing else I'd get them to plug up fans to get the air moving and dry things out. The quicker it gets dry the better!

Any joint that doesn't have the factory beveled edge gets treated like a butt joint - you feather it out further, usually 16" or more.
 

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It's best not to wait to run dehumidifiers, if nothing else I'd get them to plug up fans to get the air moving and dry things out. The quicker it gets dry the better!...
And buy/rent a good moisture meter to verify framing is adequately dry before covering anything -- don't rely on how the wood feels or looks!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
.......Any joint that doesn't have the factory beveled edge gets treated like a butt joint - you feather it out further, usually 16" or more.
Thanks for the replys.

I think I'll end up cutting the lower drywall sheet to about 40 inches up. I've asked my sister (and whatever friends/coworkers who have asked to help) to break the drywall out up to 3 ft high and I'll saw cut the remainder. I would rather tape across two surfaces that protrude out the same amount than deal with a step in the tape. Not sure when this will start - as of yesterday the water was lower but the house slab was still underwater
 

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As stated above, feather it out. The more you can feather it out the less noticeable. You could even skim coat the entire wall to build up thickness to match the butt joint.
 

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Time is of the essence as stated. From reports after Katrina they were saying you have 48 hours to get things dried out to prevent mold getting started. Problem is, it will not be accessible any sooner. They will need to remove any wet insulation asap and get the fans pointed at those walls.

There are also concerns with electrical wiring, receptacles, and if the basement was where the electrical panel was located it may need attention. Hard to advise plugging fans in if the power is compromised. Romex wires have a cardboard filler which isn't going to dry anytime soon. The electrical pros can advise on what cautions are needed.

2 but ends are more difficult than one with a factory taper and the cut side holds the baseboard vertical where a taper down there allows it to tip in. IMO, use the factory edge at the seam.

Bud
 

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if the basement was where the electrical panel was located it may need attention.
It doesn't matter where the panel is located. It could be on the side of the house. If the flood waters reached it, your best bet is to have it inspected by an electrician before energizing it.

A breaker failing to trip, coupled with compromised wiring/devices might finish what the flood started.

Here are the UL recommendations for dealing with flooded electrical.
http://cms.ul.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/UL_Flood_Electrical_Equipment_WP_V4.pdf
 

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Turn off power to the house before doing anything. You don't know when the power may come back on to the area and you don't want to be surprised when it does.

Getting the wet insulation out and air circulating is a must. Fiberglass insulation hold an enormous amount of water. A good leaf blower is very good at getting water out of all the nooks and crannies, cracks and crevices.

I wouldn't trust any breakers, outlets or switches that were submerged as you'll never get all the water out of them. They should all be replaced. Wiring should be fine.
 

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With walls opened to 48 inches, I'd replace the boxes as well.
Particularly with the smaller sizes used years ago, it's a great chance to replace them with larger capacity boxes.
 
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