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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently there has been quite a bit of condensation inside the back room windows of my home in the mornings. The trim around the glass is pretty rotten outside, and I'm assuming the inside is looking pretty bad as well (just can't see it quite yet). I've been searching around here to see if I can find a similar case, and so far I've found some good info, but wanted to get more opinions on how to tackle this problem.

My question is: should/can I remove this inner, 1" (I think) piece of trim, wood putty some of the really bad spots, run silicone around the perimeter, then replace the trim with a synthetic/plastic piece? So far, this seems like the best method to ensure moisture stays out, and it will hopefully prevent future rot. I'd like to replace it on both the interior and exterior.

Here are some pictures of the damage, and I've outlined the area where I'm wanting to replace.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That looks like something some one built in place. I would suspect you have a lot more trouble than you can see. Can you back up and take pictures of the whole window?
It's an add-on that was done sometime in the 70s, so it has lower ceilings and the brick flooring used to be the outside patio. So, like you said, it's definitely something somebody built as an afterthought. Here are a couple pictures from the outside.
 

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retired framer
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That is or was a nice looking set up, more like a store front.

There are things done today there were not done 15 or 20 years ago to make that work.
You might be able to carve out the rot and do an epoxy repair that would buy you a few more years, unless you want to really get into it.

Notice in this the windows beside the door is set in what might be an out swing door jam with aluminum threshold.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That is or was a nice looking set up, more like a store front.

There are things done today there were not done 15 or 20 years ago to make that work.
You might be able to carve out the rot and do an epoxy repair that would buy you a few more years, unless you want to really get into it.

Notice in this the windows beside the door is set in what might be an out swing door jam with aluminum threshold.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3l5q0xaQEf8
Yeah, I've seen this video before, and I actually did this to a door about a year back. I'm more concerned with ripping the trim off that goes around the inside part of the glass, sealing the edge with silicone, then installing a new piece of trim that won't rot.
 

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retired framer
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Yeah, I've seen this video before, and I actually did this to a door about a year back. I'm more concerned with ripping the trim off that goes around the inside part of the glass, sealing the edge with silicone, then installing a new piece of trim that won't rot.
All sealing has to be done on the outside first. the trim is holding the glass so do one piece at a time.
 

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You see this a lot.

Looks like somebody enclosed a breezeway that connects the house to a garage.

I would replace the rotted wood and have it cladded with aluminum.

Maybe have it replaced with either pressure treated or PVC wood and painted.
 

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You can contact Lakenormanwindows, as they are the best team of professionals who provides the best window repair and replacement services in the areas of concord. They have also provided their contact number for a free consultation on their website. You can visit their website.
 

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Caulking EVERY joint, inside and outside, then finish with 3 coats of paint, will give the whole assembly longer life - after replacing small trims. If you give this to the pros, ONLY recommendation they can give you with assurance is to replace the whole thing, high cost. The original wasn't built to give you lasting work, although that depends on how long you want to keep it.
I fixed rotting sills by covering them with thin pvc stock and using osi quad caulk to seal glass to sill joints. If trying something like it, and if you don't have some idea and experiences with caulking, need to learn. Basically, tape, feathering and at least 1/4" bead for tight joints.
 
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