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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i need to replace an old toilet in a little 1 level house. i'm doing almost all the repair and upgrades to this house by my self...with a book in one hand and a tool in the other. the house is about 140 miles from where i live, so i'm not there more than 10 times a year at this point. the existing toilet was placed in the 1960's, not sure when, but the exit hole is directed to the front of the toilet and not the rear as i see in the newer toilets. never really paid much attention to toilet holes before. the toilet plugs frequently, i've used drain cleaner, drain opener, root killer, all without any long term success. the water from the plugged toilet will back up into the bathtub. i've decided the drain needs rotorooting and since i will probably have to replace the toilet anyway, i may as well do that while the plumber is there. the problem is...i dont know if the existing toilet is a 10" or 12" measurement. is there any rule of thumb about these old toilets? it does sit right up against the wall.
 

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12" is the standard----10" is an odd ball.
 

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You can measure from your wall to where the bolts attach the toilet to the floor. Normally 12" is the measurement, but there are times in confined spaces where the flange (the piece or pipe that the toilet get screwed to) will be 10" on center from the wall. The key is where the bolts are since they are normally in the center of the flange. If the bolts measure 12" from the wall a regular toilet can be used. If the bolts are 10" from the wall you might need to special order a toilet for that smaller measurement.
 

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You can measure from your wall to where the bolts attach the toilet to the floor. t.


Some older toilets were actually bolted to the floor,not the flange.

This is rare but something to know---if the bolts aren't at 12" or 10" from the wall you may want to pull the toilet to see where the drain is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks so much for the replies. the toilet is located in central utah in a VERY rural area. as i recall has 4 bolt holes in the base. the front 2 are no longer bolted to anything. i'll go with the 12" measurement and hope i don't have to bring the toilet back and trade it in.
 

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thanks so much for the replies. the toilet is located in central utah in a VERY rural area. as i recall has 4 bolt holes in the base. the front 2 are no longer bolted to anything. i'll go with the 12" measurement and hope i don't have to bring the toilet back and trade it in.

That's the safest bet----10" toilets are extremely rare----

Just curious---what part of Utah? I've traveled the back roads of that state---some parts are fascinating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
a little town called ferron on state road 10, near the san rafael swell. the original part of the house is a kit made of solid lumber, like lincoln logs. evidently you could buy one from sears before ww2. the bathroom was added sometime in the 1960s by the little old lady's kids. not a very good job of it either. i don't know if anything was built to code...any code. been doing some more research...i think the toilet is a 'washdown' type. the site said it wasn't manufactured anymore. i'll just buy every thing i can get my hands on at the depot and hope i have it covered.
 

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Thanks---You will want several wax rings---bolts----a steel flange repair ring would be good to have ,just in case, and some long wood screws to screw that to the floor if it's needed.

Good luck and do let us know how it works out.---Mike---
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
any recommendation for parts would be greatly appreciated. just remember, i'm book taught, and i do this stuff because its cheaper than a psychiatrist and more productive! don't assume that i know ANYTHING.
 

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Get your self a couple of water lines----modern ones are 3/8" at the shut off---some old ones are 1/2" so get one of each,just in case---take back the extras.

Shims might be needed if the floor is a roller coaster---a tube of silicone caulk to glue in the shims is also handy----

If the toilet uses a 60 year old shut off----my advice is to shut off the water to the house and not disturb the old shut off----they break---and the plumbing that it is attached to is old and fragile.

If you decide to mess with the old shut off be prepared for the very real possibility that the old pipe will break off inside the wall-----Mike----
 
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