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There are four wires. I understand the two hot wires and the neutral but where does the ground wire go? Paired with the neutral?
Thanks!
 

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There are four wires. I understand the two hot wires and the neutral but where does the ground wire go? Paired with the neutral?
Thanks!
You only have 3 wires now, but your new dryer has 4 wires. Is that the situation?

I have put in two corded dryers and the installation instructions covered this situation. If yours doesn't, ask the manufacturer for their recommendation.
I don't know, but code might require a new 4 wire circuit. It doesn't for a corded dryer, but that is because you aren't doing anything to the circuit; while you are.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The wire to the old dryer has four leads. Two hot, one neutral, and one ground. The receptical I bought matches the plug on the dryer. The receptical doesn't have a place for the neutral. Should I combine the ground with the neutral?
 

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Never combine the ground with the neutral. Instead, the correct procedure would be to use both a 4-conductor cord and receptacle: NEMA 14-30
 

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Discussion Starter #6
kbsparky said:
Never combine the ground with the neutral. Instead, the correct procedure would be to use both a 4-conductor cord and receptacle: NEMA 14-30
Okay - I will replace the plug and get a new outlet. Thank you for your advice.

Connor
 

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I've never seen a hard wired dryer before... who does that?
It was done once in a while back in the 60s around here. Pretty rare though.

Usually a piece of 1/2 flex from a blank box cover w/ko to the back of the dryer. usually a flex 90º on both the box cover and the dryer. The few I've seen had 4 wires, #10 black and red, #12 white and a#14 bare.

Reduced grounds were legal back then, and very common.

Rob
 

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I've never seen a hard wired dryer before... who does that?
Dryers and ranges were once commonly hard-wired in apartments to prevent unauthorized removal of those appliances. Cheaper, too since no receptacle or cords were needed.

This is the main reason why manufacturers still to this day do NOT provide cords for those appliances.
 

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Yeah just install a 4 prong dryer outlet. Keep in mind they are different from range outlets. Dryer = 30a, range = 40a. When I moved into my house the dryer was actually hard wired, was actually an odd setup, there was an A/B switch that it connected to, and there was a heater on that switch too. Guess that's one way to deal with a full panel. lol
 

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This is the main reason why manufacturers still to this day do NOT provide cords for those appliances.
I always figured it was because either a 3 wire or 4 wire cord could be needed.. and its cheaper for the manufacture NOT to supply one.

Not sure how hardwiring one would be much cheaper since you now need a disconnect, where the cord was the disconnect before.
 

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The dryer that we got with our place, that had been there since the mid 70's, was hardwired to old school 10/3 with no ground, that had just the Black/White/Red.
 
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