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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am framing my basement and want to put a load-bearing wall in place of three jack posts. I bought two extra posts to temporarily hold the wall while I switch out the posts.

My question is - what should I put in place of the post jacks? I was thinking of putting three 2x4's together every place there was a post, so I'd literally have something like 12 2x4's holding up a 6ft section of wall (w/ double bottom plates and a 2x4 header)

Does this sound right? By which I mean, will it work, even if it is a little excessive. This wall is one of the most important things holding up my house, it's dead-center in the basement, with three-stories on top of it. Not going to worry about saving $20 worth of 2x4's.
 

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I think you are in engineer territory. Somebody needs to look at the plans (or built house?) and see how much weight is up above, including snow/wind/dead load, etc. I'd not guess on this.
 

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bob's right ! :thumbup: have found its usually best using our time for more productive work than trying to reinvent the wheel - imn-s-hfo, that is :yes:
 

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The scenario of removing the posts, makes no sense. Leave them alone and frame around them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Only reason I wanted the posts out of there is because you can't attach wood to the posts. If I framed around them, I'd have like 1 2x4 by itself on the end, then like a 6in space, then another really narrow space. Guess the problem boils down to the fact that that you can't attach nails or drywall to the posts.

Still, the posts are rated to 18,000 lbs a piece, which I'm guessing is better than any wood solution. Biggest pain is going to be securing the end 2x4, since it will have nothing to hold it but a 3in wide bottom plate and liquid nail at the top (no wood to attach to up top, it's a 1/4in steel plate that's held up my the post). Probably going to have to use a couple, but I don't want to get it much wider because of where the wall sits in relation to the stairs.
 

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Yes, what's stated above.
Also -
Is the bottom flange of the existing "jack-posts" sitting on the concrete
floor? - are they encased in the floor?
Are they solid posts - do they have adjustable screws on top?
What's the beam made of - steel, multiple 2 X's, LVL ?
String the bottom of the beam (sight it) - excessive downward deflection?
Is the beam "broken" over any of the posts (not continuous)?
Any cracks in the floor by the posts?
Any of the above?

If not: frame around the posts (leave them) - even if you have to make it a 2 X 6 wall.
RF
 

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Only reason I wanted the posts out of there is because you can't attach wood to the posts. If I framed around them, I'd have like 1 2x4 by itself on the end, then like a 6in space, then another really narrow space. Guess the problem boils down to the fact that that you can't attach nails or drywall to the posts.
There is no reason to attach anything to the posts.
Easy:
Butt the top and bottom plate to the post. Attach the studs on either side of the posts, to the both plates. The sheetrock bridges the post on either side.
Just pick a framing member as wide or wider then the post.
Little harder:
Cut a curve in the plates so it wraps around the post slightly.
everything else is the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Think I got it figured out. Basically, I'm removing one post completely, because I don't think it was really doing anything - then framing around the other two. Might sound like a bad solution, but if you saw how my house was constructed, you'd understand just how likely it is that a support pole was added where it shouldn't have been. The beam it supports is resting on an ibeam about 5 feet from the pole (plus the whole house is built with like 3x8 rough cut beams)
 

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Think I got it figured out. Basically, I'm removing one post completely, because I don't think it was really doing anything - then framing around the other two. Might sound like a bad solution, but if you saw how my house was constructed, you'd understand just how likely it is that a support pole was added where it shouldn't have been. The beam it supports is resting on an ibeam about 5 feet from the pole (plus the whole house is built with like 3x8 rough cut beams)
I have no idea if you know what you're doing, so good luck with the project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Basically I took the advice to frame around the poles, but was able to get rid of one pole, which made it a lot easier and let me put the wall where I wanted it.
 

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Too Short? Cut it Again!
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Think I got it figured out. Basically, I'm removing one post completely, because I don't think it was really doing anything - then framing around the other two.
One of the fastest ways to determine whether a support member is really needed is to remove it, watch and listen as timber groans, snaps, crackles and pops. And why not start with a post under what you know to be key load bearing structure for three full floors plus attic?:eek:

There is really know downside to this approach I can think of. :laughing::laughing::laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
One of the fastest ways to determine whether a support member is really needed is to remove it, watch and listen as timber groans, snaps, crackles and pops
Yeah, this is one of the reasons I feel good about removing the post. Took out the old one, nothing made noise or shifted. Took out the temp support, nothing made noise or shifted. Guess one of the old owners just thought it looked like it needed a support post there :)
 

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I am framing my basement and want to put a load-bearing wall in place of three jack posts. I bought two extra posts to temporarily hold the wall while I switch out the posts.

My question is - what should I put in place of the post jacks? I was thinking of putting three 2x4's together every place there was a post, so I'd literally have something like 12 2x4's holding up a 6ft section of wall (w/ double bottom plates and a 2x4 header)

Does this sound right? By which I mean, will it work, even if it is a little excessive. This wall is one of the most important things holding up my house, it's dead-center in the basement, with three-stories on top of it. Not going to worry about saving $20 worth of 2x4's.
Call your building inspector and ask him. You need permits and inspections anyway.
 

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Call your building inspector and ask him. You need permits and inspections anyway.
Too late if I read all the posts correctly proving you do not need permits and inspections---even for changes to load bearing structure. I think the OP removed the post he saw no need for and has his wall framed already. Oh well, it is his house and family living stories above. :confused1:

Hope this guy is just playing us for some fun.
 

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Too late if I read all the posts correctly proving you do not need permits and inspections---even for changes to load bearing structure. I think the OP removed the post he saw no need for and has his wall framed already. Oh well, it is his house and family living stories above. :confused1:

Hope this guy is just playing us for some fun.
The OP was an idiot anyway just like the rest of he idiots who do things with no permits and no knowledge.
 
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