DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,

About to swap in a 36 x 80 mahogany door slab. It will probably need to be cut, then sealed/stained (it's unfinished), latch/knob holes cut, etc. Also got a little banged up in transit, unfortunately at exterior facing hinge-side corners, so hopefully they seal ok.

Things on my mind:
  • the door is probably quite a bit heavier than the existing door (which was maybe fiberglass? there are mold/cast marks(?) around a window)
  • existing door measures 76 1/16" in height with about a 1/2" of weather stripping at the bottom, seal is good.
  • existing frame (the space the door will fill) is exactly 36" wide, but 36 1/8" wide in the middle (noticeable where the deadbolt is)
  • both doors are 1 3/4" thick

Knowing these things, here are some questions
  • Seems I need to cut the bottom, should try to cut to 76 1/6 and duplicate the weather striping?
  • Think I need to cut the sides?
  • Can I use existing hinges with a bigger top screw?
  • I'd prefer to do all measurements, cutting and hardware before swapping it in, is that fine? (I've seen some folks do the latch and bolt cuts after the door is hung, or resting one door on another then making marks)

If you have any suggestions/tips about seal/stain/method, I'd welcome that also. I can also post pics of the damaged corners.

Thanks!

Here's the door.

Table Wood Flooring Indoor games and sports Gas
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
59,711 Posts
The last few we have done we just found a door shop and dropped off both doors for a few hours.
The door jam should be straight, sounds like some one missed the shims at the latch and then added security screws.
You can try the same hinges and you will be good at it if you want to up grade them later.
If your door has a good top gap, and it is square across the top. Take all measurement from and to the top of the door.
You will be cutting the bottom put a tape on the door, set up a plywood cutting jig and start the cut with a sharp knife.
More teeth in a circular saw blade is better.
Measure everything more than once.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The last few we have done we just found a door shop and dropped off both doors for a few hours.
The door jam should be straight, sounds like some one missed the shims at the latch and then added security screws.
You can try the same hinges and you will be good at it if you want to up grade them later.
If your door has a good top gap, and it is square across the top. Take all measurement from and to the top of the door.
You will be cutting the bottom put a tape on the door, set up a plywood cutting jig and start the cut with a sharp knife.
More teeth in a circular saw blade is better.
Measure everything more than once.
Cool, thanks Nealtw. (y)

I had read/seen about the tape/jig/score cut, will do that. A guy at my local builders store also showed me some saw guides you can get for doors, seems they telescope, some with clamps some without.

Next on my list will also be getting a circular saw and 7 1/4" blade. The Diablo 60 tooth ultra finish one seems good but there's also cheaper 140 tooth plywood ones, which would be best here? I'll post my first few choices of potential circular saws and blades once I've narrowed it down. Hoping I can go for a saw $100 or less since I won't be needing it for daily jobs etc.

So do you think the door will need to be cut/planed at the sides since it seems like it might be a pretty snug fit?
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
59,711 Posts
Often the door is a bit wide and needs to be trimmed.
Build a cutting jig, it will do for the bottom and the side.
Once built it will be pacific to that saw and the blade you are using.
It helps you get perfect cuts and makes any saw do good work on most anything you might want to work on.
Amazing Circular Saw Jig: Quick, Accurate & Easy - YouTube
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
I'd recommend taking both the old and new slabs to a millworks/door shop (most lumberyards have one) and have them prep your new slab for hanging. I've been doing these for 30 years and that's how I do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Often the door is a bit wide and needs to be trimmed.
Build a cutting jig, it will do for the bottom and the side.
Once built it will be pacific to that saw and the blade you are using.
It helps you get perfect cuts and makes any saw do good work on most anything you might want to work on.
Amazing Circular Saw Jig: Quick, Accurate & Easy - YouTube
Awesome, thanks! I was going to go with this circular saw and blade if it makes sense. Was kinda curious about the 140 tooth plywood blades also and if they're appropriate for 1 3/4" mahogany.


Should 1/8" gap between door and frame suffice?


Craftsman 15 amps 7-1/4 in. Corded Circular Saw
https://www.acehardware.com/departments/tools/power-tools/circular-saws/2827491

Diablo 7-1/4 in. x 60-Tooth Fine Finish Circular Saw Blade
https://www.homedepot.com/p/DIABLO-7-1-4-in-x-60-Tooth-Fine-Finish-Circular-Saw-Blade-D0760R/100627136
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'd recommend taking both the old and new slabs to a millworks/door shop (most lumberyards have one) and have them prep your new slab for hanging. I've been doing these for 30 years and that's how I do it.
Thing is this is replacing an exterior front door in a house people live in, so can't really be waiting on a door shop... trying to go for the hot swap.
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
59,711 Posts
Thing is this is replacing an exterior front door in a house people live in, so can't really be waiting on a door shop... trying to go for the hot swap.
Pretty much any corded 7 1/4" saw will work even a used one, they just needed to be checked that the blade is square to the base plate even with a new one. Cutting it to the same size as the old one usually is a safe bet.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top