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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a shed that was converted into a small living space. It was built completely on the the ground, without PT joists. I am in the process of replacing the subfloor and joists. Should I dig out some of the soil and put a vapor barrier and gravel? My concern with this would be disturbing the rest of the structure if i start removing too much. Probably would need to removing at least 4inches of dirt to get enough gravel in and keep the joists off the soil. If I shouldnt remove a bunch of dirt is it possible to put the vapor barrier on the soil then rest the joist on 6x6 pavers every few feet just to keep them out of the ground and give it some support? The structure sits directly next to a canal and is grandfathered in so im not sure jacking the structure up would be feasible, and not sure I can get in to that....Thanks
 

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retired framer
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First take the time to see if raising it doable. that is the best bet.

Second choice would be to replace it with concrete.



So how big is the shed and what do you think the obstacles are to lifting it.
Keep in mind just to change the joists you have to lift up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
First take the time to see if raising it doable. that is the best bet.

Second choice would be to replace it with concrete.



So how big is the shed and what do you think the obstacles are to lifting it.
Keep in mind just to change the joists you have to lift up.



The structure is about 30x12. Floor and joist are removed. I cut the floor that was still in good shape a few inches from the bottom plate. The rest of the floor was rotten under the plate. What would be the easiest way to put the subfloor under the plate if all the flooring is removed? Is it possible to just put pieces of subfloor under the plate then butt the floor to them... Im assuming i can leave the good floor under and just put another joist along the seam. I thought i would need to support the walls with the joist and subfloor removed, but all seems well so far.



I just dont feel confident and dont have the funds to hire someone to raise the building. This structure was built in the 70s.
 

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retired framer
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The structure is about 30x12. Floor and joist are removed. I cut the floor that was still in good shape a few inches from the bottom plate. The rest of the floor was rotten under the plate. What would be the easiest way to put the subfloor under the plate if all the flooring is removed? Is it possible to just put pieces of subfloor under the plate then butt the floor to them... Im assuming i can leave the good floor under and just put another joist along the seam. I thought i would need to support the walls with the joist and subfloor removed, but all seems well so far.



I just dont feel confident and dont have the funds to hire someone to raise the building. This structure was built in the 70s.
Do you want to take the time to consider the lift. Talking about it does not cost anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There would be some other bracing so it stays safe.

but it would be 3 beams like this with 6 small hydraulic jacks.



I attached a few pictures of the outside. Just seems like im getting a bit over my head trying to jack it up with it being that close to the water.
 

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retired framer
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I attached a few pictures of the outside. Just seems like im getting a bit over my head trying to jack it up with it being that close to the water.
It would come with a certain amount of fear, understood.

We can look at your plan on digging it out some.

I will be back.
 

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I attached a few pictures of the outside. Just seems like im getting a bit over my head trying to jack it up with it being that close to the water.
Have you checked the bottom plate of the wall for rot.
An ice pick or awl poked thru the drywall and you will feel wood hard or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ya seems good. I know some of it was replaced a while back before we drywalled..that is sitting on what looks to be a pressure treated timber


The structure is about 30x12. Floor and joist are removed. I cut the floor that was still in good shape a few inches from the bottom plate. The rest of the floor was rotten under the plate. What would be the easiest way to put the subfloor under the plate if all the flooring is removed? Is it possible to just put pieces of subfloor under the plate then butt the floor to them... Im assuming i can leave the good floor under and just put another joist along the seam. I thought i would need to support the walls with the joist and subfloor removed, but all seems well so far.



I just dont feel confident and dont have the funds to hire someone to raise the building. This structure was built in the 70s.
Do you want to take the time to consider the lift. Talking about it does not cost anything.
 

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retired framer
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Ya seems good. I know some of it was replaced a while back before we drywalled..that is sitting on what looks to be a pressure treated timber
With much the same system with one beam, just to take the weight off the rim joist.
Just work in section of 6 to 8 ft at a time,

dig out 12" and install 2 layers of 6x6 ground contact treated timbers,
Use joist hangers to hang the joists side to side from the timbers so the subfloor sits onto the timbers.

Notice i added a drain to a pump just outside so you can monitor or pump water from under.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Are you saying to put the 6x6 under the wall plate? I just worried about digging out too much material and having the structure not supported...

QUOTE=Nealtw;6041167]
Ya seems good. I know some of it was replaced a while back before we drywalled..that is sitting on what looks to be a pressure treated timber
With much the same system with one beam, just to take the weight off the rim joist.
Just work in section of 6 to 8 ft at a time,

dig out 12" and install 2 layers of 6x6 ground contact treated timbers,
Use joist hangers to hang the joists side to side from the timbers so the subfloor sits onto the timbers.

Notice i added a drain to a pump just outside so you can monitor or pump water from under.[/QUOTE]
 

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retired framer
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Are you saying to put the 6x6 under the wall plate? I just worried about digging out too much material and having the structure not supported...

QUOTE=Nealtw;6041167]
With much the same system with one beam, just to take the weight off the rim joist.
Just work in section of 6 to 8 ft at a time,

dig out 12" and install 2 layers of 6x6 ground contact treated timbers,
Use joist hangers to hang the joists side to side from the timbers so the subfloor sits onto the timbers.

Notice i added a drain to a pump just outside so you can monitor or pump water from under.
[/QUOTE]
There are some details to talk about but having a building fall apart is not one of them. They are tough critters.

I did say you would do it in smaller sections.

I do have a few more questions before I would say it would be safe to go.

I did say 12" but what it would be 6" lower that the joist are now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
There are some details to talk about but having a building fall apart is not one of them. They are tough critters.

I did say you would do it in smaller sections.

I do have a few more questions before I would say it would be safe to go.

I did say 12" but what it would be 6" lower that the joist are now.[/QUOTE]




I attached a few more pictures. Looks like this thing was built at two separate times and added the one section on. The joists coming from the other room seem fine. I will tackle that side next year. Is it possible to do away with the floor joist and build a frame out to the bottom plate and pour a concrete pad? I would extend the pad to that interior wall.
 

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The best option would be to pour a concrete slab to replace the wooden floor. The second best option is to replace the wooden floor with 12"x12" concrete pavers on sand. The third best option is to replace the old joists with 4x P.T. joists over a vapor barrier. Raising the whole shed to add a ventilated floor system would be overkill for this project.
 

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retired framer
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There are some details to talk about but having a building fall apart is not one of them. They are tough critters.

I did say you would do it in smaller sections.

I do have a few more questions before I would say it would be safe to go.

I did say 12" but what it would be 6" lower that the joist are now.



I attached a few more pictures. Looks like this thing was built at two separate times and added the one section on. The joists coming from the other room seem fine. I will tackle that side next year. Is it possible to do away with the floor joist and build a frame out to the bottom plate and pour a concrete pad? I would extend the pad to that interior wall.[/QUOTE]
When you copy and paste like that I don't get a notice of the quote.
Just hit the quote button. If you have it cleaned out to the rim joist and it not falling down you could remove all the soft dirt and replace it with gavel and and pour concrete slab 3 1/2" over sheet poly.

It would be best to compact the fill but shaking the building might be risky too.
 

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